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Spring 2019

Spring Course Schedule >

Required Core
UEP 0251-01 & -02 ECONOMICS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY ANALYSIS (01 – General, 02 – Environmental)
Required core course for M.A. and M.P.P. students. Economic concepts and tools of analysis for graduate students interested in public policy and planning. The emphasis of this course will be on microeconomic policy tools, although some macroeconomic topics will also be covered. The course will discuss the economic theories and techniques that can inform current policy debates such as global climate change, health care, employment, and economic inequality. The class will also demonstrate the limitations of economic analysis in guiding policy making. Although prior coursework in economics is not required, students are required to have a solid understanding of college-level algebra. Waiver permitted for students with an undergraduate major or substantial work-related experience in economics subject to faculty approval.
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9:00-10:15AM
Location: Anderson SEC 112
Instructor: Brian Roach/Mary Davis
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-LA ECONOMICS FOR PLANNING AND POLICY ANALYSIS – LAB (OPTIONAL)
Time: Mondays, 4:30-5:45PM
Location: Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructor: Roach/Davis

UEP 0255-01 FIELD PROJECTS: PLANNING AND PRACTICE
Required core course for students in M.A. program. Practical planning and research experience in a community or governmental setting. Students are exposed to the realities of urban and environmental planning practice by working in teams for actual clients. Focuses on the interplay of expertise, social and political values, and professional relationships.
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00AM-12:00PM
Location: Paige Hall, Terrace room
Instructors: Christine Cousineau, Penn Loh, Lambert
Syllabus:

UEP 0255-LA FIELD PROJECTS: PLANNING AND PRACTICE – LAB (OPTIONAL)
Time: Mondays, 9:00-11:00AM
Location: Paige Hall, Terrace room
Instructors: Christine Cousineau, Penn Loh, Lambert

UEP 0289-01 INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR
Required core course for students in M.P.P. program. Challenges students to examine their academic learning, to demonstrate mastery of specific skills, and to examine the implications of policy development and implementation in complex and politically charged settings. MPP students only.
Time: Wednesdays, 4:30-5:45PM
Location: 97 Talbot Avenue
Instructor: Penn Loh
Syllabus:

Electives in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
UEP 0094-01/ENV 0094-01 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, PLANNING AND POLITICS
(Co-listed with Environmental Studies) Open only to undergraduates, course introduces students to the concepts and techniques central to environmental policy, including the important roles played by politics and planning. Serves as a foundation for further work in Environmental Studies or as a broad overview of the issues key in the field. Structured around four varied case studies involving simulated environmental conflicts, each culminating in a "policy forum" consisting of presentations by student teams who represent specific interests (e.g., environmental advocates, legislators, agencies and corporations). Course also features guest presentations by other faculty from the graduate Department of Urban and Environmental policy and Planning.
Time: Thursdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Lane 100
Instructor: Stephen Long
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0181-01/CD 0143-05 HOMELESSNESS IN AMERICA
This course examines the inter-connected social, economic, and political causes and effects of homelessness among individuals, families, communities, and social systems. It examines a range of government, nonprofit, and other efforts to address those problems. Students engage in a team project and have opportunities to volunteer at an organization that serves people experiencing homelessness.
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1:30-2:45PM
Location: Granoff 271
Instructor: Laurie Goldman
Syllabus:

UEP 0188-01/CD 0188-01 SEMINAR ON GOVERNMENT AND THE FAMILY
(Co-listed with Department of Child Development) Government's role in promoting family development and well-being. Analysis of how various policies such as welfare, housing, community development, child support, and education impact children and families. CD 182 or consent required.
Time: Thursdays, 9:00AM-11:30AM
Location: Eliot-Pearson 163
Instructor: Virginia Weisz
Syllabus:

UEP 0201-01/CE 0201-01 LAND USE PLANNING II
(Co-listed with Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) Overview of land use planning methods, growth dynamics, and land development controls. Comparison of different approaches to land use planning and decision making. Impact of recent environmental legislation on land use. Techniques of mapping, site analysis, subdivision regulation, development controls, and fiscal incentives.
Time: Mondays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 574 Boston Ave, Room 202
Instructors: Jon Witten
Syllabus:

