Faculty in the News - Academic Year 2019-2020

Summer 2020

US Stocks-S&P 500 hits record high on Amazon boost
Aug 18, 2020
Reuters
Brian Bethune, lecturer, Department of Economics, is quoted about recent stock market gains, saying "the economy, generally speaking, is doing better than what people had expected."

Pandemic Electric Bills Are Searing Hot, As Families Stay Home
Aug 17, 2020
National Public Radio
Steve Cicala, assistant professor, Department of Economics, is quoted about the increase in home electricity consumption during the COVID-19 pandemic.

New Zealand delays election amid COVID-19 outbreak | The World from PRX
Aug 17, 2020
Public Radio International
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, discusses New Zealand's decision to delay its upcoming national elections, noting the differences between the political systems in New Zealand and the United States. 

California progressives' mantra for Democratic convention: 'Challenge Biden'
Aug 16, 2020
San Francisco Chronicle
Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies Brian Schaffner's analysis of voters who cast ballots for Bernie Sanders in the 2016 Democratic primary and then Donald Trump in the presidential election is referenced in this article. 

Honey bees can't practice social distancing, so they stay healthy in close quarters by working together
Aug 14, 2020
The Conversation
Philip Stark, associate professor, Department of Biology, co-authors this piece with Rachael Bonoan, AG18, on how honey bees work collectively to keep colonies healthy. A video shows hives on the Cummings School campus that were used for research.  

Brian A. Hatcher on his book Hinduism Before Reform
Aug 12, 2020
Rorotoko
Brian Hatcher, Packard Chair of Theology, Department of Religion, was interviewed about his new book Hinduism Before Reform (Harvard University Press, 2020). 

Environmental Racism: Why Does It Still Exist? 
Aug 12, 2020
impakter.com
Julian Agyeman, professor, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, is quoted throughout this article on environmental racism in the UK.

COVID-19 Risk Through a Psychosocial Lens
Jul 31, 2020
Sirius XM
Adolfo Cuevas, assistant professor of community health, was a guest on SiriusXM's "Doctor Radio" to discuss the impact of COVID-19 in minority populations, as well as his work in obesity research.

Are LGBT women less likely to get mammograms? 
Jul 30, 2020
Aunt Minnie
This article discusses the findings of new research led by Madina Agénor, Gerald R. Gill Assistant Professor of Race, Culture, and Society, Department of Community Health, who examined mammogram frequency among U.S. women through the lens of both sexual orientation identity and race/ethnicity.

Coping with the COVID-19 crisis
Jul 30, 2020
www.pearsoned.com
Professors of Psychology Lisa Shin and Sam Sommers discuss their new course, "The Science of Coping."

In the Studio: Ethan Murrow
Jul 30, 2020
EYE ON ART
This article highlights recent work from Ethan Murrow, professor of the practice, SMFA at Tufts. 

What is consciousness? Philosopher, Dan Dennett
Jul 28, 2020
New Scientist
University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy Dan Dennett explores the nature of consciousness in this interview. 

When art goes viral
Jul 22, 2020
The Boston Globe
This article highlights SMFA's Chantal Zakari's new book Drop Dead Gorgeous which tells a story using coronavirus imagery from around the world. Zakari is quoted.

COVID-19 Pandemic Shows Telecommuting Can Help Fight Climate Change
Jul 22, 2020
Scientific American
Steve Cicala, assistant professor, Department of Economics, says that there was a "very fast and distinctive decline in electricity consumption as the shutdowns were occurring" in this article about the environmental impact of the rise in telecommuting due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Arts Education And Racial Equity: A Call To Action
Jul 20, 2020
WGBH
Barbara Wallace Grossman, professor, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, co-authors this piece urging Massachusetts lawmakers to financially support and protect arts education instruction across the state.

Frost & Sullivan IDs Five New Technologies to Power Research Across Preclinical Disease Models
Jul 16, 2020
BioSpace
This overview of innovative technologies includes researh from A&S biologists Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor, and Vaibhav Pav, that found damaged brain cells in frog embryos caused by nicotine exposure can be repaired and even prevented by mapping and manipulating the bioelectric patterns and signaling of the brain. 

India's drag queens put politics front and center
Jul 16, 2020
Nikkei Asian Review
Kareem Khubchandani, Mellon Bridge Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, comments on the societal role of drag artists in India. 

History Lessons: Can We Learn from the Past? 
Jul 15, 2020
Digital Humanities Now
Rosemary C.R. Taylor, associate professor, Department of Sociology, compares COVID-19 with other major diseases in world history, highlighting lessons that could help in our pandemic recovery.

Biggest questions parents and educators have about colleges reopening
Jul 12, 2020
Business Insider
Natasha Warikoo, professor, Department of Sociology, is quoted throughout this article exploring issues related to college reopening plans. Warikoo is the author of The Diversity Bargain: And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities.

Polls show Trump is losing to Joe Biden. They said the same thing 4 years ago against Hillary Clinton
Jul 12, 2020
USA Today
Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies Brian Schaffner's analysis of voters who cast ballots for Bernie Sanders in the 2016 Democratic primary and then Donald Trump in the presidential election is referenced in this article.

Poesía, Testimonio y Latinos en Estados-Unidos
Jul 12, 2020
Diario UNO
This column mentions that Jose Antonio Mazzotti, King Felipe VI of Spain Professor of Spanish Culture and Civilization, Department of Romance Studies, established the First International Latin and Latin American Book Fair, which was postponed from its April date due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The electric hum of life may have originated with primordial lightning
Jul 10, 2020
LiveScience.com
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, comments on research that suggests primordial lightning could be for the "electrical hum" that exists in most animals. 

Survey: Only 57 percent would get COVID-19 vaccine, if available
Jul 10, 2020
WHDH
The Tufts Research Group on Equity in Health, Wealth and Civic Engagement has found that only 57% of Americans would get a COVID-19 vaccine if it were available today. 

'Newton is not a utopia.' Task force to review policing
Jul 9, 2020
The Boston Globe
This article mentions that Sonja Spears, lecturer, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, is leading a Newton task force to review the city's police force.

Elizabeth Warren tiptoes into Markey Kennedy primary fights
Jul 8, 2020
The Boston Globe
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, comments on how Senator Elizabeth Warren's political relationships with both Senator Edward Markey and Representative Joseph P. Kennedy III, rival primary candidates, put her in "an awkward situation."

