People

Emeritus Faculty

Daniel Abbott, Associate Professor of Music, emeritus
Biography coming soon.

T.J. Anderson

T.J. Anderson, Professor of Music, emeritus is one of the leading composers of his generation. He was born August 17, 1928 in Coatesville, Pennsylvania and received degrees from West Virginia State College, Penn State University, and a Ph.D. in Composition from the University of Iowa. He also holds several honorary degrees. After serving as Chairman of the Department of Music at Tufts University for eight years, Thomas Jefferson Anderson became Austin Fletcher Professor of Music and in 1990 became Austin Fletcher Professor of Music Emeritus. He now lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina where he devotes full time to writing music.
 

Jane Bernstein

Jane A. Bernstein, Austin Fletcher Professor of Music Emerita.
B.A., City College of New York, 1967. M.Mus., University of Massachusetts, 1968. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1974. Musicologist.

Primary research interests center on Renaissance music, women's studies, and nineteenth-century Italian opera. In 1999, she won the Otto Kinkeldey Award from the American Musicological Society for Music Printing in Renaissance Venice: The Scotto Press (1539–1572) and, in 2005, her book Women's Voices across Musical Worlds was named a finalist for the Pauline Alderman Award from International Alliance for Women in Music. Her other major publications include Print Culture and Music in Sixteenth-Century Venice (2002), the thirty-volume series The Sixteenth-Century Chanson, Philip Van Wilder: Collected Works, and French Chansons of the Sixteenth Century. She is currently working on a book about music print culture in Renaissance Rome.

Bernstein has received fellowships and grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, and the Gladys Delmas Foundation for Venetian Studies. In 2005, she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served as President of the American Musicological Society in 2008-10 and was conferred Honorary Member of the Society in 2014.

Mark DeVoto

Mark DeVoto, Professor of Music, emeritus.
B.A., Harvard College, 1961. M.F.A., 1963, and Ph.D., 1967, Princeton University. Composer, writer, and musicologist. Compiler, Mostly Short Pieces: An Anthology for Harmonic Analysis. Co-author (with Walter Piston), Harmony, 5th edition. Research on Alban Berg, Debussy, Schubert, Stravinsky, history of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century music. Appointed 1981. Visit his webpage for more information on Professor DeVoto and a short version of his CV.
 

Janet Schmalfeldt

Janet Schmalfeldt, Professor of Music, emeritus.
B.A. and B.Mus., Lawrence University; M.M.A., Piano Performance, Yale School of Music; Ph.D., Music Theory, Yale University, 1979.

Janet Schmalfeldt joined the Department of Music at Tufts University in 1995, where she is now Professor Emerita; she previously taught at McGill University and at Yale. In recent years, she has offered graduate courses as a visiting professor in the music departments at the University of Chicago (2014), Harvard (2015), Boston University (2016), and the University of Pavia, in Cremona (October 2017). She is the author of a book on Alban Berg's opera Wozzeck and has published widely on eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century music. Her book In the Process of Becoming: Analytic and Philosophical Perspectives on Form in Early Nineteenth-Century Music (2011) received a 2012 ASCAP – Deems Taylor Award and the 2012 Wallace Berry Award from the Society for Music Theory. She has served as President of the New England Conference of Music Theorists and of the Society for Music Theory. As an invited speaker, she has held seminars and workshops on musical form, performance, and analysis in Brazil, Italy, and the Netherlands and has given papers in Estonia, Germany, Poland, Ireland, Belgium, and England. Her performances as pianist have included solo, concerto, and chamber music.