Curriculum

Course Offerings

Summer 2017 | Fall 2016 | Summer 2016 | Spring 2016

Spring 2017

Spring 2017 Course Schedule >

Required Core
UEP 0251-01 ECONOMICS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY ANALYSIS
Required core course for M.A. and M.P.P. students. Economic concepts and tools of analysis for graduate students interested in public policy and planning. The emphasis of this course will be on microeconomic policy tools, although some macroeconomic topics will also be covered. The course will discuss the economic theories and techniques that can inform current policy debates such as global climate change, health care, employment, and economic inequality. The class will also demonstrate the limitations of economic analysis in guiding policy making. Although prior coursework in economics is not required, students are required to have a solid understanding of college-level algebra. Waiver permitted for students with an undergraduate major or substantial work-related experience in economics subject to faculty approval.
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9:00-10:15AM
Location: Anderson Hall, Nelson Auditorium
Instructor: Brian Roach
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0251-LA ECONOMICS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY ANALYSIS – LAB (OPTIONAL)
Time: Mondays, 5:00-6:30PM
Location: GIS Lab, Tisch Library
Instructor: Roach

UEP 0255-01 FIELD PROJECTS: PLANNING AND PRACTICE
Required core course for students in M.A. program. Practical planning and research experience in a community or governmental setting. Students are exposed to the realities of urban and environmental planning practice by working in teams for actual clients. Focuses on the interplay of expertise, social and political values, and professional relationships.
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00-12:00PM
Location: Sophia Gordon Hall, 97 Talbot Ave., 72 Professors Row
Instructors: Fran Jacobs, Christine Cousineau, Penn Loh
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0255-LA FIELD PROJECTS: PLANNING AND PRACTICE – LAB (OPTIONAL)
Time: Mondays, 9:00AM-12:00PM
Location: Tisch Library, Room 314
Instructors: Fran Jacobs, Christine Cousineau, Penn Loh

UEP 0289-01 INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR
Required core course for students in M.P.P. program. Challenges students to examine their academic learning, to demonstrate mastery of specific skills, and to examine the implications of policy development and implementation in complex and politically charged settings (half credit)
Time: Wednesdays, 4:30-5:45PM
Location: 97 Talbot Avenue
Instructor: Penn Loh
Syllabus: Download PDF


Electives in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
UEP 0094-01/ENV 0094-01 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, PLANNING AND POLITICS
(Co-listed with Environmental Studies) Open only to undergraduates, course introduces students to the concepts and techniques central to environmental policy, including the important roles played by politics and planning. Serves as a foundation for further work in Environmental Studies or as a broad overview of the issues key in the field. Structured around four varied case studies involving simulated environmental conflicts, each culminating in a "policy forum" consisting of presentations by student teams who represent specific interests (e.g., environmental advocates, legislators, agencies and corporations). Course also features guest presentations by other faculty from the graduate Department of Urban and Environmental policy and Planning.
Time: Thursdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Sophia Gordon
Instructor: Ann Rappaport
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0181-01/CD 0143-05 HOMELESSNESS IN AMERICA
This course examines the inter-connected social, economic, and political causes and effects of homelessness among individuals, families, communities, and social systems. It examines a range of government, nonprofit, and other efforts to address those problems. Students engage in a team project and have opportunities to volunteer at an organization that serves people experiencing homelessness.
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1:30-2:45PM
Location: Anderson Hall, Room 306
Instructor: Laurie Goldman
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0183-01/CD 0181-01 EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION POLICY AND PRACTICE
Study of child care within the context of social policy, child development, and early-childhood education. Examination of legislation, funding, programming, curriculum, and staffing; and how age, stage, gender, race, culture, and family lifestyle affect the child's experience of child care. Students use Tufts Educational Day Care Center as a laboratory. Prerequisite: Child Development 1 or Psychology 1, or consent.
Time: Thursdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Eliot-Pearson, Curr. Room
Instructor: John Lippitt

UEP 0188-01/CD 0188-01 SEMINAR ON GOVERNMENT AND THE FAMILY
(Co-listed with Department of Child Development) Government's role in promoting family development and well-being. Analysis of how various policies such as welfare, housing, community development, child support, and education impact children and families. CD 182 or consent required.
Time: Thursdays, 9:00AM-11:30AM
Location: Eliot-Pearson, Room 157
Instructor: Virginia Weisz

UEP 0194-01 URBAN DESIGN AND THE CHANGING SUBURBS
This course is intended to complement the urban orientation of other design courses at UEP by addressing the planning challenges posed by suburbs, in both their physical and social dimensions and the new emphasis on sustainable communities: a car-dependent, use-segregated environment and changing demographics.
Time: Tuesdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructor: Beth Lundell Garver
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0206-01 PLANNING FOR LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID)
Designed for students in the field of planning, engineering, and environmental policy. Provides a land use planning approach and specific site planning skills. Low impact development (LID) is a land use planning and a site planning approach that integrates conservation design principles and specific best management practices to minimize or eliminate the environmental impacts associated with development. Course will present planning approaches using actual case studies. A field trip to visit LID projects will be scheduled. Graduate
Standing or consent.
Time: Fridays, 9:00-11:30AM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructor: Scott Horsley

