Curriculum

Course Offerings

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Spring 2018

Required Core
UEP 0251-01 ECONOMICS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY ANALYSIS
Required core course for M.A. and M.P.P. students. Economic concepts and tools of analysis for graduate students interested in public policy and planning. The emphasis of this course will be on microeconomic policy tools, although some macroeconomic topics will also be covered. The course will discuss the economic theories and techniques that can inform current policy debates such as global climate change, health care, employment, and economic inequality. The class will also demonstrate the limitations of economic analysis in guiding policy making. Although prior coursework in economics is not required, students are required to have a solid understanding of college-level algebra. Waiver permitted for students with an undergraduate major or substantial work-related experience in economics subject to faculty approval.
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9:00-10:15AM
Location: Eaton Hall, Room 206
Instructors: Eric Hoyt, Mary Davis
Syllabus:

UEP 0251-LA ECONOMICS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY ANALYSIS – LAB (OPTIONAL)
Time: Mondays, 5:00-6:00PM
Location: Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructors: Eric Hoyt, Mary Davis
Syllabus:

UEP 0255-01 FIELD PROJECTS: PLANNING AND PRACTICE
Required core course for students in M.A. program. Practical planning and research experience in a community or governmental setting. Students are exposed to the realities of urban and environmental planning practice by working in teams for actual clients. Focuses on the interplay of expertise, social and political values, and professional relationships.
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00AM-12:00PM
Location:
Instructors: Beth Garver, Penn Loh, Ann Rappaport
Syllabus:

UEP 0255-LA FIELD PROJECTS: PLANNING AND PRACTICE – LAB (OPTIONAL)
Time: Mondays, 9:00-11:00AM
Location:
Instructors: Beth Garver, Penn Loh, Ann Rappaport
Syllabus:

UEP 0289-01 INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR
Required core course for students in M.P.P. program. Challenges students to examine their academic learning, to demonstrate mastery of specific skills, and to examine the implications of policy development and implementation in complex and politically charged settings (half credit).
Time: Wednesdays, 4:30-5:45PM
Location: 97 Talbot Avenue
Instructor: Penn Loh
Syllabus:

Electives in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
UEP 0094-01/ENV 0094-01 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, PLANNING AND POLITICS (Undergraduate students only)
(Co-listed with Environmental Studies)
Open only to undergraduates, course introduces students to the concepts and techniques central to environmental policy, including the important roles played by politics and planning. Serves as a foundation for further work in Environmental Studies or as a broad overview of the issues key in the field. Structured around four varied case studies involving simulated environmental conflicts, each culminating in a "policy forum" consisting of presentations by student teams who represent specific interests (e.g., environmental advocates, legislators, agencies and corporations). Course also features guest presentations by other faculty from the graduate Department of Urban and Environmental policy and Planning.
Time: Thursdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Lane Hall, Room 100A
Instructor: Staff
Syllabus:

UEP 0181-01/CD 0143-05 HOMELESSNESS IN AMERICA
This course examines the inter-connected social, economic, and political causes and effects of homelessness among individuals, families, communities, and social systems. It examines a range of government, nonprofit, and other efforts to address those problems. Students engage in a team project and have opportunities to volunteer at an organization that serves people experiencing homelessness.
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1:30-2:45PM
Location: Tisch Library, Room 314
Instructor: Laurie Goldman
Syllabus:

UEP 0183-01/CD 0181-01 EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION POLICY AND PRACTICE
Study of child care within the context of social policy, child development, and early-childhood education. Examination of legislation, funding, programming, curriculum, and staffing; and how age, stage, gender, race, culture, and family lifestyle affect the child's experience of child care. Students use Tufts Educational Day Care Center as a laboratory. Prerequisite: Child Development 1 or Psychology 1, or consent.
Time: Thursdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Eliot-Pearson, Room 163
Instructor: John Lippitt
Syllabus:

UEP 0188-01/CD 0188-01 SEMINAR ON GOVERNMENT AND THE FAMILY
(Co-listed with Department of Child Development)
Government's role in promoting family development and well-being. Analysis of how various policies such as welfare, housing, community development, child support, and education impact children and families. CD 182 or consent required.
Time: Thursdays, 9:00AM-11:30AM
Location: Eliot-Pearson, Room 163
Instructor: Virginia Weisz
Syllabus:

UEP 0201-01/CE 0201-01 LAND USE PLANNING II
(Co-listed with Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Overview of land use planning methods, growth dynamics, and land development controls. Comparison of different approaches to land use planning and decision making. Impact of recent environmental legislation on land use. Techniques of mapping, site analysis, subdivision regulation, development controls, and fiscal incentives.
Time: Mondays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Lane Hall, Room 100A
Instructor: Jon Witten
Syllabus:

UEP 0194-01 URBAN DESIGN AND THE CHANGING SUBURBS
This course is intended to complement the urban orientation of other design courses at UEP by addressing the planning challenges posed by suburbs, in both their physical and social dimensions and the new emphasis on sustainable communities: a car-dependent, use-segregated environment and changing demographics.
Time: Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructor: Beth Lundell Garver
Syllabus:

UEP 0194-02 TECHNOLOGY, MEDIA AND THE CITY
This seminar is an introduction to how people have used information communication technologies (ICTs) in the past and present to shape the social and physical fabric of cities. From radio to social networking sites to smart phone apps to wifi mesh networks, among other platforms, we will explore the relationship between digital space and physical space. The course will be divided into four sections: I) ICTs and Open Government; II) ICTs and Community Development; III) ICTs, Local Activism, and Social Movements; and IV) Investigating the City through ICTs and Media. For undergraduate students only.
Time: Thursdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 26 Winthrop St, Room 101
Instructor: Staff
Syllabus:

UEP/CE/ENV 0207-01 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Analysis of environmental law and natural resource management at the federal, Tribal, state and local levels of government. The course is designed for those planning careers in environmental science, land use planning and environmental management and should be of value to others interested in learning about the structure of the nation's primary pollution statutes and mechanisms for managing and protecting natural resources.
Time: Mondays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 26 Winthrop St, Room 101
Instructor: Megan Herzog
Syllabus:

UEP 0221-01 CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY AND PLANNING
Examination of the climate change problem from the perspective of scientific evidence, policy responses and media coverage. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions and a wide range of mitigation and adaptation measures are explored and assessed. Overview of climate change solutions being taken or planned by governments, communities, and institutions (both for profit and nonprofit) and for major systems, e.g., transportation, buildings, and energy.
Time: Tuesdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Lane Hall, Room 100A
Instructor: Ann Rappaport
Syllabus:

UEP 0225-01 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
An exploration of the goals and practice of community engagement, from theory and history to methods and techniques. The course is offered online to reach a broad audience of students and practitioners. We use three case studies of public participation processes in Lowell's Hamilton Canal District, Boston's Chinatown, and Somerville. We view and discuss filmed sessions of public meetings and charrettes. Facilitators and participants of public participation events are interviewed for this course. Readings include academic texts, web sources and media coverage of the community engagement processes. Online course. Permission required for non-CAGS students. For permission, please contact Liat Racin.
Time: Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Online
Instructor: Liat Racin
Syllabus:

UEP 0233-01 REGIONAL PLANNING: TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES
As professionals addressing the most pressing urban, social, and environmental problems in society, planners and policy analysts are often faced with a paradox of scale: "local" is too narrow, "global" is too broad, and "national" is politically challenging. It is at the regional scale that some of the most innovative, exciting, and effective planning and public policy occurs. In this course, we explore the tools and techniques used in the professions of planning and public policy to address a wide range of issues where regionalism works: land use and development, transportation, energy, waste, and natural resources. Drawing on the state-of-the-art from practice, this course will help students to develop the knowledge and skills to be effective in their chosen planning and public policy careers.
Time: Wednesdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave
Instructor: Justin Hollander
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0261-01 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, PLANNING AND POLITICS
In a world where capitalism and an epistemology of technical rationality permeate every aspect of civic life, the knowledge systems of social groups such as indigenous peoples of the Americas and African slaves have been systematically oppressed, excluded and marginalized. This collaborative research seminar critically explores the idea of community development in a variety of settings as the "practice of freedom," a practice with profound implications for institutions of higher education and the resiliency of the regions in which they are located. The seminar positions higher education as the primary system of knowledge production and preservation, and a system with the ability to encourage and support new ways of knowing. Together, seminar participants will work to answer the question: what new, relevant knowledge can be shared and developed on the topic of community development through a diverse, dynamic and complex network of human relationships among people in the Global South and with people in the Global North? Their collaborative research will involve faculty, staff, students and community partners affiliated with Tufts University (Tufts), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh). Students will benefit from access to the resources of the Talloires Network (TN) at Tufts; MIT Community Innovators Lab (CoLab); and the Entrepreneurial Learning Center (CEM).
Time: Fridays, 9:30AM-12:00PM
Location: 72 Professors Row
Instructor: Lorlene Hoyt
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-10 GMOS: PROGRESS OR PERIL
The course covers the history of genetically modified crops, the impact of GMOs on agriculture, plant biotechnology's use of pesticides and herbicides; the patenting of seeds; debate over labeling GMOs; health and environmental risk assessment; regulatory policies in the US and Europe. Specific cases include: flavr Savr Tomato, ice-minus; bovine growth hormone (BGH); herbicide resistant crops; insect and disease resistant crops, transgenic animals. The course will investigate the locus of current controversies, examine whether there is consensus within science for the areas in public dispute, and explore the roles of politics, economics, and ethics in the GMO controversy.
Time: Tuesdays, 4:00-6:30PM
Location: 72 Professors Row
Instructor: Sheldon Krimsky
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-11 WATER SYSTEMS, SCIENCE, AND SOCIETY (WSSS) RESEARCH PRACTICUM
Students from a broad range of disciplines across the University – including Engineering, UEP, Friedman, Fletcher, the vet school, and the med school – work as a team, in the consultant/client mode, with a non-governmental organization to investigate the physical and social impacts of a complex water-related issue. The course includes classroom meetings spread across both semesters in which students refine the project and prepare for field work conducted over spring break. In the past two years, this has taken the team to the Bahamas, where the focus was water pollution and sewerage infrastructure, including public perceptions of the problem, along with its health and ecosystem impacts. The course is open only to students enrolled in the Tufts WSSS program, and is taught in cooperation with the UEP Field Projects: Planning & Practice (UEP-255) course.
Time: Fridays, 2:00-5:00PM
Location: Miner Hall, Room 110
Instructor: Ann Rappaport
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-18 JOBS THAT WORK
Why is it that people either have too little work to make a living or too much work to have a life? And why is it so rare for that work to be part of a gratifying life for individual workers, their families, and their communities? This course will investigate these questions and interventions to address them by drawing from two fields that are typically considered separately. The workforce development field tends to focus on low-wage workers and government sponsored policies. In contrast, those concerned about the challenges of work-life balance tend to focus on salaried, professional workers and interventions generally consist of practices adopted in private sector firms for their employees. The current economic crisis is an opportune setting for this inquiry. On the one hand, it exacerbates the social, urban, and environmental impact of ongoing trends in employment and wages, the organization of labor and corporations, and frictions between work life and home and civic life. It also highlights the limitations of contemporary policy and planning strategies for contending with these challenges. On the other hand, the crisis presents an opportunity to entertain new questions and new solutions – the intended product of this course.
Time: Wednesdays, 6:30-9:00PM
Location: Lane Hall, Room 100A
Instructor: Laurie Goldman
Syllabus:

Electives in Nonprofit Management and Professional Skills
GIS 0101-01 INTRODUCTION TO GIS (Undergraduate Students Only)
(Cross-listed as ENV 107)
Broad foundation of Geographic Information Systems theory, capabilities, technology, and applications. Topics include GIS data discovery, data structure and management; principles of cartographic visualization; and basic spatial analysis and modeling. Assignments concentrate on applying concepts covered in lectures and class exercises to term projects in each student's fields of interest.
Restrictions: Undergraduate Students Only
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1:30-2:45PM
Location: Tisch Library, Data Lab
Instructor: Sumeeta Srinivasan
Syllabus:

GIS 0102-01 ADVANCED GIS (Undergraduate Students Only)
(Cross-listed as ENV 197)
Design and use of spatial information systems to support analytical modeling in research and practice. Topics include the structure and integration of large data sets, relational database management, development of spatial data, integration of data into models and geoprocessing techniques, and basic scripting to support geospatial modeling. Recommendations: GIS (CIS) 101 or equivalent.
Restrictions: Undergraduate Students Only
Time: Tuesdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Tisch Library, Data Lab
Instructor:
Syllabus:


UEP 0230-01 NEGOTIATION, MEDIATION AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION (Graduate Students Only)
Techniques of negotiation and mediation applied to a broad range of conflict situations from interpersonal differences to labor relations, environmental disputes, and international relations. Combines practice in basic methods with theoretical and applied aspects of conflict resolution.
Restrictions: Graduate Students Only
Time: Thursdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Olin Language Arts Ctr, Rm 110, 002, 012
Instructor: Robert Burdick
Syllabus:

UEP 0232-01 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (UEP Students Only)
Broad foundation of GIS theory capabilities, technology, and applications. Topics include GIS data structure and management, geodesy and map projections, and various techniques for raster and vector spatial data analysis. Laboratory exercises concentrate on applying concepts presented in the lectures using Idrisi and ArcGIS.
Restrictions: UEP Students Only
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 12:00-1:15PM
Location: Tisch Library, Data Lab
Instructor: Barbara M. Parmenter
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0256-01/CD 0247-01 PROGRAM EVALUATION (Graduate Students Only)
(Co-listed with Department of Child Development)
Purposes for, and types and techniques of, program evaluation. Study of the evaluation process, including design, implementation, and dissemination, with focus on development of relevant data collection, analysis, and report writing skills. Emphasis on learning to match individual programs with particular models of evaluation.
Restrictions: Graduate Students Only
Time: Mondays, 6:30-9:00PM
Location: Eliot-Pearson, Room 163
Instructor: Mariah Contreras
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-02 COMMUNICATION & MEDIA (.5 CREDIT MODULE, 1ST HALF SEMESTER)
This module introduces communications and media theory and tools for policy and planning practitioners. Readings will cover various theories of communication and media and their roles in public policy and planning and formation of ideologies. Tools that will be introduced include strategic communications planning, narrative power, messaging and framing, media relations, and social media. Students will analyze current news and communications strategies of policy and planning practitioners. Students will have ample opportunities in class to practice and role play communications and media strategies (such as mock media interviews, writing op-eds from differing perspectives, story boarding, and creating a video blog).
Time: Thursdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location:
Instructor: Penn Loh
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-05 PLANNING FOR BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS
In a rapidly changing field, this design-based course will explore the innovations that are transforming urban areas across the country. It will touch on the nexus of policy and planning while delving into the technical side of creating livable communities. It is almost an "engineering for planners" class. What do we do about the car? How do we weave all modes of traffic into our transportation web? How has transport planning evolved in the Netherlands and the US over the decades? Students will learn how to create bicycle-friendly and pedestrian-friendly urban environments from both a local and a global perspective. Visual tools such as desire line analysis as well as photography and web based design applications will be used to characterize and address bicycle / pedestrian challenges. Students will use data analysis and apply cutting-edge design guidelines from the US and abroad to better serve pedestrians and cyclists in our communities while making safer streets for all modes. Teams will be formed to assess and redesign a roadway segment and apply course concepts. Students will come away with an analytical framework for identifying problems and opportunities in developing communities that are low-stress, safe, and comfortable for walking and biking.
Time: Mondays, 6:30-9:00PM
Location: Tisch Library, Room 310
Instructors: Mark Chase, Tom Bertulis
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-09 LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE
A survey course on the financial operations of local government. Focus on the concepts, techniques and law relating to municipal finance. Detailed analysis of the tools available to local governments as they seek to raise revenues for the provision of traditional services, including the property tax and fees (user and regulatory), but with emphasis on "new" strategies such as impact fees and development agreements. Discussion of trends toward "privatization" and the legal implications of transferring traditional municipal obligations to the private sector. Discussion of the policy implications found in "tax cap" states such as California and Massachusetts.
Time: Wednesdays, 4-6:30PM
Location: Lane Hall, Room 100A
Instructor: Jon Witten
Syllabus:

Directed Studies
UEP 0292-01 DIRECTED STUDIES
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

Thesis/Capstone
UEP 0295-01 THESIS
Prerequisites:
Register for only if spring is first thesis semester
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

UEP 0296-01 THESIS
Prerequisites: For 2nd semester thesis students
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

UEP 0297 CAPSTONE EXAM
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

Urban Studies Minor
UEP 0195-01 URBAN STUDIES CAPSTONE
Urban studies capstone project on an urban studies topic such as a research paper, an oral presentation, a video, a photographic exhibit, a fictional narrative, or other forms of study. Either one-half or one credit will be given at the discretion of a project committee consisting of two faculty members.
Restrictions: Undergraduates students
Instructors: UEP Faculty

Internship
UEP 0299 INTERNSHIP
The UEP internship enhances professional skills, allows the student to explore career options, broadens professional contacts, and provides a meaningful opportunity to work in a community. The student arranges the internship with an employing agency for a minimum of 150 hours of work. Additional requirements: completion of an internship agreement with the employing agency prior to beginning work; the supervisor's evaluation; the student's assessment of the experience.