Curriculum

Course Offerings

Fall 2017 | Spring 2017 | Fall 2016 | Summer 2016 | Spring 2016

Summer 2017

Required Core
UEP 0254-C QUANTITATIVE REASONING FOR POLICY AND PLANNING (TWELVE-WEEK SESSION: MAY 24 - AUGUST 11)
Required core course for M.A. and M.P.P. students. Introduction to the use of quantitative thinking. Designed to develop basic statistical skills as indispensable tools for policy research, planning and decision making. Students learn how to choose and apply statistical tools to data sources, when and how statistical tools can be used to analyze data, and how to interpret and understand others' quantitative research. Statistical software is used to facilitate learning through active application of statistical tools. Although prior coursework in statistics is not required, students are required to have a solid understanding of college-level algebra. Waiver permitted for students with an undergraduate major or substantial work-related experience in statistics subject to faculty approval.
Prerequisites: College-level algebra
Time: Tuesdays, 1:00 PM - 4:30 PM (12 Weeks)
Instructors: Alicia Doyle Lynch
Syllabus: Download PDF

Electives in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
UEP 0191-B PHILANTHROPY AND FUNDRAISING (SECOND SESSION: JULY 5 - AUGUST 11)
Overview of history and practice of organized philanthropy and fundraising concepts. Examination of opportunities and constraints of the various philanthropic sectors and the role of private philanthropic support in healthy nonprofit organizations. Strategic models and specific fundraising tools for planning and managing a sustainable nonprofit organization. Topics include funding strategy and research proposal development, private foundations, public foundations, corporate foundations and corporate giving and individual donors.
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Patricia Bonner-DuVal

UEP 0194-AA SUSTAINABILITY & THE FOOD INDUSTRY (FIRST SESSION: MAY 24 - JUNE 30)
This course examines the "middle" of the food system, poised between food producers and consumers, where the vast majority of food profits are made and spent. This is where food distributors, manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers transform the very nature of what we eat and establish the economic, social and environmental terms that shape much of the food system. By studying the dominant food system, we learn how established companies are adopting new policies and practices to become socially and environmentally responsible. We also explores the growing number of alternative programs and businesses that seek fundamental change by building a new, more reliable, equitable, and sustainable food system.
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Robert Guillemin

UEP 0194-BA URBAN POLITICAL ECOLOGY (SECOND SESSION: JULY 5 - AUGUST 11)
Political ecology offers a conceptual toolkit to explore the social and political relationships between people and the environment in various contexts and scales. For urban planners, ecologists, policy makers, and/or activists, this multi-disciplinary field offers a powerful critique of ecological change, and provides strategies for incorporating politics into otherwise seemingly apolitical discussions of urban nature. Students will engage with key debates that reinforce the interdependency of 'society' and 'nature', such as the links between environmental degradation and marginalization as well as the weaknesses of mainstream discourses on conservation and sustainability. Case studies will review how political interests shape our ideas of greenery, water, and food.
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Liat Racin
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0226-B SOCIAL JUSTICE & SUSTAINABILITY (ONLINE) (SECOND SESSION: JULY 5 - AUGUST 11)
This course engages students in a wide ranging exploration of the theories, practices, and opportunities for enhancing social justice and sustainability in the domains of public policy and urban planning. The course will be a forum for students to draw on their work experiences and educational experiences to more fully understand, articulate, and advocate for social justice and sustainability in policy and planning. Please note: There is a live, synchronous component to this course. Students will be expected to participate from 6:00 - 9:30 p.m. on Thursdays.
Time: Thursdays, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Michelle Holliday-Stocking
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0194-C PLANNING FOR PEDESTRIANS AND BICYCLES (TWELVE WEEK SESSION: MAY 24 - AUGUST 11)
In a rapidly changing field, this design-based course will explore the innovations that are transforming urban areas across the country. It will touch on the nexus of policy and planning while delving into the technical side of creating livable communities. It is almost an "engineering for planners" class. What do we do about the car? How do we weave all modes of traffic into our transportation web? How has transport planning evolved in the Netherlands and the US over the decades? Students will learn how to create bicycle-friendly and pedestrian-friendly urban environments from both a local and a global perspective. Visual tools such as desire line analysis as well as photography and web based design applications will be used to characterize and address bicycle / pedestrian challenges. Students will use data analysis and apply cutting-edge design guidelines from the US and abroad to better serve pedestrians and cyclists in our communities while making safer streets for all modes. Teams will be formed to assess and redesign a roadway segment and apply course concepts. Students will come away with an analytical framework for identifying problems and opportunities in developing communities that are low-stress, safe, and comfortable for walking and biking.
Time: Thursdays, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Mark Chase
Syllabus: Download PDF

Electives in Nonprofit Management and Professional Skills

UEP 0161-A WRITING AND PUBLIC COMMUNICATION (FIRST SESSION: MAY 24 - JUNE 30)
Presents strategies to improve writing and speaking in planning and public policy work. Helps students to find their own "voice," organize ideas, make points, reach their audience, and be creative through writing and speaking exercises, group discussions, brief lectures, and frequent individual conferences. Undergraduate students taking this course will receive a Pass/Fail grade.
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Instructors: Grace Talusan
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0230-A NEGOTIATION, MEDIATION, AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION (FIRST SESSION: MAY 24 - JUNE 30)
Techniques of negotiation and mediation applied to a broad range of conflict situations from interpersonal differences to labor relations, environmental disputes, and international relations. Combines practice in basic methods with theoretical and applied aspects of conflict resolution.
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Robert Burdick
Syllabus: Download PDF