UEP/CE/ENV 0207-01 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Analysis of environmental law and natural resource management at the federal, Tribal, state and local levels of government. The course is designed for those planning careers in environmental science, land use planning and environmental management and should be of value to others interested in learning about the structure of the nation's primary pollution statutes and mechanisms for managing and protecting natural resources.
Time: Mondays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 72 Professors Row
Instructor: Megan Herzog
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0221-01 CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY AND PLANNING
Examination of the climate change problem from the perspective of scientific evidence, policy responses and media coverage. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions and a wide range of mitigation and adaptation measures are explored and assessed. Overview of climate change solutions being taken or planned by governments, communities, and institutions (both for profit and nonprofit) and for major systems, e.g., transportation, buildings, and energy.
Time: Tuesdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Anderson Hall, Room 210
Instructors:
Ann Rappaport
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0224-01/PH 0288-01 PUBLIC HEALTH AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
The epidemics of asthma, diabetes, and obesity have focused new attention on the role played by suburban sprawl, transportation, and other built environment features on public health. This course will explore the linkages between the built environment and public health from a policy and planning perspective. Students will develop analytical skills to evaluate modern day public health and built environment challenges, including mapping tools, health impact assessments, and healthy planning and design.
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays 10:30-11:45AM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructors: Mary E. Davis
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0233-01 REGIONAL PLANNING: TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES
As professionals addressing the most pressing urban, social, and environmental problems in society, planners and policy analysts are often faced with a paradox of scale: "local" is too narrow, "global" is too broad, and "national" is politically challenging. It is at the regional scale that some of the most innovative, exciting, and effective planning and public policy occurs. In this course, we explore the tools and techniques used in the professions of planning and public policy to address a wide range of issues where regionalism works: land use and development, transportation, energy, waste, and natural resources. Drawing on the state-of-the-art from practice, this course will help students to develop the knowledge and skills to be effective in their chosen planning and public policy careers.
Time: Mondays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructor: Justin Hollander
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0242-01 INTERNATIONAL PLANNING AND URBAN POLICY
This course introduces innovative approaches to improve both processes and outcomes of urban policy-making in different national and cultural contexts. Three broad themes organize the course: implications of globalization for cities and planning, economic development and urban projects, and planning for livable cities. Comparative analyses of planning practices and policies around the world, in such areas as mega projects, smart infrastructure and networks, integrated transportation and land use planning, urban agriculture and informal economies, and green cities.
Time: Thursdays 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Anderson Hall, Room 210
Instructor: Tej Karki
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0284-01 DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES
This elective course explores the many challenges of achieving 'just sustainabilities' through a critical, coherent and thought provoking overview of moves towards developing sustainable communities. The course focuses on: improving our quality of life and wellbeing; meeting the needs of both present and future generations (intra-generational and intergenerational equity); justice and equity in terms of recognition, process, procedure, and outcome; living within ecosystem limits (also called 'one planet living'). It investigates the theories of sustainable development and the tools and techniques and in what contexts we can move towards the ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, responsibility and social well-being characteristic of sustainable communities. Case studies are drawn from around the world.
Time: Thursdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Avenue
Instructor: Julian Agyeman
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-11 WATER SYSTEMS, SCIENCE, AND SOCIETY (WSSS) RESEARCH PRACTICUM
Students from a broad range of disciplines across the University – including Engineering, UEP, Friedman, Fletcher, the vet school, and the med school – work as a team, in the consultant/client mode, with a non-governmental organization to investigate the physical and social impacts of a complex water-related issue. The course includes classroom meetings spread across both semesters in which students refine the project and prepare for field work conducted over spring break. In the past two years, this has taken the team to the Bahamas, where the focus was water pollution and sewerage infrastructure, including public perceptions of the problem, along with its health and ecosystem impacts. The course is open only to students enrolled in the Tufts WSSS program, and is taught in cooperation with the UEP Field Projects: Planning & Practice (UEP-255) course.
Time: Fridays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Miner Hall, Room 221
Instructors: Ann Rappaport, John Durant

Electives in Nonprofit Management and Professional Skills
UEP 0230-01 NEGOTIATION AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Techniques of negotiation and mediation applied to a broad range of conflict situations from interpersonal differences to labor relations, environmental disputes, and international relations. Combines practice in basic methods with theoretical and applied aspects of conflict resolution.
Restrictions: Graduate Students Only
Time: Thursdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Olin Hall, Room 012, 002, 001
Instructors: Robert Burdick
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0232-01 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Broad foundation of GIS theory capabilities, technology, and applications. Topics include GIS data structure and management, geodesy and map projections, and various techniques for raster and vector spatial data analysis. Laboratory exercises concentrate on applying concepts presented in the lectures using Idrisi and ArcGIS.
Restrictions: UEP Students Only
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 12:00-1:15PM
Location: GIS Lab, Tisch Library
Instructors: Barbara M. Parmenter
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0253-01 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS AND MANAGEMENT
Tools and terminology needed by staff of public and nonprofit organizations to effectively manage financial resources. Emphasis on how to create tools and systems needed to analyze fiscal data and how to use the data to answer fundamental questions facing financial managers. Topics include budgeting, construction of cash flow projections, reading and analyzing financial statements, internal and external reporting requirements, internal controls, and borrowing and investment decisions.
Time: Tuesdays, 6:30-9:00PM
Location: Eaton Hall, Room 203
Instructors: David Orlinoff
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0256-01/CD 0247-01 PROGRAM EVALUATION
(Co-listed with Department of Child Development.) Purposes for, and types and techniques of, program evaluation. Study of the evaluation process, including design, implementation, and dissemination, with focus on development of relevant data collection, analysis, and report writing skills. Emphasis on learning to match individual programs with particular models of evaluation.
Restrictions: Graduate Students Only
Time: Mondays, 6:30-9:00PM
Location: Braker Hall, Room 223
Instructor: Mariah Contreras
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-01 EFFECTIVE ORGANIZATIONS (0.5 CREDITS, 1st HALF SEMESTER)
Course introduces skills for being an effective change agent in organizations dedicated to urban, environmental, and/or social issues. Case studies and hands-on exercises introduce ways of thinking and strategies for acting within public and nonprofit organizations. Topics to include: aligning organizational mission with external pressures and developments in the field; sustaining motivation and commitment; tapping the power of routines; learning from and with others; communication techniques; teamwork; and cultivating leadership and followership among staff, board, volunteers, and constituents. (The course may be taken in tandem with "Collaboration and Partnerships in Policy and Planning" but also works as a stand-alone module.)
Time: Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Tisch Library, Room 310
Instructor: Laurie Goldman
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-02 COMMUNICATION & MEDIA (.5 CREDIT MODULE, 1ST HALF SEMESTER)
This module introduces communications and media theory and tools for policy and planning practitioners. Readings will cover various theories of communication and media and their roles in public policy and planning and formation of ideologies. Tools that will be introduced include strategic communications planning, narrative power, messaging and framing, media relations, and social media. Students will analyze current news and communications strategies of policy and planning practitioners. Students will have ample opportunities in class to practice and role play communications and media strategies (such as mock media interviews, writing op-eds from differing perspectives, story boarding, and creating a video blog).
Time: Wednesdays 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructors: Penn Loh
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-03 COLLABORATION & PARTNERSHIPS (0.5 CREDITS, 2nd HALF SEMESTER)
Increasingly, policy and planning efforts span organizational boundaries. Working together allows organizations to take advantage of partners’ diverse resources, expertise, and constituencies to advance common goals. But collaborating is challenging; it consumes time and other resources and often exacerbates frictions among actors with divergent perspectives and priorities. Case studies offer lessons and introduce techniques regarding topics that include: responding to pressures to collaborate; choosing among different structures for working in partnership (eg. informal networks and alliances; planned coordination; formal contracts and coalitions; mergers); cultivating trust, leveraging difference, and managing conflict; and planning and distributing the tasks of partnership. (The course may be taken in tandem with "Effective Organizations and Leadership Development" but also works as a stand-alone module.)
Time: Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Tisch Library, Room 310
Instructor: Laurie Goldman

Directed Studies
UEP 0292-01 DIRECTED STUDIES
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on  SIS

Thesis/Capstone
UEP 0295-01 THESIS
Prerequisites: Register for only if spring is first thesis semester
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

UEP 0296-01 THESIS
Prerequisites: For 2nd semester thesis students
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

UEP 0297 CAPSTONE EXAM
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

Urban Studies Minor
UEP 0195-01 URBAN STUDIES CAPSTONE
Urban studies capstone project on an urban studies topic such as a research paper, an oral presentation, a video, a photographic exhibit, a fictional narrative, or other forms of study. Either one-half or one credit will be given at the discretion of a project committee consisting of two faculty members.
Restrictions: Undergraduates students
Instructors: UEP Faculty

Internship
UEP 0299 INTERNSHIP
The UEP internship enhances professional skills, allows the student to explore career options, broadens professional contacts, and provides a meaningful opportunity to work in a community. The student arranges the internship with an employing agency for a minimum of 150 hours of work. Additional requirements: completion of an internship agreement with the employing agency prior to beginning work; the supervisor's evaluation; the student's assessment of the experience.