Yes, China Could Invade Taiwan (And Then Comes the Hard Part)
July 9, 2020
The National Interest
Michael Beckley is quoted from his 2017 article "The Emerging Military Balance in East Asia: How China's Neighbors Can Check Chinese Naval Expansion."

Will George Floyd's death reshape discourse on racism in Britain?
July 6, 2020
Daily Sabah
Kris Manjapra, associate professor, Department of History, is quoted in this article exploring how protests associated with the police killing of George Floyd, and other race-related issues in the United States may influence how racism is viewed in Britain.

'A Conflicted Cultural Force': What It's Like to Be Black in Publishing
July 1, 2020
The New York Times
Kerri Greenidge, Mellon Assistant Professor, Department of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora is among the contributors sharing person experiences with racism in the field of book publishing and academia. 

Where electricity bills are set to surge around the U.S. this summer
July 1, 2020
CBS News 
Steve Cicala, assistant professor, Department of Economics, is quoted in this article about energy usage and electricity costs in the U.S. during COVID-19. 

Data Companies Track Our Pandemic Patterns
June 30, 2020
Land Lines
Justin Hollander, A96, professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, was interviewed in an article for the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy's magazine Land Line. 

New Episode of Resources Radio: “How COVID-19 Has Powered Down the US Economy, with Steve Cicala”
Jun 30, 2020
Resources for the Future
Steve Cicala, assistant professor, Department of Economics, is featured in a podcast about the U.S. economy during COVID-19. 

SciLine hosts intersectional briefing regarding LGBTQ+, Black communities
Jun 29, 2020
Windy City Times
Madina Agénor, Gerald R. Gill Assistant Professor of Race, Culture, and Society, Department of Community Health, participated in an online conversation about intersectionality between racial and LGBTQ+ identities, and the resulting effects on mental health. 

Researchers use electric fields to herd cells like flocks of sheep
Jun 24, 2020
Phys.org
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, comments on research showing that groups of cells can be precisely moved by electric fields that mimic those found in the body during healing.

Land loss has plagued black American since emancipation -- is it time to look again at 'black commons' and collective ownership? 
Jun 18, 2020
The Conversation
Julian Agyeman, professor of urban and environmental policy and planning, co-authors this piece examining how a historical lack of land ownership has negatively impacted Black wealth, and the current opportunity for creating collective economic development. 

Bernie Sanders' California forces want Rep. Ro Khanna--not Newsom--to lead state delegration
Jun 17, 2020
San Francisco Chronicle
Data from Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies Brian Schaffner's analysis of voters who cast ballots for Bernie Sanders in the 2016 Democratic primary and then Donald Trump in the presidential election is referenced in this article. 

Celebrating 50 years: Pride marches on
Jun 12, 2020
The Boston Globe
Neil Miller, lecturer, Department of English, writes this opinion piece highlighting notable moments in the LGBTQ movement since the first Pride parade 50 years ago. Miller is the author of "Out of the Past: Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present."

Calgary's tough choices: Gamble on growth or gamble on retreat
Jun 12, 2020
CBC.CA News
Justin Hollander, A96, professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, comments on the challenges facing Calgary, Alberta, as the city struggles to adapt in the wake of economic shifts due to the coronavirus pandemic.

This Essay Collection is a Roadmap Toward A Healthier Post-COVID Food System
Jun 11, 2020
Food Tank
This overview of essays related to a post-COVID food system includes a piece from Julian Agyeman, professor, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, and GSAS student Alexandra Duprey on protecting undocumented immigrants during the COVID-19 pandemic. A link to the full essay is included.

The partisan chasm over 'systemic racism' is on full display
Jun 8, 2020
CNN.com
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, is quoted throughout this article examining American public opinion on race and how current divides might affect President Trump's support in the November election. Schaffner's research comparing election results in 2016 and 2018 is also mentioned. 

Tufts professor raises $10,000 for bail bonds with musicology livestream
Jun 7, 2020
The Boston Globe
Stephan Pennington, associate professor, Department of Music, gave an online lecture on Black music history and civil rights as a fundraiser for the nonprofit The Bail Project, raising more than $10,000. A link to the lecture is included.

May surprising job gain dents view that Fed will stay at zero for years
Jun 5, 2020
MarketWatch
Brian Bethune, lecturer, Department of Economics, comments on the Federal Reserve's plans for interest rates as the economy recovers from the coronavirus pandemic.

Tufts University filmmaker Jennifer Burton throws levity in the ugly face of ageism
May 27, 2020
The Somerville Times
Jennifer Burton, professor of the practice, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, discusses the new comedy web series she developed with her sisters, inspired by the real-life acting pursuits of their parents.

Poor and black 'invisible cyclists' need to be part of post-pandemic transport planning too
May 27, 2020
The Conversation
Julian Agyeman discusses the critical need for bike advocates and city planner/officials to recognize and address the political and socio-economic barriers facing low-income and minority cyclists. A 2019 analysis of bike equity in Greater Boston by UEP/GSAS students is also referenced. 

Returning Bioelectric Brain Signals In Frog Embryos Reverses Birth Defects
May 26, 2020
IFL Science
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, is quoted about new research, alongside Vaibhav Pai, finding that damage to developing frog embryos caused by nicotine exposure can be repaired and even prevented by mapping and manipulating the bioelectric patterns and signaling of the brain. 

Tufts professor--and her sisters--release Web comedy series 'Old Guy'
May 24, 2020
The Boston Globe
Jennifer Burton, professor of the practice, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, discusses the new comedy web series she developed with her sisters, inspired by the real-life acting pursuits of their parents. Burton notes that Tufts film students assisted in the editing process. 

Spring 2020

Bernie Sanders supporters reluctantly turn to Joe Biden, fueled by their dislike of Donald Trump
May 17, 2020
USA Today
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, is quoted in this article examining who Bernie Sanders supporters will vote for in the 2020 presidential election. Schaffner's 2017 Cooperative Congressional Election study is also mentioned. 

Required Reading
May 16, 2020
Hyperallergic
A TedxTufts talk from Kareem Khubchandani, Mellon assistant professor, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, is featured in Hyperallergic's required reading section. 

