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Summer 2016

Required Core
UEP 0254-C QUANTITATIVE REASONING FOR POLICY AND PLANNING (TWELVE-WEEK SESSION: MAY 25 - AUGUST 12, 2016)
Required core course for M.A. and M.P.P. students. Introduction to the use of quantitative thinking. Designed to develop basic statistical skills as indispensable tools for policy research, planning and decision making. Students learn how to choose and apply statistical tools to data sources, when and how statistical tools can be used to analyze data, and how to interpret and understand others' quantitative research. Statistical software is used to facilitate learning through active application of statistical tools. Although prior coursework in statistics is not required, students are required to have a solid understanding of college-level algebra. Waiver permitted for students with an undergraduate major or substantial work-related experience in statistics subject to faculty approval.
Prerequisites: College-level algebra
Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM (12 Weeks)
Instructors: Alicia Doyle Lynch

Electives in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
UEP 0194-A COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (ONLINE): ADVANCED TECHNIQUES, EXAMPLES & OUTCOMES (FIRST SESSION: MAY 25 - JULY 1, 2016)
An exploration of the goals and practice of community engagement, from theory and history to methods and techniques. The course is offered online to reach a broad audience of students and practitioners. We use three case studies of public participation processes in Lowell's Hamilton Canal District, Boston's Chinatown, and Somerville. We view and discuss filmed sessions of public meetings and charrettes. Facilitators and participants of public participation events are interviewed for this course. Readings include academic texts, web sources and media coverage of the community engagement processes.
Time: Anytime
Instructors: Christine Cousineau

UEP 0194-AC CITIES AND URBAN DESIGN (FIRST SESSION: MAY 25 - JULY 1, 2016)
The course examines how cities evolved over time and what attempts continue to be made to plan them. From early settlements to today, cities have grown through trade, war, empire, migration and market forces. Geography, economy and public policy have shaped cities under democratic, monarchial, theocratic, socialist and communist rule. Theories abound about how they should be planned and designed, expanded or concentrated, demolished and restarted, escaped or revived. The course ends with today’s urban design concepts and movements. Students post their comments on the readings, write two short essays, and design their ideal community.
Time: Tuesday, Thursday 1 - 4:30 PM
Instructors: Christine Cousineau

UEP 0194-B PLANNING FOR PEDESTRIANS AND BICYCLES (SECOND SESSION: JULY 5 - AUGUST 12, 2016)
Walking and bicycling form the foundation of a low-cost, healthy and sustainable transportation system. This design-based course will give students an analytical framework for identifying problems and opportunities in developing low-stress, safe bicycle and pedestrian facilities. A large part of the class will be focused on using data to quantify problems and opportunities that can be addressed through better planning and design of our communities and the streets that serve them. Visual tools including desire line analysis, photography and web based design tools will also be used to both characterize problems and propose solutions. In addition we will examine several international case studies to see how non-motorized policies have advanced social, economic and political goals in different contexts.
Time: Tuesday, Thursday 6 - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Mark Chase

Electives in Nonprofit Management and Professional Skills

UEP 0161-A WRITING AND PUBLIC COMMUNICATION (FIRST SESSION: MAY 25 - JULY 1, 2016)
Persuasive, accurate, readable writing is crucial to Public Policy and Planning and to active citizenship. Course offers techniques for understanding the needs of multiple audiences, for framing and organizing ideas, and developing a "voice" that will influence readers in the "real world." Tools for critical and creative thinking, supportive feedback, and audience awareness through short weekly writing assignments including at least three drafts of your chosen longer writing project in public communication and a short memo. This term also: a closer look at policy memos as written in state government.
Time: Monday, Wednesday 6 - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Louise Dunlap

UEP 0230-A NEGOTIATION AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION (FIRST SESSION: MAY 25 - JULY 1, 2016)
Techniques of negotiation and mediation applied to a broad range of conflict situations from interpersonal differences to labor relations, environmental disputes, and international relations. Combines practice in basic methods with theoretical and applied aspects of conflict resolution.
Time: Tuesday, Thursday 6 - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Robert Burdick