UEP 0194-01 URBAN DESIGN AND THE CHANGING SUBURBS
This course is intended to complement the urban orientation of other design courses at UEP by addressing the planning challenges posed by suburbs, in both their physical and social dimensions and the new emphasis on sustainable communities: a car-dependent, use-segregated environment and changing demographics.
Time: Tuesdays, 4:30-7:30PM
Location: Eaton 204
Instructor: Beth Lundell Garver
Syllabus:

UEP/CE/ENV 0207-01 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Analysis of environmental law and natural resource management at the federal, Tribal, state and local levels of government. The course is designed for those planning careers in environmental science, land use planning and environmental management and should be of value to others interested in learning about the structure of the nation's primary pollution statutes and mechanisms for managing and protecting natural resources.
Time: Thursdays, 3:30-6:00PM
Location: Eaton 207
Instructor: Earl Phillips
Syllabus:

UEP 0225-01 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
This course engages students in a wide ranging exploration of the theories, practices, and opportunities for enhancing social justice and sustainability in the domains of public policy and urban planning. The course will be a forum for students to draw on their work experiences and educational experiences to more fully understand, articulate, and advocate for social justice and sustainability in policy and planning. Please note: There is a live, synchronous component to this course. Online course. Permission required for non-CAGS students. For permission, please contact Christine Cousineau.
Time: Mondays, 7:00-8:30PM
Location: Online
Instructors: Christine Cousineau
Syllabus:

UEP 0261-01 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, PLANNING AND POLITICS
In a world where capitalism and an epistemology of technical rationality permeate every aspect of civic life, the knowledge systems of social groups such as indigenous peoples of the Americas and African slaves have been systematically oppressed, excluded and marginalized. This collaborative research seminar critically explores the idea of community development in a variety of settings as the "practice of freedom," a practice with profound implications for institutions of higher education and the resiliency of the regions in which they are located. The seminar positions higher education as the primary system of knowledge production and preservation, and a system with the ability to encourage and support new ways of knowing. Together, seminar participants will work to answer the question: what new, relevant knowledge can be shared and developed on the topic of community development through a diverse, dynamic and complex network of human relationships among people in the Global South and with people in the Global North? Their collaborative research will involve faculty, staff, students and community partners affiliated with Tufts University (Tufts), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh). Students will benefit from access to the resources of the Talloires Network (TN) at Tufts; MIT Community Innovators Lab (CoLab); and the Entrepreneurial Learning Center (CEM).
Time:
Fridays, 1:00PM-3:30PM
Location:
72 Professors Row
Instructor:
Lorlene Hoyt
Syllabus:


UEP 0294-11 WATER SYSTEMS, SCIENCE, AND SOCIETY (WSSS) RESEARCH PRACTICUM
Students from a broad range of disciplines across the University – including Engineering, UEP, Friedman, Fletcher, the vet school, and the med school – work as a team, in the consultant/client mode, with a non-governmental organization to investigate the physical and social impacts of a complex water-related issue. The course includes classroom meetings spread across both semesters in which students refine the project and prepare for field work conducted over spring break. In the past two years, this has taken the team to the Bahamas, where the focus was water pollution and sewerage infrastructure, including public perceptions of the problem, along with its health and ecosystem impacts. The course is open only to students enrolled in the Tufts WSSS program, and is taught in cooperation with the UEP Field Projects: Planning & Practice (UEP-255) course.
Time: Fridays, 2:00-5:00PM
Location: 26 Winthrop St, Room 101
Instructors: Ann Rappaport
Syllabus:
Electives in Nonprofit Management and Professional Skills
GIS 0101-01 INTRODUCTION TO GIS
(Cross-listed as ENV 107.) Broad foundation of Geographic Information Systems theory, capabilities, technology, and applications. Topics include GIS data discovery, data structure and management; principles of cartographic visualization; and basic spatial analysis and modeling. Assignments concentrate on applying concepts covered in lectures and class exercises to term projects in each student's fields of interest.
Restrictions: Undergraduate Students Only
Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, 1:30-2:45PM
Location: Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructor: Alexandra Thorn

GIS 0102-01 ADVANCED GIS
(Cross-listed as ENV 197). Design and use of spatial information systems to support analytical modeling in research and practice. Topics include the structure and integration of large data sets, relational database management, development of spatial data, integration of data into models and geoprocessing techniques, and basic scripting to support geospatial modeling. Recommendations: GIS (CIS) 101 or equivalent.
Restrictions: Undergraduate Students Only
Time: Friday, 9:00AM-12:00PM
Location: Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructor: Sumeeta Srinivasan
Syllabus:

UEP 0206-01 PLANNING FOR LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID)
The course is designed to present a comprehensive approach to site planning and development that incorporates low-impact development approaches and techniques. Also known as green infrastructure, low-impact development is a conservation-based site planning and design process that sets aside critical open space buffers, reduces impervious surfaces and concentrates development into appropriate "building envelopes". It also includes a broad range of best management practices including green roofs, bioretention, rain gardens, vegetated swales, constructed wetlands, infiltration systems and alternative wastewater management systems.
Time: Fridays, 9:00-11:30AM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave
Instructors: Scott Horsley
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0230-01 NEGOTIATION, MEDIATION AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Techniques of negotiation and mediation applied to a broad range of conflict situations from interpersonal differences to labor relations, environmental disputes, and international relations. Combines practice in basic methods with theoretical and applied aspects of conflict resolution.
Restrictions: Graduate Students Only
Time: Thursdays, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: Olin 002
Instructors: Robert Burdick
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0232-01 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Broad foundation of GIS theory capabilities, technology, and applications. Topics include GIS data structure and management, geodesy and map projections, and various techniques for raster and vector spatial data analysis. Laboratory exercises concentrate on applying concepts presented in the lectures using Idrisi and ArcGIS.
Restrictions: UEP Students Only
Time: Tuesdays, Thursdays, 12:00-1:15PM
Location: Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructors: Sumeeta Srinivasan
Syllabus:

UEP 0253-01 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS AND MANAGEMENT
Tools and terminology needed by staff of public and nonprofit organizations to effectively manage financial resources. Emphasis on how to create tools and systems needed to analyze fiscal data and how to use the data to answer fundamental questions facing financial managers. Topics include budgeting, construction of cash flow projections, reading and analyzing financial statements, internal and external reporting requirements, internal controls, and borrowing and investment decisions. Graduate standing or consent.
Time:
Tuesdays, 6:30-9:00PM
Location:
Olin 102
Instructors:
David Orlinoff
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0256-01/CD 0247-01/DLS 265 PROGRAM EVALUATION
(Co-listed with Department of Child Development.) Purposes for, and types and techniques of, program evaluation. Study of the evaluation process, including design, implementation, and dissemination, with focus on development of relevant data collection, analysis, and report writing skills. Emphasis on learning to match individual programs with particular models of evaluation.
Restrictions: Graduate Students Only
Time: Mondays, 6:30-9:00PM
Location: Eliot-Pearson 163
Instructor: Mariah Contreras
Syllabus:

UEP 0275-01 POLICY IMPLEMENTATION AND INNOVATION

(Cross-listed w/DLS 242) Seminar explores how policies, programs, and initiatives get translated into practice in public and nonprofit organizations through case studies and individual student projects. Reviews the challenges of implementation in light of concerns about accountability to multiple stakeholders and responsibility for achieving results. Explores strategies for innovative solutions to overcome implementation challenges including performance measurement, diffusion and adaptation of innovations, inter-organizational coordination and collaboration, and strategic framing.
Time: Wednesday, 6:00-9:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructors: Laurie Goldman
Syllabus:

UEP 0284-01 DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES
This course explores the many challenges of achieving 'just sustainabilities' through a critical, coherent and thought provoking overview of moves towards developing sustainable communities. The course focuses on: improving our quality of life and wellbeing; meeting the needs of both present and future generations (intra-generational and intergenerational equity); justice and equity in terms of recognition, process, procedure, and outcome; living within ecosystem limits (also called ‘one planet living’). It investigates the theories of sustainable development and the tools and techniques and in what contexts we can move towards the ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, responsibility and social well-being characteristic of sustainable communities. Case studies are drawn from around the world.
Time:
Thursdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location:
97 Talbot Ave.
Instructors:
Julian Agyeman
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-22 ADVANCED GIS
This course is intended to be students from any discipline with an interest in data analysis. It explores advanced topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their applications in a specific context of interest to the students either in group or individual projects. Every week, there will be a lecture and discussion as well as laboratory exercise when students will be expected to work with a variety of spatial analysis methods including spatial statistics, geostatistics and network analysis. The lab exercise will segue into weekly assignment. The lab component will focus on the use of ArcGIS (Version 10.3) and Geoda among other software in a Windows environment. Automation using Python and Model builder will be explored. The instructor will also provide support to students who would like to use R. Prerequisites: A full semester introductory GIS course or its equivalent.
Time:
Fridays, 9:00AM-12:00PM
Location:
Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructor:
Sumeeta Srinivasan
Syllabus:


UEP 0294-02 COMMUNICATION & MEDIA (1 CREDIT MODULE)
This 1-SHU module introduces communications and media theory and tools for policy and planning practitioners. Readings will cover various theories of communication and media and their roles in public policy and planning and formation of ideologies. Tools that will be introduced include strategic communications planning, narrative power analysis, messaging and framing, media relations, and social media. Students will analyze current news and communications strategies of policy and planning practitioners. Students will have ample opportunities in class to practice and role play communications and media strategies (such as mock media interviews and writing op-eds).
Time: 1/18 9:00AM - 1PM, 2/8 9:30AM - 4:30PM, 3/1 9:00AM - 1PM
Location: 72 Professors Row
Instructors: Penn Loh
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-07 TEACHING DEMOCRACY
Teaching Democracy (TD) provides an introduction to the rationale for and uses and methods of participatory and popular education. It combines participatory classroom learning, reading, journaling, and practical experience. During the two all-day sessions, participants will draw on their own experiences to identify effective practices in teaching and learning, and to compare traditional and popular education. They will explore some of the ways that popular education has been / can be applied in different settings. They will practice designing and facilitating a popular education session. After the two-day training, participants will choose from a reading list to build their theoretical and applied knowledge. They will also select a placement based on their own interests for 10-15 hours of practice / observation of participatory education in action. In addition, they will submit three journal reflections to draw out Insights and challenges related to the three course components (classes, readings, practicum). A final group session will pull everything together. This course is open to, and enriched by, community members from diverse backgrounds. For more information, see the Teaching Democracy web platform. As space is limited, students will be selected based on a registration process and the extent to which they will be likely to use these methods in the near term.

This modules requires an application. To apply, please fill out this online application by December 21, 2018.

The first two classes meet on the Boston Campus. Room TBA, The last class meets on the Medford campus, room TBA.

Time & Location: 3/2, 3/9 Sackler 507 (Boston Campus), 5/8, 97 Talbot Ave.
Instructors: May Louie
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-08 DATA SCIENCE FOR URBAN SUSTAINABILITY
This course is the second half of a one-year series of spatial data science for solving urban challenges. Building upon the toolkits and technical skills that students learned in "Urban Analytics and Visualization" or other introductory level data science courses, this course is composed of two modules. The first module will introduce students advanced topics, methods, and tools in spatial data science and visualization. The second module will provide several open-ended projects for students to work in pairs/teams. These real-world projects are developed with research collaborators including local planning agencies, cities, or international organizations whose decision-making impacts development of communities and cities. Students will be given open-ended questions, and apply methods learned in the course to collect, manage, and analyze new and traditional data to develop plans to measure the impact of urban development on the natural and built environment and the society. Each team will present their project findings and solutions to the research collaborators at the end of the class. This course can also be useful for students to work in conjunction with their thesis or capstone projects.
Prerequisites: (a) Urban Analytics and Visualization, or introductory level data science courses. (b) For students who do not meet the prerequisites listed in (a), they are required to take Data Lab workshops on GIS and Python programming.
Time: Tuesdays, 1:30PM-4:00PM
Location: Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructors: Shan Jiang
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-09 LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE
A survey course on the financial operations of local government. Focus on the concepts, techniques and law relating to municipal finance. Detailed analysis of the tools available to local governments as they seek to raise revenues for the provision of traditional services, including the property tax and fees (user and regulatory), but with emphasis on "new" strategies such as impact fees and development agreements. Discussion of trends toward "privatization" and the legal implications of transferring traditional municipal obligations to the private sector. Discussion of the policy implications found in "tax cap" states such as California and Massachusetts.
Time: Wednesdays, 4-6:30PM
Location: 72 Professors Row
Instructors: Jon Witten
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-13/OTS 230 RUNNING EFFECTIVE GROUPS (3 CREDITS)
This interdisciplinary course explores the structure, dynamics, communication, and action patterns of small groups. Classes and readings will focus on theories of small group functioning and elements of group process that lead to effective group formation, development, and closure. Group experiences in class will assist in integrating theoretical learning, building upon skills in group observation, leadership, and individual membership. Understanding personal dynamics with organizational culture in relation to group development in small and large group systems will also be addressed. The class will be part of its own laboratory in small group dynamics. One course credit. Maximum enrollment 12. Cross listed with ED 252 Group Dynamics.
Time: Mondays, 4:30PM-7:30PM
Location: 574 Boston Ave., Room 216E
Instructors: Sharan Schwartzberg
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-14 SHARING CITIES, SMART CITIES
How can cities, where the majority of the world’s people now live, become more socially just, more environmentally sustainable, smarter and more socially innovative? This class will look into the reinvention and revival of one of our most basic human traits: sharing. It will look at the growth of the sharing economy as a largely transactional activity while presenting a more relational (social, cultural, and political) alternative through communal models of sharing that build solidarity and spread trust. Focusing on the role of cities in urban policy and planning, it will demonstrate how, with smart technologies and social innovation, the intersection of urban space and cyberspace can provide an unrivaled platform for more just, inclusive, and environmentally efficient economies and societies rooted in a rediscovery of the urban commons and a sharing culture. Case studies will be drawn from around the world.
Time: Wednesdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: 97 Talbot Ave
Instructors: Julian Agyeman
Syllabus: Download PDF

UEP 0294-15 SPATIAL STATISTICS
This is a first course on spatial data analysis. Students will learn about global and local spatial autocorrelation statistics, cluster analysis, principal component analysis, point patterns, interpolation, hotspot analysis and space time analysis. They will also learn to use a variety of regression techniques for spatial data including spatial, autologistic and geographically weighted regressions. Several open source software will be introduced: Geoda, CrimeStat, SAM, CAST and R. The course will have weekly lab exercises and a final project based on the student interests. Prerequisite: Introduction to Statistics or equivalent.
Time: Mondays, 6:00PM-9:00PM
Location: Data Lab, Tisch Library
Instructors: Sumeeta Srinivasan
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-19 EQUITY AND INCLUSION (2 CREDITS)
Research shows that more diverse and inclusive workplaces consistently out-perform their counterparts that do not have such a focus. In this two-credit seminar, students will learn why making space for diversity, equity and inclusion in the culture of their organizations is a just imperative with many organizational benefits. Materials and case studies will help to create a framework which leads with equity which will enable students to create their own strategies for making a way for this important focus in their organizations.
Time: Saturdays, 3/30, 4/13, 4/27, 5/4, 9:00AM–4:00PM
Location: Olin 001
Instructors: Sonja Spears
Syllabus:

UEP 0294-24 HOUSING AND INEQUALITY
This course explores the multidimensional relationship between housing and inequality in the United States. It begins by providing a conceptual framework for understanding inequality and evidence on recent trends. Next, we will examine the various ways that inequality is manifest through housing, including issues related to affordability, neighborhood conditions, and segregation. Finally, we will study government interventions to address housing inequality for low-income groups and critically analyze their successes and failures.
Time: Tuesdays, 1:30-4:00PM
Location: Miner 112
Instructors: Shomon Shamsuddin 
Syllabus: Download PDF

Directed Studies
UEP 0292-01 DIRECTED STUDIES
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

Thesis/Capstone
UEP 0295-01 THESIS
Prerequisites: Register for only if spring is first thesis semester
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

UEP 0296-01 THESIS
Prerequisites: For 2nd semester thesis students
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

UEP 0297 CAPSTONE EXAM
Instructors: UEP Faculty - Choose faculty name on SIS

Urban Studies Minor
UEP 0195-01 URBAN STUDIES CAPSTONE
Urban studies capstone project on an urban studies topic such as a research paper, an oral presentation, a video, a photographic exhibit, a fictional narrative, or other forms of study. Between one and three course credits (SHUs) will be given at the discretion of a project committee consisting of two faculty members.
Restrictions: Undergraduates students
Instructors: UEP Faculty

Internship
UEP 0299 INTERNSHIP
The UEP internship enhances professional skills, allows the student to explore career options, broadens professional contacts, and provides a meaningful opportunity to work in a community. The student arranges the internship with an employing agency for a minimum of 150 hours of work. Additional requirements: completion of an internship agreement with the employing agency prior to beginning work; the supervisor's evaluation; the student's assessment of the experience.