Sibling Non-Rivalry
May 15, 2020
Talkhouse
Jennifer Burton, professor of the practice, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, and her sisters Maria, Ursula, Gabrielle, and Charity Burton discuss Five Sisters Productions, the boutique indepedent film and commercial production house which they run together. 

In their own words: How artists are staying productive (and mostly positive) during the pandemic
May 14, 2020
The Boston Globe
Maurice Parent, professor of the practice, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, is featured in this story about how artists are adapting to life during the pandemic.

Papal academy fosters ethics, multidisciplinary alliances in AI debate
May 11, 2020
Crux
Richard Lerner, Bergstrom Professor of Applied Developmental Science, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, is a co-author of new collaborative research examining how the Catholic Church can contribute to the dialogue regarding artificial intelligence and machine ethics.

COVID-19 Pandemic Obituaries
May 11, 2020
TRT World
TRT World, an international TV station based in Turkey, invited Silvia Bottinelli, senior lecturer, SMFA at Tufts, to speak about Germano Celant, the founder of Arte Povera, for a program dedicated to artists and art world personalities who passed away due to COVID-19. 

Sea levels could rise more than a metre by 2100, experts say
May 8, 2020
The Guardian
This article mentions that Tufts was part of a collaborative study, co-authored by Assistant Professor of Earth and Ocean Sciences Andrew Kemp, that found sea-level rise is faster than previously believed.

Remote Learning Is A Challenge, Especially For Students In Districts With Fewer Resources
May 6, 2020
WGBH News
Natasha Warikoo, professor, Department of Sociology, comments in this radio segment and accompanying article exploring the impact of economic disparity on remote learning.

The pandemic exposes realities of failing to combat global censorship
May 6, 2020
The Hill 
Katrina Lantos Swett, lecturer, Department of Political Science, writes this opinion piece on the importance of internet freedom and the need to fund efforts to fight global internet censorship.

As coronavirus infections peak, profit-driven hospital systems must be held accountable
Apr. 30, 2020
The Boston Globe
Alecia McGregor, assistant professor, Department of Community Health, co-authors this opinion piece on the need for achieving health equity in the distribution of hospital resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Inspirational Women in STEM and Tech: "It's not about being a woman in STEM; It's about Marina in STEM," With Marina Umaschi Bers of Tufts University
Apr. 30, 2020
Medium
Marina Umaschi Bers, professor and chair, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, discusses her work, her role as a mentor, and her approach to leadership in this "Lessons From Inspirational Women in STEM and Tech" interview.

Books About Post-World War I Offer A Model For Life After Coronavirus, Experts Say
Apr. 28, 2020
Bustle
John Lurz, associate professor, Department of English, is quoted extensively about the parallels between the current coronavirus pandemic situation and depictions from modernist, post-WWI literature.

Renowned Academics, Journalists Call for Jang Editor's Release in Pakistan
Apr. 28, 2020
The Wire
Ayesha Jalal, Mary Richardson Professor of History, Department of History, is among those who have endorsed a statement for the release and fair trial of Jang Media Group Editor-in-Chief Mir Shakil-ur-Rahman, who has been imprisoned since March 12 in Pakistan.

Greater Worcester's population growth stagnated in 2019, as immigration dropped
Apr. 27, 2020
WBJournal.com
Justin Hollander, A96, professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, is quoted in this article on how migration trends are impacting Worcester's economy.

Julian Agyeman: A Visionary for Just Sustainabilities
Apr. 23, 2020
National Recreation and Park Association
Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning Julian Agyeman discusses the concept of "just sustainabilities" and how it applies to developing inclusive parks and recreation spaces.

DNA may not be life's instruction book -- just a jumbled list of ingredients
Apr. 23, 2020
SpaceRef
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, comments on two new papers that outline a new theoretical framework for heredity and offer a new understanding of DNA.

All the wild, creative, and just plain funny works Massachusetts art students are making from home
Apr. 17, 2020
Boston Globe
SMFA's Floor van de Velde comments on how she has kept her remote digital fabrication students engaged through speculative design, asking them to "think about how to solve large social problems."

American Association for Ukrainian Studies protests Ukraine's cuts to funding for scholarly, cultural institutions
Apr. 17, 2020
The Ukrainian Weekly
Oxana Shevel, associate professor, Department of Political Science, is among the signatories of an open letter from the American Association for Ukrainian Studies regarding budget cuts following the formation of Ukraine's Stabilization Fund.

From Virtue Signaling to Politics
Apr. 17, 2020
The American Prospect
This is a review of Associate Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh's new book Politics is for Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change.

Teachers Just As Likely To Be Racially Biased As Anyone Else
Apr. 15, 2020
Forbes
Natasha Warikoo, professor, Department of Sociology, is co-author of a collaborative new study that found teachers are no less likely to be racially biased than non-teachers. Warikoo notes that "well-intentioned teachers may be subject to biases they are not entirely conscious of."

Tufts University becomes first urban Bee Campus USA in Massachusetts
Apr. 15, 2020
Medford - WickedLocal.com
Tufts is now certified as an affiliate of the Bee Campus USA program, an initiative supported by the Tufts University Green Fund and Tufts Pollinator Initiative. Elizabeth Crone, professor, Department of Biology, says that "urban pollinator gardens are the next frontier for conserving insect diversity in the 21st century."

Coronavirus spawns a new model for biosecurity
Apr. 15, 2020
Axios
This article references new collaborative research led by A&S research professor Sam Weiss Evans that suggests the need to rethink biosecurity governance, particularly in light of lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Remotely Hands-On
Apr. 14, 2020
Inside Higher Ed
Julia Svoboda Gouvea, assistant professor, Department of Education, and lecturer in the Department of Biology Lauren Crowe, are quoted about the challenges of teaching typically hands-on science courses and lab work via remote learning noting, "you're going to have to tell students it's OK not to understand this within the first five minutes of opening up a webpage."

Thought Leadership in a Time of Challenge
Apr. 6, 2020
Patheos Blogs
Research Professor of Music Rabbi Jeffrey Summit shares his perspective about how thought leadership ideas within the Jewish community can "speak to the challenges that we face at this moment as we do our best to live with integrity, purpose and compassion" during the coronavirus pandemic.

Meet the Xenobots, Virtual Creatures Brought to Life
Apr. 3, 2020
The New York Times
Michael Levin,Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, and Douglas Blackiston, scientist in the Levin Lab, in collaboration with the University of Vermont researchers, have developed living, programmable robots (xenobots) created with skin and heart cells from African clawed frogs. Levin and Blackiston are both quoted, and several photos and videos are featured.

