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Associated Professor Justin B. Hollander celebrated the 10th episode in his iTunes podcast
October 25, 2017
Justin B. Hollander, A96, an associate professor of urban and environmental policy and planning, celebrated a milestone: the 10th episode in his iTunes podcast "Cognitive Urbanism." The episode covers Prof. Hollander's research with his graduate students using a social listening approach (social media data mining) to historic preservation in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Associate Professor Justin B. Hollander wrote a new book examining the urban population decline
October 10, 2017
Justin B. Hollander, A96, Associate Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, wrote a new book "An Ordinary City: Planning for Growth and Decline in New Bedford, Massachusetts" (Palgrave/Springer). The book examines urban population decline detailing the politics, environment, planning strategies, and history of New Bedford, MA.

Professor Julian Agyeman's new co-edited book, Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social Justice: From Loncheras to Lobsta Love
September 11, 2017
Professor Julian Agyeman, together with Caitlin Matthews (MA/MS 2017) and Hannah Sobel (MA/MS 2017), have just published a new co-edited book, Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social Justice: From Loncheras to Lobsta Love (MIT Press). The food truck on the corner could be a brightly painted old-style lonchera offering tacos or an upscale mobile vendor serving lobster rolls. Customers range from gastro-tourists to construction workers, all eager for food that is delicious, authentic, and relatively inexpensive. Although some cities that host food trucks encourage their proliferation, others throw up regulatory roadblocks. This book examines the food truck phenomenon in North American cities from Los Angeles to Montreal, taking a novel perspective: social justice. It considers the motivating factors behind a city's promotion or restriction of mobile food vending, and how these motivations might connect to or impede broad goals of social justice.

The contributors investigate the discriminatory implementation of rules, with gentrified hipsters often receiving preferential treatment over traditional immigrants; food trucks as part of community economic development; and food trucks' role in cultural identity formation. They describe, among other things, mobile food vending in Portland, Oregon, where relaxed permitting encourages street food; the criminalization of food trucks by Los Angeles and New York City health codes; food as cultural currency in Montreal; social and spatial bifurcation of food trucks in Chicago and Durham, North Carolina; and food trucks as a part of Vancouver, Canada's, self-branding as the "Greenest City." Learn more >

Professor Sheldon Krimsky interviewed on Boston Public Radio
August 6, 2017
Professor Sheldon Krimsky was interviewed on Boston Public Radio recently about the ethical implications of the new study published in Nature Journal last week about the editable human embryo.

Tufts alum Grace Talusan, J94, wins the 2017 Restless Books Prize
August 4, 2017
Congratulations to UEP lecturer and Tufts alum Grace Talusan, J94, for winning the 2017 Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing for Nonfiction! The Body Papers is a memoir that chronicles her life as a Filipina immigrant and survivor of trauma and illness. Grace taught the writing course this summer at UEP (UEP 161: Writing and Public Communication).

Urban Social Listening: Using Social Media Data for Urban and Regional Planning
Monday, January 23, 2017, 5pm-6pm Eastern Time
72 Professors Row, Tufts University, Medford, MA
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