Fourth cohort of Boston Artists-in-Residence announced
Apr. 3, 2020
Area-Info.net
SMFA's Anthony Romero has been named a 2020 City of Boston Artist-in-Residence (AIR). The program offers artists the opportunity to "explore, critique, and re-imagine City initiatives at the intersection of civil service, social justice, and artistic practice."

Partisanship is the strongest predictor of coronavirus response
Mar. 31, 2020
Vox
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, is quoted from a March 21 New York Times article on the divide between Democratic and Republican views of the coronavirus pandemic, saying, “while the effects of partisanship are incredibly pronounced, I think they also hit their limits.”

Smart Bandage Speeds Wound Healing
Mar. 22, 2020
Business Computing World
Michael Levin,Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, initiated collaborative work, funded by a $16 million Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) contract, to develop bioelectronic bandage technology to improve the healing of serious wounds.

MetroWest climate group looks at carbon tax in Wayland meeting
Mar. 21, 2020
MetroWest Daily News
Gilbert Metcalf, John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, gave a lecture on the history of carbon taxes, organized by MetroWest Climate Solutions Group on March 10.

Red vs. Blue on Coronavirus Concern: The Gap Is Still Big but Closing
Mar. 21, 2020
The New York Times
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, shares his observations on the divide between Democratic and Republican views of the coronavirus pandemic. 

What's Happening to the Monarch Butterfly Population
Mar. 20, 2020
The New York Times
Professor of Biology Elizabeth Crone is quoted in this article on the declining populations of western North American monarch butterflies. Tufts biologists are among the collaborators on research efforts examining this issue.

Unemployment Benefit Expansions: A Guide for Policy Responses in the Wake of COVID-19
Mar. 20, 2020
Medium
Elizabeth Pancotti outlines why drastic, immediate changes to unemployment insurance system in the United States are needed to "stabilize the American economy, incentivize compliance with public health guidance, and keep American families financially secure."

WiFi-Equipped Plants Need No Green Thumb
Mar. 20, 2020
Blogs - WGBH
Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning Julian Agyeman comments on the indoor growing movement in this Innovation Hub radio segment (around the 10:20 mark). A link to his book Cultivating Food Justice also appears on a list of recommended reading.

Why Worrying About a Cognitive Test Leads to Poorer Performance
Mar. 19, 2020
Next Avenue
Ayanna Thomas, professor of psychology, is quoted throughout this article on how to decrease stress about memory loss, particularly prior to cognitive screening.

School and Daycare Closures Present A Challenge For Many Parents
Mar. 19, 2020
WGBH News
In this radio segment and accompanying article, Marina Bers, professor and chair, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, gives parents advice on educational opportunities while their children are home from school due to coronavirus closures.

Sanders Supporters Look Less Likely to Defect This Year Than in 2016
Mar. 17, 2020
Morning Consult
Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies Brian Schaffner's analysis of voters who cast ballots for Bernie Sanders in the 2016 Democratic primary and then Donald Trump in the presidential election is referenced in this article.

Wicked Challenges: Future of Cities & Philanthropy series, Part 1
Mar. 17, 2020
Medium
Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning Julian Agyeman is quoted in this article about the challenges facing 21st century cities, saying that "who can belong in cities will determine what our cities become."

What to Let the Kids Watch When You're All Stuck at Home
Mar. 16, 2020
The Wall Street Journals
Susan Napier, Goldthwaite Professor of Rhetoric, Department of International Literary and Cultural Studies, is among the experts who contributed to the Wall Street Journal's curated list of films, online games, and other digital offerings to help engage families during this period of social isolation.

Investing in healthy workers can help offset corona crisis setbacks
Mar. 16, 2020
The Hill
In an op-ed piece for The Hill, Justin Hollander, A96, professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, says investing in healthy workers can help offset the impacts of the coronavirus crisis.

Sanders voters helped Trump win the White House. Could they do it again?
Mar. 8, 2020
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, comments on whether Bernie Sanders, as the Democratic presidential nominee, would have support from those who voted for him in the 2016 primary against Hillary Clinton but voted for Donald Trump in the general election. Findings from Schaffner's collaborative 2016 Cooperative Congressional Election Study are also mentioned.

How gender has played a role in the Democratic primary race so far
Mar. 8, 2020
The National
This article mentions research from Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, about the role of sexist attitudes on predicting voter choices.

Christina Maranci to Present New Discoveries at Ani Cathedral at NAASR
Mar. 6, 2020
The Armenian Weekly
Christina Maranci,  Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Professor of Armenian Art and Architecture, will give the lecture “New Discoveries at Ani Cathedral” on March 25 at the National Association for Armenian Studies and Research in Belmont.

Free Cyntoia
Mar. 5, 2020
C-SPAN
A video of the March 5 Tisch College Distinguished Speaker Series conversation between Cyntoia Brown-Long and Hilary Binda, senior lecturer, School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts, with an introduction by Tisch Dean Alan Solomont.

A lesson in civics or indoctrination? Deciding whether to bring kids to political protests. 
Mar. 5, 2020
The Washington Post
Tama Leventhal, Professor, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, comments on parents taking their children to political protests, noting that it "teaches them a sense of agency and to look beyond family, school, and community to larger societal issues."

With Joe Biden Emerging As Frontrunner, Here's Where The Democratic Race Stands
Mar. 4, 2020
WBUR News
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, assesses the state of Democratic candidates in the presidential primary election after Super Tuesday, noting that the divide between progressives and moderates within the Democratic part "runs all the way through Democratic party history, we've had that conflict forever, and this election is no different."

Want to 'Fix this sh**'? Get involved
Mar. 2, 2020
Marin Independent Journal
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, is quoted about the dangerous apathy of "political hobbyism," or treating politics more like entertainment. Hersh is the author of "Politics is For Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change." 

A quarter of Americans aren't preparing for a coronavirus outbreak. Some of them told us why they're not worried yet.
Mar. 2, 2020
Business Insider
Rosemary Taylor, associate professor, Department of Sociology, says that "government transparency, a robust belief in scientific data, and a faith in international cooperation--to all of which President Trump has expressed antagonism in the past," is required to help Americans prepare for a coronavirus outbreak.

"On Belonging and Becoming"
Mar. 1, 2020
Landscape Architecture Magazine
The March 2020 issue of the magazine of the American Society of Landscape Architects includes a feature interview with Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning Julian Agyeman--"a pioneer in the overlapping terrain of social equity, environmental justice, design, and planning."

Why Trump Isn't Trying to Bring Down Bernie Sanders
Feb. 28, 2020
The Atlantic
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, is quoted regarding how Bernie Sanders supporters might vote if Sanders does not get the Democratic nomination, saying that "some of those people might find it easy to sit out a general election or cast a protest vote." Schaffner's analysis of the 2016 election is also mentioned.

Ecologically diverse clades dominate the oceans via extinction resistance
Feb. 28, 2020
Phys.org
Noel Heim, lecturer, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, participated in collaborative research that showed animal biodiversity in the modern oceans can be attributed to lower extinction rates in animal groups that are ecologically diverse.

UC Santa Cruz leads collaborative project to develop novel technology for improving wound healing
Feb. 27, 2020
The Medical News
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, initiated collaborative work, funded by a $16 million Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) contract, to develop bioelectronic bandage technology to improve the healing of serious wounds. 

Are the Houston Astros irredeemable cheaters? Or are they all of us?
Feb. 26, 2020
Fortune
Sam Sommers, professor of psychology, delves into research on the psychology of cheating to examine the latest Major League Baseball scandal involving the Houston Astros.

Smaller animals faced surprisingly long odds in ancient oceans
Feb. 21, 2020
Phys.org
Noel Heim, lecturer, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, participated in collaborative research on fossils from the deep past that found extinction among smaller sea creatures was unexpectedly common. Heim is quoted.

Democrats worry about party split ahead of convention
Feb. 20, 2020
GloucesterTimes.com
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, comments on whether Democrats, split between moderates and liberals, will unite around the party's eventual nominee. 

Voter suppression issues rank low among reasons nonvoters stay home
Feb. 19, 2020
Politico
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, was an advisor on a comprehensive new Knight Foundation survey of habitual nonvoters in the United States, examining issues they care about and reasons why they don't vote. Hersh notes that these results "shouldn't be lightly dismissed." 

AMS designates Secretary and Treasurer
Feb. 19, 2020
American Mathematical Society
Boris Hasselblatt, professor, Department of Mathematics, has been named Secretary of the American Mathematical Society beginning February 1, 2021.

#2: Mass Incarceration and the Literature of Confinement
Feb. 18, 2020
Medium
Hilary Binda, senior lecturer, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, discusses her course Mass Incarceration and the Literature of Confinement, which Tufts students take alongside incarcerated individuals at a medium-security prison. Binda is founder and director of the Tufts University Prison Initiative of Tisch College. 

Rising in polls, Bloomberg to make his first debate appearance Wednesday
Feb. 18, 2020
The Boston Globe
Professor of Political Science Jeffrey Berry says that the temptation "to pile on in terms of criticism for [Michael] Bloomberg without making a positive case for themselves" could be a detriment to other candidates during tonight's Democratic presidential debate.

Why Trump and His Supporters Love to Hate Nancy Pelosi | Opinion
Feb. 18, 2020
Newsweek
Recent research from Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, about the role of sexist attitudes on predicting voter choices is cited in this opinion piece.

Why liberals are bad at politics
Feb. 18, 2020
Vox
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, discusses his new book Politics is for Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change in this conversation.

Rep. Kennedy calls Markey a "good senator" but argues for ousting the incumbent
Feb. 18, 2020
The Washington Post
Professor of Political Science Jeffrey Berry weighs in on the Massachusetts primary race between incumbent Sen. Ed Markey and Rep. Joe Kennedy III, saying "it's really a choice based on personality and sense of who is going to represent Massachusetts going forward in a way that counters President Trump."

How Oregon's cap-and-trade bill would work
Feb. 14, 2020
Capital Press
Gilbert Metcalf, John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, describes how cap-and-trade emissions programs work. 

Fed Picks Shelton, Waller: Two Mavericks with Little in Common
Feb. 13, 2020
Bloomberg
Brian Bethune, lecturer, Department of Economics, comments on former Trump campaign advisor Judy Shelton's "unprecedented" approach to getting President Trump's nomination for a Federal Reserve Board seat.

How America's shrinking cities can 'rightsize'
Feb. 13, 2020
The Guardian
Justin Hollander, A96, professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, is quoted in this article about how some shrinking U.S. cities have worked to improve the quality of life for those who have stayed.

Americans Were Already Primed To Distrust Elections. Then Came Iowa.
Feb. 11, 2020
FiveThirtyEight
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, comments on political elites challenging election outcomes, claiming fraud or theft. 

Moment of truth
Feb. 8, 2020
EagleTribune
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, is quoted about the upcoming New Hampshire primary, saying "I think this race is wide open. I don't think there is a favorite at this point."

Dead monster galaxy found lurking in the distant universe
Feb. 5, 2020
CNN-US
Danilo Marchesini, associate professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Marianna Annunziatella, postdoctoral associate, are part of the team that discovered a supersized galaxy that once formed stars at a high rate and then--contrary to current models of galaxy formation--suddenly stopped. Marchesini is quoted. 
          Additional Coverage:
          USA Today
        The Independent 
        Yahoo! News UK

Political Hobbyism, High Impact Philanthropy, Lake Erie Rights
Feb. 5, 2020
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, appears in this "Top of Mind with Julie Rose" episode to discuss his new book Politics Is for Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change. (This segment begins at the :31 mark.)

World's fireflies threatened by habitat loss and light pollution, experts warn
Feb. 3, 2020
The Washington Post
Professor of Biology Sara Lewis is quoted extensively about new collaborative research finding that firefly colonies around the globe are facing extinction due to human-generated factors such as habitat destruction and light pollution. Lewis is first author of the study. Co-authors include biology Ph.D. student Avalon Owens and Michael Reed, professor of biology. 
          Additional Coverage:
         
 The New York Times
            CNN-US
            The Boston Globe
            The Guardian
          US News & World Report

Ukraine Explained
Feb. 3, 2020
World Affairs
Oxana Shevel, associate professor, Department of Political Science, is among the experts discussing Ukraine politics and Ukraine's relationship with the United States.

A Bionic Jellyfish Swims With Manic Speed (for a Jellyfish)
Jan. 29, 2020
Wired
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, comments on research in which jellyfish were equipped with microchips and electrodes to turbocharge their swimming pace.

The Least-Difficult Reform for College Admissions
Jan. 29, 2020
The Atlantic
Natasha Warikoo, professor, Department of Sociology, calls for an end to legacy admissions at elite higher education institutions. Warikoo is the author of The Diversity Bargain: And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities.

Trump's greatest trick was convincing voters that women can't win elections
Jan. 29, 2020
Mother Jones
Multiple research studies by Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, on the effects of "sexist" attitudes on voting are featured extensively in this article on the electability of women candidates.

Listen Up, Liberals: You Aren't Doing Politics Right
Jan. 27, 2020
The New York Times
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, writes about the dangerous apathy of "political hobbyism," or treating politics more like entertainment, and urges community engagement with organized politics in order to enact real political and social change.

A Prairie Flower That Flourishes With Fire
Jan. 27, 2020
The New York Times
Professor of Biology Elizabeth Crone comments on how a new, 20-year study finding that controlled burning positively affects the regrowth of purple coneflowers saying, "it is the first time I have seen that idea [a pollination and reproductive effect] in response to fires." Coneflowers growing on burned land produced more seeds and bloomed more often than those not affected by fire.

The Hidden Violence of "Sharp Objects" and Real Life Pig Farming
Jan. 24, 2020
Medium
Alex Blanchette, assistant professor, Department of Anthropology, is quoted in this article about the realities of animal husbandry and slaughter depicted in the novel and television series, "Sharp Objects."

Window tech could save billions of birds, and it's already here
Jan. 24, 2020
Mongabay
Michael Reed, professor of biology, is quoted in this article on newer, bird-safe window technology, saying that "sustainability [reflects] what gets paid attention to as a social issue. If people get behind [bird-safe solutions], that's what will be the focus."

The data is clear: A woman could win in 2020
Jan. 21, 2020
The Hill - Blogs
This article cites research from Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, on the effect of "sexist" attitudes on voting. A link to his July 2019 Washington Post piece detailing voters' choice to support a female candidate in the 2020 Democratic primaries is provided.

Would a Carbon Tax Hurt the Economy?
Jan. 21, 2020
Berkeley Energy Institute
This blog is about a paper co-authored by Gilbert Metcalf, John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, about the macroeconomic impact of carbon taxes.

'Swallowed by Opioids'?: A New Look at Appalachian 'Deaths of Despair'
Jan. 21, 2020
RealClearPolicy
A new working paper co-authored by Gilbert Metcalf, John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, examining the relationship between the injuries and health risks associated with coal mining and opioid-related addiction and deaths within Appalachia, is discussed.

Education makes people more likely to support political compromise...except for conservatives
Jan. 20, 2020
USAPP
James Glaser, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and professor of political science, Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, and Deborah Schildkraut, professor of political science, write about their new research finding that more education among liberals and moderates is linked to greater support for political compromise, while among conservatives, there is no difference of opinion regarding compromise between levels of education.

Politics Is For Power
Jan. 17, 2020
WNYC Studios
In this "On the Media" segment, Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, discusses his new book Politics Is for Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change."

7 Massachusetts projects awarded National Endowment for the Humanities grants
Jan. 17, 2020
The Boston Globe
The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded Ioannis Evrigenis, professor, Department of Political Science, $60,000 for work on a new edition of the 1576 book, "The Six Bookes of a Commonweale," written by French philosopher Jean Bodin.

What Rich Centrists Could Learn from Howard Schultz about Political Power
Jan. 16, 2020
Niskanen Center
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, discusses why Howard Schultz's approach to building Starbucks would supply a "surprisingly good roadmap for building political power."

NEA Awards $27.3M to Projects in All Fifty States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rice
Jan. 16, 2020
Artforum
Tufts has received funding from the National Endowment for the Arts for its upcoming exhibit, "Art for the Future: Artists Call and Central American Solidarity in the 1980s."

How much does sexism matter for female candidates? 
Jan. 15, 2020
Vox
This article cites research from Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, on the effect of "sexist" attitudes on voting. A link to his July 2019 Washington Post piece detailing voters' choice to support a female candidate in the 2020 Democratic primaries is provided.

Circadian Clock Genes Help a Crop Pest Adapt to Climate Change
Jan. 13, 2020
The Scientist Magazine 
This article highlights European corn borer moth research by Erik Dopman, associate professor of biology, through his Dopman lab. 

Scientists at UVM, Tufts create 'living robots'
Jan. 13, 2020
The Boston Globe
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology, is co-leader on a study completed at Tufts and at the University of Vermont that has led to the creation of the world's first living robots using stem cells from frogs.
          Additional Coverage:
         
CNN
          Wired
            Smithsonian 
            The Guardian
          Scientific American

78 | Daniel Dennett on Minds, Patterns, and the Scientific Image
Jan. 6, 2020
Player FM
Daniel Dennett, University Professor and Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric, Department of Philosophy, is featured in this episode of "Sean Carroll's Mindscape" podcast.

Long-Term Learning Gains Remain Elusive with Flipped Model
Jan. 6, 2020
Campus Technology
This article examines collaborative research by Elizabeth Setren, Gunnar Myrdal Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, that found the "flipped classroom" method of teaching fails to boost student performance and may also exacerbate achievement gaps between different groups of learners.

Trump's military strike might help Joe Biden by elevating foreign policy in the Democratic race
Jan. 3, 2020
The Boston Globe
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, is quoted regarding how the U.S. assassination of Iran's Qassem Suleimani might affect the Democratic primary race.

Fall 2019

Charlotte Talks: John Williams' Musical Legacy Goes Beyond A Galaxy Far, Far Away
Dec. 17, 2019
WFAE 90.7 FM
Frank Lehman, associate professor of music, discusses the musical legacy of composer John Williams. Williams' final "Star Wars" film score will be release on December 18.

Did That Really Happen? How Our Memories Betray Us
Dec. 16, 2019
National Public Radio
Tufts' Cognitive Aging and Memory Lab, led by Ayanna Thomas, professor of psychology, is cited as a resource in this "Hidden Brain" segment on memory.

Immigration is shaping the youngest generation of voters
Dec. 14, 2019
Axios
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, is quoted regarding how Generation Z's racial and ethnic diversity shapes political and social views.

David M. Shribman: America cares about politics again
Dec. 14, 2019
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, is quoted from his upcoming book Politics is for Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change.

How John Williams's Star Wars score subtly pulls us to the dark side
Dec. 13, 2019
The Washington Post
Assistant Professor of Music Frank Lehman analyzes composer John Williams' musical representation of Star Wars villains. 

NATO Should Replace OHR as Guarantor of Bosnia's Stability
Dec. 12, 2019
BalkanInsight.com
Bruce Hitchner, professor and chair, Department of Classical Studies, writes that the best way for Bosnia to achieve political stability, security and prosperity is by closing the Office of the High Representative and entering into NATO membership. 

Trump Has a Gift for Tearing Us Apart
Dec. 11, 2019
Research by Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, and Laurel Bliss, an A&S undergraduate, comparing the views of Democrats who post on social media regularly with those who do not is cited in this New York Times opinion piece. 

Algeria's election is a vote few actually want
Dec. 11, 2019
The Washington Post
Hugh Roberts, Edward Keller Professor of North Africa and the Middle East, Department of History, comments on Algeria's upcoming elections, noting that though the Hirak protest movement is against the elections, they have "proposed little by way of meaningful political reform."

Parents Don't Need to Be Coding Experts, Just Willing to Learn With Their Children 
Dec. 11, 2019
EdSurge
Marina Bers, professor and chair, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, co-authors this piece on how parents can help introduce and support coding in early childhood. 

At 'Black Out' Performances, the Power of Healing Through Community
Dec. 3, 2019
The New York Times
Maurice Parent, professor of the practice, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, is highlighted in this article for organizing a #blackoutBOSTON performance of Tarell Alvin McCraney's play Choir Boy, which he directed for SpeakEasy Stage.   

Virtual Reality is a Cool Rehab Tool, But Ensure it is 'Thoughtfully Applied' to Each Patient
Nov. 26, 2019
Rehab Management 
Nancy Baker, associate professor of occupational therapy, is quoted regarding the use of virtual reality in occupational therapy, noting that the approach "has to be thoughtfully applied."

Thank fungi for cheese, wine and beer this holiday season
Nov. 26, 2019
The Conversation
Research by Benjamin Wolfe, Aptman Family Assistant Professor of Biology, exploring how wild strains of fungi can quickly evolve into domesticated ones for use in food production, including Penicillium camemberti, the mold that creates Camembert cheese, is discussed in this article. 

Study pinpoints possible cause of noise-related blood vessel damage, heart disease
Nov. 26, 2019
Scienmag
Professor of Psychology Lisa Shin is among the authors of a new study finding that long-term exposure to environmental noise can activate stress-associated centers of the brain, which in turn trigger inflammation, blood vessel damage, and cardiovascular disease.

Six ways to handle Trump's impeachment during holiday dinners
Nov. 25, 2019
Brookings Institution Blogs
Research by Eitan Hersh, associate professor, Department of Political Science, on married couples with differing political identities is cited in this article. 

Season two on tap for Tanglewood Learning Institute
Nov. 21, 2019
The Berkshire Eagle
Assistant Professor of Music Frank Lehman will give a lecture on John Williams' concert arrangements and film scores as part of Tanglewood Learning Institute's summer programming.

8-3 hybrid system selected by Lowell City Council
Nov. 20, 2019
Lowell Sun Online
This article references a recent report by the Redistricting Lab of the Metric Geometry and Gerrymandering Group (MGGG), led by Moon Duchin, associate professor, Department of Mathematics, that compared ranked-choice voting with a hybrid system for the city of Lowell. 

Personal Goals Crucial in Virtual Reality Physical Training
Nov. 19, 2019
Medscape
Nancy Baker, associate professor of occupational therapy, is quoted regarding the use of virtual reality in occupational therapy, noting that the approach "has to be thoughtfully applied."

Davis Square's character is being challenged. Can it survive?
Nov. 18, 2019
The Boston Globe
Justin Hollander, A96, professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, was interviewed as part of this article about urban development and planning in Somerville.  

Hybrid system has council support as vote nears
Nov. 17, 2019
Lowell Sun Online
A recent report by the Redistricting Lab of the Metric Geometry and Gerrymandering Group (MGGG), led by mathematician Moon Duchin, associate professor, Department of Mathematics, found that "ranked-choice voting 

PW Picks: Books of the Week, November 18, 2019
Nov. 15, 2019
Publishers Weekly
Lecturer and Director of the American Studies program Kerri Greenidge's book Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter tops this books of the week list. 

How Narwhal the 'Unicorn' Puppy May Have Grown a Tail on His Head
Nov. 15, 2019
The New York Times
Vannevar Bush Professor of Biology Michael Levin comments on possible reasons that a puppy was born with a tail on his face, and discusses his work at the Allen Discovery Center is briefly described.

The Struggle for Pakistan--tumultuous but eventful 
Nov. 14, 2019
Daily Times
This is a review of Professor of History Ayesha Jalal's book The Struggle for Pakistan: A Muslim Homeland and Global Politics. 

A 'Hail Mary': Why Deval Patrick thinks he has a shot in the 2020 Democratic primary
Nov. 14, 2019
USA Today
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, comments on Deval Patrick's late entry into the Democratic presidential primary. 

Deval Patrick May Join Race For The White House After All
Nov 12, 2019
WBUR
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, comments on reports that former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick is considering jumping into the Democratic presidential nomination race, saying that "it's plausible that a late entry could win the nomination, unlikely, but plausible."

Why Is Anime So Universally Appealing?
Nov 10, 2019
Medium
Susan Napier, Goldthwaite Professor of Rhetoric, Department of International Literary and Cultural Studies, is quoted throughout this piece exploring the appeal of Japanese anime.

If The Camembert Is Made In Boston, Is It Still Camembert? 
Nov 8, 2019
WGBH News
Benjamin Wolfe, Aptman Family Assistant Professor of Biology, discusses his work with wild strains of fungi that can quickly evolve into domesticated ones for use in food production, including Penicillium camemberti, the mold that creates Camembert cheese. 

Research says 7 things make entrepreneurs different from everyone else like personality, family, and wealth
Nov 5, 2019
Business Insider
This article mentions research by Richard Lerner, Bergstrom Professor of Applied Developmental Science, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, on the mindset of kids who became entrepreneurs, as part of the collaborative Young Entrepreneurs Study. 

'Carb Cycling' lets your eat carbs--and it could help boost performance
Nov 1, 2019
CNBC
This article mentions 2008 research from Holly Taylor, professor of psychology, on how no-carb diets versus low-calorie diets affect memory in women. 

For Once, I Experienced Theater With A Lot Of Other Black People In Boston
Oct 30, 2019
WBUR
Maurice Parent, professor of the practice, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, organized a #BlackOutBoston performance of the recent production he directed for SpeakEasy Stage, "Choir Boy."

Is Inequality Inevitable? 
Oct 30, 2019
Scientific American
Bruce Boghosian, professor, Department of Mathematics, writes about the "affine wealth model," developed by Tufts researchers, which "describes wealth distribution data more accurately than any other existing model."

Is Crispr the Next Antibiotic? 
Oct 28, 2019
The New York Times
Mitch McVey, professor, Department of Biology, says that a new study examining how the gene-editing tool Crispr can be used to fight bacterial and viral infections "represents a significant advance in being able to target bacteria in a highly specific way."

Gap between ranked choice and hybrid system reported
Oct 28, 2019
Lowell Sun Online
Moon Duchin, associate professor, Department of Mathematics, discusses a new report by Redistricting Lab of the Metric Geometry and Gerrymandering Group (MGGG), analyzing two different election systems under consideration by the city of Lowell. 

Museum Directors Under 40: A Brief History of 20 Young Leaders Who Helped Shape Their Institutions
Oct 28, 2019
ARTnews
Andrew McClellan, professor, Department of the History of Art and Architecture, consulted on and is quoted in this list of the 20 most influential, young museum directors in the United States since the 1920s. 

Trump's request for 'favor' could really hurt Ukraine's president— and his agenda​
Oct 7, 2019
The Washington Post 
Oxana Shevel, associate professor, Department of Political Science, writes this piece examining how President Trump's request for a "favor" may impact Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky's agenda on reform against corruption. 

Voltage gated calcium channels 'read' electric patterns in embryos to create cartilage and bone
Oct 7, 2019
ScienceDaily
New research from the Allen Discovery Center, conducted in collaboration with Harvard Medical School, demonstrates how electrical patterns within embryos trigger the molecular changes required for cellular differentiation to develop cartilage and bone, and ultimately limb formation. Center director and Vannevar Bush Professor, Department of Biology, Michael Levin is quoted.

Here Are The Issues Markey and Kennedy Have Focused On In D.C.
Oct 7, 2019
WBUR
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, is quoted throughout this article reviewing the legislative efforts of Sen. Ed Markey and Rep. Joe Kennedy III, who will face each other in the Massachusetts U.S. Senate Democratic primary.

Diversity of jury seen as key factor in officer's conviction
Oct 4, 2019
Associated Press
In this article exploring the racial composition of the jury in the trial of Dallas police officer Amber Guyger, Samuel Sommers, professor of psychology, is quoted regarding his research that explored the role of racial diversity in the jury decision-making process. He says, "Race and ethnicity influence our perceptions and judgment all the time in our daily lives. Nothing makes those biases disappear when we enter a jury room."

Highlights: Experts debate the future of America's alliances
Oct 3, 2019
Brookings Institution Blogs
Michael Beckley, associate professor, Department of Political Science, participated in a Foreign Policy at Brookings and the Charles Koch Institute debate centered on U.S. alliances around the world. Video of the debate is included. 

Morning Joe
Oct 2, 2019
MSNBC
Jeffrey Taliaferro, associate professor, Department of Political Science, participates in this Morning Joe panel discussion on how the relationship between Rudy Giuliani and Attorney General William Barr is affecting President Trump's impeachment defense. 

Flight landed early? Not so fast.
Sep 27, 2019
The Fayetteville Observer
This article features research by Silke Forbes, associate professor of economics, who investigated the airlines that pad their schedules, which allows them to say flights have landed "early."

Computers Are Making Huge Mistakes Because They Can't Understand Chaos, Scientists Warn
Sep 27, 2019
Science Alert
Bruce Boghosian, professor, Department of Mathematics, is first author of a new collaborative study that discovered flaws in the long-standing approach to approximating real numbers on digital computers, or the floating-point arithmetic method, which could lead to inaccurate results in computational science and modelling. Boghosian is quoted.

What To Expect From Warren On The Debate Stage, Now That She's A Front-Runner
Sep 12, 2019
WBUR
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, comments on Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren's presidential campaign strategy. 

Sit, stand, sit: The new science about how to best use your standing desk
Sep 12, 2019
CNN.com International
This article mentions collaborative Tufts research examining the effectiveness of sit-stand desks in the workplace. Nancy Baker, associate professor of occupational therapy, was senior author. 

After a summer surge, Elizabeth Warren could be a target in Thursday's debate
Sep 11, 2019
The Boston Globe
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, comments on how Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren should focus her Democratic presidential debate efforts to win the nomination. 

Another fire is raging in Brazil — in Rio’s favelas
Sep 6, 2019
The Washington Post
In this opinion piece, Anjuli Fahlberg, lecturer, Department of Sociology, discusses the devastating government sanctioned violence in Rio de Janeiro's favela neighborhoods as a result of Rio Governor Wilson Witzel's harsh public security policies targeting these poor communities. 

Weaker job report in August 'cements' a Fed interest-rate cut in two weeks
Sep 6, 2019
MarketWatch
Brian Bethune, lecturer, Department of Economics, is among the experts quoted in this article about expected interest rate cuts by the Federal Reserve. 

Why Pope Francis struggles in Africa
Sep 5, 2019
The Economist
Elizabeth Foster, associate professor, Department of History, comments on how today's African Catholic church is in some ways a by-product of French colonial policies. Foster is author of the new book African Catholic: Decolonization and the Transformation of the Church.

Hong Kong protesters win in court of public opinion — but need our legal defense
Sep 5, 2019
The Hill
Katrina Lantos Swett, lecturer, Department of Political Science, writes this opinion piece on how Hong Kong's full withdrawal of a Chinese extradition bill is a victory for the people of Hong Kong, who still need further support for their democracy movement.

Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter
Sep 4, 2019
Publishers Weekly
A review of Lecturer and Director of the American Studies program Kerri Greenidge's new book Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter.