Faculty in the News

Fall 2022

What The Queen's Death Means For The Future Of The Commonwealth
September 20, 2022
NPR
Mary Richardson Professor of History at Tufts University Ayesha Jalal contributed to an episode of NPR's "1A" program to discuss what Queen Elizabeth's passing means for the future of the British Commonwealth, a political organization comprised of 56 countries across the globe.

Will the Next Pandemic Start With Chickens?
September 19, 2022
The New Republic
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of Environmental Studies Alex Blanchette is quoted in a piece in The New Republic, exploring the origin of new viruses, pandemics, and bird flu.

Are Asian Americans victims of racism or beneficiaries of whiteness? It's complex.
September 15, 2022
Boston Globe
In a new op-ed, Professor of Sociology Natasha Warikoo questions whether Asian Americans are the beneficiaries of privileges historically afforded to white people or are victims of racial discrimination. She concludes that the reality is complex and it’s time to discard this simplistic dichotomy.

15 Works of Nonfiction to Read This Fall
September 8, 2022
New York Times
Assistant Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge’s new book, “The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family,” is on a New York Times list of recommended nonfiction books.

Is MA as women-friendly as you think when it comes to election day?
September 8, 2022
Cape Cod Times
Lecturer in Political Science Kaitlin Kelly-Thompson comments on the real and symbolic impact of the election of women to positions of governance in this reprinted Wicked Local article.

A Rebel with a Cause: How I Breathed New Life into Monteverdi’s Saracen Warrior
September 7, 2022
The Guardian
Professor of the Practice in Music Kareem Roustom's work on a dance/opera entitled Clorinda Agonistes (Clorinda the Warrior) in London, England was highlighted in an op-ed in The Guardian. A review of the London premiere at the Sadler's Wells Theater was also reviewed in The Guardian.

Summer 2022

A weak China may be more warlike than a strong one
Aug 31, 2022
The Economist
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley’s new book “Danger Zone: The Coming Conflict With China,” co-authored by Hal Brands, is discussed in this article, which requires a subscription to read in full. 

Who is Artemis? NASA's latest mission to the Moon is named after an ancient lunar goddess turned feminist icon
Aug 30, 2022
The Conversation
Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Associate Professor, Department of Classical Studies, delves into NASA’s history of naming missions after mythological figures, including the upcoming Artemis I program that will travel around the Moon.

Local sociology professor discusses 'Race at the Top' book
Aug 30, 2022
WBUR
Natasha Warikoo, Lenore Stern Professor in Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, joins “Radio Boston” to discuss her book “Race at the Top: Asian Americans and Whites in Pursuit of the American Dream inSuburban Schools.”

What on earth is a xenobot? 
Aug 30, 2022
Aeon Magazine
Michael Levin, Distinguished Professor, Department of Biology, is quoted throughout this article highlighting theongoing collaborative xenobot research.

Hal Brands and Michael Beckley on China
Aug 30, 2022
American Enterprise Institute
Michael Beckley, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, joins this “School of War” episode to discuss global implications of China’s rise to power and its coming decline. Beckley and Hal Brands are the co-authors of the new book, “Danger Zone: TheComing Conflict With China.”

Beware the 'ghostliners': people who downplay Britain's slavery shame and mute calls for justice
Aug 27, 2022
The Guardian
Kris Manjapra, Professor Department of History, uses backlash over a monument at Cambridge’s Jesus College as an example of “ghostlining,” “a technique long used by the ruling classes that frames public debates in ways that sideline the experience of the oppressed and silence calls for social justice.”

'Danger Zone' author warns of growing tension between China and the U.S.
Aug 24, 2022
NPR
Michael Beckley, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, joins “Fresh Air” to discuss his new book, co-authored with Hal Brands, “Danger Zone: The Coming Conflict With China." 

Can computer simulations help fix democracy?
Aug 22, 2022
The Washington Post
Moon Duchin, Professor, Department of Mathematics, is quoted throughout this in-depth piece on the use of algorithmic redistricting technologies to combat gerrymandering and develop balanced legislative maps. 

The buzzy new app Sidechat is bringing community - and toxicity - to Harvard and Tufts
Aug 19, 2022
Boston.com
This article examines the use of the app Sidechat at Tufts, which enables students to post anonymously to fellow Tufts users. Keith Maddox, Professor, Department of Psychology, is quoted, and examples of posts from Tufts students are included.

Jazz Album Review: Barre Phillips and György Kurtág Jr. Go "Face à Face"
Aug 18, 2022
artsfuse.org
Michael Ullman, Senior Lecturer, Department of Music, reviews the new jazz album “Face à Face” from Barre Phillips and György Kurtág Jr.

Far-right Italian leader Meloni rides popular wave in polls
Aug 16, 2022
Associated Press News
David Art, Professor, Department of Political Science, comments in this article on the rise of Italy’s Giorgia Meloni, a far-right candidate for prime minister. 

How Stoicism influenced music from the French Renaissance to Pink Floyd
Aug 16, 2022
The Conversation
Melinda Latour, Rumsey Family Assistant Professor, Department of Music, uses two examples to illustrate how the Stoic school of philosophy has influenced music that contributes to emotional and mental well-being.

The most epic fantasy movie on HBO Max reveals a real threat to humanity
Jul 21, 2022
Inverse
Susan Napier, Goldthwaite Professor of Rhetoric, Department of International Literary and Cultural Studies, is quoted throughout this article analyzing director Hayao Miyazaki's animated film “Princess Mononoke,” which was released 25 years ago by Japan’s Studio Ghibli. Napier is the author of “Miyazakiworld: A Life in Art.”

A student from China told the University of Utah her boyfriend was threatening her. She was found dead weeks later.
Jul 21, 2022
NBC News
Natasha Warikoo, Lenore Stern Professor in Social Science, Department of Sociology, comments on the issue of misidentification, noting how people “are more likely to recognize people of our own race, and categorize people of other races.”

In progressive Massachusetts, a long history of white supremacy
Jul 18, 2022
Boston.com
Mellon Assistant Professor in the Department of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Kerri Greenidge is quoted throughout this Boston Globe reprint exploring the history of racism in Massachusetts.

Center plans to give W.E.B. Du Bois and other Black Berkshirites the credit they're due
Jul 14, 2022
Boston Globe
Kendra Field, Associate Professor, Department of History and Mellon Assistant Professor in the Department of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Kerri Greenidge comment in this article about the new W.E.B. Du Bois Center for Freedom and Democracy in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. The article also mentions that Field and Greenidge are both historic advisers for the center and notes their respective roles as director of Tufts’ Center for the Study of Race and Democracy and codirector of Tufts’ African American Trail Project.

Princess Mononoke: The masterpiece that flummoxed the US
Jul 13, 2022
BBC
Susan Napier, Goldthwaite Professor of Rhetoric, Department of International Literary and Cultural Studies, is quoted extensively in this article reflecting on director Hayao Miyazaki's animated film “Princess Mononoke,” which was released 25 years ago by Japan’s Studio Ghibli. Napier is the author of “Miyazakiworld: A Life in Art.”

Why outrage politics has such a grip on American life
Jul 10, 2022
The Hill
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, is quoted throughout this article examining how the media and the political system incentivize the dark side of outrage politics. 

Fears of Another Gas Shock Drive Biden to Seek Price Cap on Russian Oil
Jul 9, 2022
The New York Times
Steve Cicala, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, is quoted about why he believes President Biden’s proposed price cap on Russian oil “is unlikely to affect global oil prices.” 

Opinion: Restrictive zoning is the main factor squeezing the supply of housing
Jul 7, 2022
MarketWatch
Jeffrey Zabel, Professor, Department of Economics, writes this opinion piece examining the factors driving the rise in house prices.

How to retain women and LGBT+ scientists in physics
Jun 29, 2022
Utah Public Radio
Timothy Atherton, Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, discusses his new collaborative research that found LGBT+ physicists often face negative and exclusionary behavior in the workplace that make them leave the profession. 

How partisanship is making polling Americans more complicated
Jun 25, 2022
CNN
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, is quoted in this article about how partisan beliefs are skewing political polling efforts. A 2017 survey, co-conducted by Schaffner, examining photos of the crowds at Donald Trump’s 2017 inauguration as compared to Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration is also referenced. 

Fierce local battles over power lines are a bottleneck for clean energy
Jun 26, 2022
CNBC
Steve Cicala, Associate Professor, Department of Economics explains why it is difficult to implement transmission line infrastructure to deliver clean energy and meet climate goals. 

Biblioracle: My best books of 2022 (so far) list, including 'Ancestor Trouble' and 'Foreverland'
Jun 25, 2022
Chicago Tribune
Lenore Stern Professor in Social Science in the Department of Sociology Natasha Warikoo’s book “Race at the Top: Asian Americans and Whites in Pursuit of the American Dream in Suburban Schools” is noted among the best books of 2022 in the Biblioracle column.

Why Biden's Federal Gas Tax Holiday Would Be Bad For America
Jun 22, 2022
Forbes
Gilbert Metcalf, John Dibiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, responds to the Biden administration’s idea for a gas tax holiday, noting “it will increase demand and just drive gasoline prices up.

Genetic link found for musical rhythm
Jun 18, 2022
NewsChannel 5
Ani Patel, Professor, Department of Psychology, comments on a study that has found genetic links to the ability to move in time to musical rhythm. 

D.C.'s Enslavers Got Reparations. Freed People Got Nothing.
Jun 17, 2022
Politico
Kris Manjapra, Professor, Department of History, examines the 1862 Washington, D.C., emancipation process, noting that it was “a portrait of the troubling character of American emancipation on a national scale.” 

DuBois Freedom Center, First in North America, Named in Great Barrington, Mass.
Jun 17, 2022
Welcome to Our Time Press
Kendra Field, Associate Professor, Department of History, comments on the significance of the new The W.E.B. Du Bois Center for Freedom and Democracy in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, a partner with Tufts’ African American Trail Project. Field, the center’s historian-in-residence, and Mellon Assistant Professor Kerri Greenidge are pictured.

To treat or to tolerate (pathogens), that is the question
Jun 16, 2022
Science Daily 
Michael Levin, Distinguished Professor, Department of Biology, comments on his new collaborative experiments that found genetic and biological mechanisms that enhance disease tolerance intadpoles, saying the research “could offer a sorely needed alternative approach to treating disease."

Juneteenth celebrates just one of the United States' 20 emancipation days - and the history of how emancipated people were kept unfree needs to be remembered, too
Jun 15, 2022
The Conversation
Kris Manjapra, Professor, Department of History, discusses emancipation myths and realities as well as the meaning of Juneteenth. Manjapra is the author of “Black Ghost of Empire.” 

Researchers: Fireflies are being threatened by artificial light, habitat loss
Jun 10, 2022
TribLIVE
Sara Lewis, Professor, Department of Biology, comments on how artificial light at night impacts fireflies, and the 2019 research of biology Ph.D. student Avalon Owens on thesame topic is referenced. Lewis is the author of “Silent Sparks: The Wondrous World of Fireflies.”

Book Notes: 3 new books examine the ongoing struggle for emancipation
Jun 10, 2022
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 
Professor of History Kris Manjapra’s new book “Black Ghost of Empire: The Long Death of Slavery and the Failure of Emancipation” is on this list of recommended books.

The COVID-19 pandemic's impact on treatment decision-making for older patients with kidney disease
Jun 7, 2022
Medical Xpress 
Keren Ladin, Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, is quoted about collaborative research she led examining how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted treatment decisions of older patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

Race at the Top: white and Asian Americans and the push for equity in education
Jun 6, 2022
The Guardian
In this Q&A, Natasha Warikoo, Lenore Stern Professor in Social Science, Department of Sociology, discusses her new book “Race at the Top: Asian Americans and Whites in Pursuit of the American Dream inSuburban Schools.”

BPS in transition; rededicating the Shaw 54th Regiment Memorial 
Jun 3, 2022
WBUR
Kerri Greenidge, Mellon Assistant Professor, Department of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora, joins this episode of “Radio Boston” to discuss therededication of the Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment Civil War Memorial in Boston. 

A conversation with Kamran Rastegar about The Blind Owl
June 2, 2022
BBC
Professor in the International Literary and Cultural Studies Department Kamran Rastegar was featured on an episode of the BBC-Persian hosted podcast “Shirazeh.” Rastegar discussed his research on the New Zealand translator and scholar D.P. Costello, who translated the modernist Persian masterpiece novel The Blind Owl(The interview is in Persian.)

How the Multiverse could break the scientific method
Jun 1, 2022
Big Think
Leonard and Jane Holmes Bernstein Professorship in Evolutionary Science Alexander Vilenkin's theorem about the existence of multiple universes is referenced as the beginning of the multiverse controversy.

Community as Rebellion
May 31, 2022
WNYC Studios
Mellon Associate Professor, Department of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Lorgia Garcia-Pena joins “The Takeway” to discuss how her experiences working at Harvard University informed her new book “Community As Rebellion: A Syllabus for Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color.”

The Role of Nuclear Power in Our Energy Future
May 29, 2022
econofact
Gilbert Metcalf, John Dibiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, joins the “Econofact Podcast” to discuss the role of nuclear power in America’s shift towards greener, carbon-free energy sources. 

How 'alternative facts' threaten US democracy
May 25, 2022
Al Jazeera
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, is quoted about how Americans appear to hold biased positions about basic political facts. 

The struggle to find the origins of time
May 24, 2022
Astronomy Magazine
Leonard and Jane Holmes Bernstein Professorship in Evolutionary Science Alexander Vilenkin’s work on the eternal inflation theory of the universe is highlighted in this article.

White and Asian Students Fight to Win the Meritocracy Game
May 18, 2022
WNYC Studios
Natasha Warikoo, Lenore Stern Professor in Social Science, Department of Sociology, joins this episode of “The Takeaway” to discuss her new book, “Race at the Top: Asian Americans and Whites in Pursuit of the American Dream in Suburban Schools.” 

Pulitzer Prizes 2022: A Guide to the Winning Books and Finalists
May 9, 2022
The New York Times
“Chasing Me to My Grave: An Artist’s Memoir of the Jim Crow South,” by Winfred Rembert, in collaboration with Erin Kelly, Professor, Department of Philosophy, is the winner of the2022 Pulitzer Prize for Biography.

Massachusetts needs free college for all 
May 5, 2022
Bay State Banner
Justin Hollander writes this opinion piece calling for Massachusetts to make public college free for all residents “to ensure a fair and equitable higher education system.”

Sheldon Krimsky, Who Warned of Profit Motive in Science, Dies at 80
May 5, 2022
The New York Times
This remembrance of longtime UEP and TUSM professor Sheldon Krimsky, who passed away on April 23, chronicles his life and career. 

Spring 2022

'An ecological miracle': Taiwan's fireflies are flirting in the dark again
Apr 22, 2022
The Guardian
Biology Ph.D. student Avalon Owens and Sara Lewis, Professor, Department of Biology, are quoted from their May 2021 The Conversation article in which they outline ways to protect fireflies and other animals at risk from human-caused light sources.

Political experts rate Boston Mayor Michelle Wu's first 6 months in office
Apr 21, 2022
WCVB-Ch. 5
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, comments on Boston Mayor Michelle Wu’s first six months in office in this news segment.

5 Mistakes Parents Make With Teens and Tweens
Apr 21, 2022
WebMD Health
Richard Lerner, Bergstrom Chair in Applied Developmental Science, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study & Human Development is among the experts offering advice for parenting teens and tweens.

Pakistan's new prime minister wants to reconnect with the West, but is the United States ready?
Apr 20, 2022
Canada Express News
Ayesha Jalal, Mary Richardson Professor of History, is quoted about Pakistan’s relationship with the U.S. and the challenges prime minister-elect Shehbaz Sharif faces in improving relations with the West.

How the image of a besieged and victimized Russia came to be so ingrained in the country's psyche
Apr 18, 2022
The Conversation
International Literary and Cultural Studies Professor Gregory Carleton examines Russia’s self-created myth that it is a geopolitical fortress and protects itself from enemies seeking to destroy its culture and history.

Some Democrats fear a 2020 repeat as cash flows to long-shot candidates
Apr 18, 2022
CNN
Eitan Hersh, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, discusses the worrisome trend of Democratic campaign donations directed towards long-shot candidates instead of strategic races.

Elon Musk wants Twitter's algorithm to be public. It's not that simple.
Apr 16, 2022
The Washington Post
Nick Seaver, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, is quoted about the complex nature of therecommendation algorithms of social media platforms, such as Twitter, and thechallenges of analyzing these data. 

'Rent' reaches milestone moment as it ends national tour in San Diego
Apr 15, 2022
The San Diego Union-Tribune
A&S Dean of Academic Affairs and Nathan and Alice Gantcher Professor of Judaic Studies in the Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Heather Nathans shares why she believes the musical “Rent” was a game changer when it debuted. 

Why high gas prices aren't necessarily good for the climate
Apr 14, 2022
Grist
Gilbert Metcalf, John Dibiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, is quoted in this article about gas taxes, noting, “The right gas tax would be about a dollar a gallon.” 

What's next for Pakistan after Imran Khan's ouster?
Apr 13, 2022
The Conversation
Ayesha Jalal, Mary Richardson Professor of History, discusses thesituation in Pakistan after the ousting of Prime Minister Imran Khan and the election of Shehbaz Sharif. 

When Russian troops arrived, their relatives disappeared
Apr 12, 2022
MSN
Oxana Shevel, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, is quoted in this updated Vox article about patterns of abduction or arbitrary arrests of journalists and government officials by Russian forces in Ukraine.

Ukrainian identity solidified for 30 years. Putin ignored the science
Apr 12, 2022
Science News Online
Oxana Shevel, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, comments on Ukraine’s nationalism and identity saying, “in some paradoxical twist, [Russian President Vladimir] Putin is basically unifying the Ukrainian nation” with his attacks on the country. 

Barbra Streisand, Beanie Feldstein, and the original "Funny Girl," Fanny Brice
Apr 10, 2022
CBS News
Barbara Wallace Grossman, Professor, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, discusses famed Ziegfeld Follies comedienne Fanny Brice, whose life is the inspiration for the Broadway musical “Funny Girl.” Grossman is the author of the biography “Funny Woman: The Life and Times of Fanny Brice.” 

Is Michelle Wu America's food justice mayor? 
Apr 10, 2022
Salon
Julian Agyeman, Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric and Debate, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, says Boston Mayor Michelle Wu’s food and farm policy agenda is “an inclusive agenda, this is a visionary agenda, and this is an achievable agenda over the medium term.”

The 20th-Century History Behind Russia's Invasion of Ukraine
Apr 9, 2022
Design & Fashion
Oxana Shevel, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, shares insight into historical factors behind Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. 

What is going on in Pakistan? And why has the US been dragged into it? 
Apr 8, 2022
Albany Democrat-Herald
Ayesha Jalal, Mary Richardson Professor of History, discusses thecurrent situation in Pakistan.

Latinos have many skin tones. Colorism means they're treated differently.
Mar 31, 2022
The Washington Post
Lorgia Garcia-Pena, Mellon Associate Professor in the Department of Studies in Race, Colonialism and Diaspora, comments on how colonialism impacted the understanding of race and ethnicity across Latin America.

Greco-Roman Studies and the Future of Europe
Mar 28, 2022
Classical Continuum
Gregory Crane, Winnick Family Chair in Technology and Entrepreneurship, Department of Classical Studies, has published this article in Classical Continuum. 

Special Feature: Life as an LGBTQ+ Physicist
Mar 28, 2022
physics.aps.org
Tim Atherton, Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, joins the inaugural episode of “This Is Physics”, thePhysics Magazine podcast, to discuss his collaborative research examining theclimate for LGBT+ people within the physics community.

Ending college affirmative action could have ripple effect for Black, Latino students
Jan 26, 2022
NBC News
Natasha Warikoo, Professor, Department of Sociology, is quoted about the effects of a potential Supreme Court ruling on affirmative action-based college admissions programs on Black and Latino students.

Which Map Would You Choose for Pennsylvania's Congressional Districts
Jan 25, 2022
nbc10.com
A Pennsylvania congressional district map created by Professor of Mathematics Moon Duchin of the MGGG Redistricting Lab at Tisch College is among the maps being considered by the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, which will select a final map for use in the 2022 election on January 30. 

The Dallas Museum of Art is planning a major expansion
Jan 25, 2022
heromag.net
Andrew McClellan, Professor, Department of History of Art and Architecture, is quoted about museum funding sources inthis in-depth piece on the Dallas Museum of Art’s planned expansion.

Telehealth might be best as a supplement to office visits, not a replacement
Jan 25, 2022
techandsciencepost.com
Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy and Community Health Keren Ladin discusses research she led that found that older patients with chronic kidney disease, as well as their care partners and healthcare providers, have a range of concerns regarding telehealth care.

Many college Republicans didn't vote for Trump in 2020. His racist rhetoric may be why.
Jan 20, 2022
The Washington Post
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, co-authors this piece on 2020 Cooperative Election Study findings that revealed young Republicans with a college degree were least likely to vote for Donald Trump.

Nonfiction Book Review: Black Ghost of Empire: The Long Death of Slavery and the Failure of Emancipation by Kris Manjapra
Jan 19, 2022
Publishers Weekly
This is a starred review calls “Black Ghost of Empire: The Long Death of Slavery and the Failure of Emancipation,” the forthcoming book by Professor of History Kris Manjapra, “an essential contribution to understanding the legacy of slavery.”

Podcast: Keren Ladin on Why Medicare's Advance Care Planning Payment Is A Work In Progress
Jan 18, 2022
Health Affairs
Keren Ladin, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy and Community Health, joins this episode of the “A Health Podyssey” to discuss her research that found limited use of advance care planning billing codes among clinicians despite simple payment options being readily available. 

Open enrollment at Lyric Stage
Jan 13, 2022
Baystate Banner
Professor of the Practice, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Maurice Emmanuel Parent is appearing in the Lyric Stage’s “Mr. Parent,” a one-man show based on his years working both as a Boston Public School teacher and a theater actor. The play runs from January 13 to February 6.

Redistricting trial over, NC's political future pending
Jan 9, 2022
Restoration NewsMedia
Professor of Mathematics Moon Duchin of the MGGG Redistricting Lab at Tisch College is quoted from testimony in a trial to determine whether North Carolina’s election maps are constitutional ahead of the 2022 elections. 

Do Your Doctor's Political Views Affect Your Care? 
Jan 7, 2022
freakanomics.com
Associate Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh joins this podcast to discuss how doctors’ political views impact the care they provide.

Jody Azzouni on What Is and Isn't Real
Jan 3, 2022
What the Hack?
Professor of Philosophy Jody Azzouni joins “What the Hack?” podcast to discuss theconcept of nominalism, the belief that general ideas and concepts are not “things” but labels we use to talk about things.

Fall 2021

Scientists Create 'Living Machines' with Algorithms, Frog Cells
Dec 17, 2021
Bloomberg
This article highlights the latest xenobot research from A&S biologists Michael Levin and Douglas Blackiston, in collaboration with University of Vermont researchers, that found living robots can reproduce in an entirely different manner than any animal or plant known to science. 

Washington Is Preparing for the Wrong War With China
Dec 16, 2021
Foreign Affairs
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley co-authors this piece on how a U.S.- Chinese war over Taiwan would play out and how the Biden administration can prepare for such a scenario.

Axios Latino
Dec 16, 2021
Axios
This newsletter highlights the new book co-authored by A&S political scientist Deborah Schildkraut, "States of Belonging: Immigration Policies, Attitudes, and Inclusion."

'I regret that Pakistan has still not formally apologised'
Dec 16, 2021
The Daily Star 
Ayesha Jalal
, Mary Richardson Professor of History, discusses the circumstance in Pakistan prior to thebirth of Bangladesh in 1971.

A Call for Pragmatic Climate Policies
Dec 14, 2021
Energy Central
Gilbert Metcalf, John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, a long-time advocate for a U.S. carbon tax, discusses U.S. climate change policies. His 2019 book “Paying for Pollution: Why a Carbon Tax is Good for America” is also referenced. 

New Book: States of Belonging: Immigration Policies, Attitudes, and Inclusion
Dec 14, 2021
RSF Review
This is a book review of “States of Belonging: Immigration Policies, Attitudes, and Inclusion,” co-authored by Professor and Chair in the Department of Political Science Deborah Schildkraut.

Scientists invent first self-reproducing robots just like in the Matrix
Dec 14, 2021
www.the-sun.com
The latest xenobot research from A&S biologists Michael Levin and Douglas Blackiston, in collaboration with University of Vermont researchers, has found that living robots can reproduce, without any manipulation, in an entirely different manner than any animal or plant known to science. 

Why the demographic transition is speeding up
Dec 10, 2021
The Economist 
This article cites findings from a paper that Enrico Spolaore, Seth Merrin Professor, Department of Economics, co-authored regarding fertility behavior.

Art students give old jewelry a major makeover
Dec 10, 2021
WBUR
SMFA Professor of the Practice Tanya Crane collaborated with MassArt on the course Radical Jewelry Makeover, which gave students the opportunity to reinvent donated jewelry. Pieces are on view at North Bennet Street School until January 20.

A new mayor, a new BDPA chief? This time it's different
Dec 9, 2021
The Boston Globe
Julian Agyeman, Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric and Debate, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, provides insight into Mayor Michelle Wu's vision for planning and development in Boston. Agyeman is part of Wu's transition committee. 

Study IDs Telehealth Concerns in Care of Older Adults with Advanced CKD
Dec 9, 2021
Renal & Urology News
Keren Ladin, Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health and the Department of Occupational Therapy, led a new survey that found that older patients with chronic kidney disease, as well as their care partners and healthcare providers, have a range of concerns regarding telehealth care. 

A Conversation with Gib Metcalf
Dec 9, 2021
Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center
Gilbert Metcalf, John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, Department of Economics, discusses pragmatic climate change policies for withstanding Washington’s political division in this podcast episode.

Scientists have discovered the first self-replicating living robots
Dec 6, 2021
National Public Radio
Michael Levin, Distinguished Professor, Department of Biology, discusses the latest collaborative xenobot research, which found that living robots can reproduce, without any manipulation, in an entirely different manner than any animal or plant known to science.

Changes to outdated Medicaid limits could improve eligibility for vulnerable seniors
Dec 6, 2021
Medical Xpress
Melissa McInerney, Professor, Department of Economics, is a collaborator on a new study recommending four solutions states could implement to improve Medicaid eligibility for seniors.

Scientists Unveiled the World's First Living Robots Last Year. Now, They Can Reproduce
Dec 2, 2021
smithsonian.com
The latest xenobot research from A&S biologists Michael Levin and Douglas Blackiston, in collaboration with University of Vermont researchers, has found that living robots can reproduce, without any manipulation, in an entirely different manner than any animal or plant known to science.

The World Has No Answer for Migration
Nov 30, 2021
Foreign Policy
Research from Associate Professor of Political Science Kelly Greenhill’s book Weapons of Mass Migration: Forced Displacement, Coercion, and Foreign Policy is cited in this article about Belarus’ exploitation of migrants for political gain. 

World's first living robots can now reproduce, scientists say
Nov 29, 2021
CNN
The latest xenobot research from A&S biologists Michael Levin and Douglas Blackiston, in collaboration with University of Vermont researchers, has found that living robots can reproduce, without any manipulation, in an entirely different manner than any animal or plant known to science. Levin is quoted. 

Outside groups pour millions into Boston's mayoral race
Oct 28, 2021
The Boston Globe
Jeffrey Berry, John Richard Skuse, Class of 1941, Professor of Political Science, comments on outside special interest groups contributing to political campaigns.

Does Knoxville give white voters a veto on Black candidates? 
Oct 27, 2021
thetennesseedailynews.com
Associate Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh comments on Knoxville, Tennessee’s unusual council election system in this Knoxville News-Sentinel article.

Madagascar's Got Talent: Lemurs That Sing With Rhythm
Oct 26, 2021
The New York Times
Professor of Psychology Ani Patel comments on new research examining singing and rhythmic abilities among Indri indri lemurs, noting that “only a few primate species sing, so they are precious resources in our search for the evolutionary origins of human musicality.”

Luxo, Jr. and Mystique inspire novel approaches to shapeshifting materials
Oct 22, 2021
Ars Technica
Timothy Atherton, Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, is quoted about collaborative research developing a groundbreaking method for altering the shape of liquid crystal materials without any external stimulus such as heat or light.

Amherst College to end legacy admissions advantage for children of alumni
Oct 20, 2021
The Boston Globe
Professor of Sociology Natasha Warikoo comments on Amherst College’s decision to end legacy admissions.

Arming Biological Nanobots to Deliver Drugs Inside Our Bodies
Oct 20, 2021
LabioTech
Michael Levin, University Professor, Department of Biology, is quoted regarding Xenobots in this article exploring the potential for nanobots to deliver targeted drugs in the body.

'Coding is the new literacy': How STEM toys teach kids programming skills
Oct 20, 2021
CNN
Marina Bers, Professor, Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, discusses her research and her startup KinderLab Robotics in this CNN segment. 

With campaign donations, Boston city workers have staked out their preferred mayoral candidate
Oct 19, 2021
The Boston Globe
Eitan Hersh, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, comments on the City of Boston’s mayoral race saying “[Michelle Wu]’s clearly articulating a vision that has more dramatic changes.”

Scientists Develop novel 'shapeshifting' liquid crystal
Oct 19, 2021
Phys.org
Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy Timothy Atherton is quoted about collaborative research developing a groundbreaking method for altering the shape of liquid crystal materials without any external stimulus such as heat or light

Yolanda López's first museum show opens Saturday, just weeks after the artist's death
Oct 15, 2021
National Public Radio
Adriana Zavala, Associate Professor, Department of History of Art and Architecture, notes that the work of artist Yolanda López, who recently died at age 78, began getting deserved attention only in the last decade or so.

Pritzker’s energy policy promises 40% renewable power by 2030. But Illinois has fallen short of earlier targets.
Oct 11, 2021
The Chicago Tribune
Steve Cicala, assistant professor, Department of Economics, is quoted extensively about the new, ambitious renewable energy policy proposed by Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker. 

Flatworms Are Metal
Oct 8, 2021
The Atlantic
Distinguished Professor of Biology Michael Levin shares some findings from his years of researching planarian memory and regeneration.

Coal prices are rising, but producers can't keep up with demand
Oct 7, 2021
Marketplace
Steve Cicala, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, comments on the international spike in coal prices in this radio segment, which aired on more than 60 stations.

Social Capital in Black Communities is Often Overlooked
Oct 1, 2021
Scientific American
Associate Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted about how "political hobbyism," or treating politics more like entertainment, impacts local politics.

Republicans Would Have Less Of An Advantage In The Legislature Under Commission's Proposed Maps
Oct 1, 2021
Wisconsin Public Radio
Moon Duchin, professor, Department of Mathematics, discussed proposed redistricting maps for Wisconsin during a September 30 virtual public hearing. The People's Maps Commission created the maps using software developed by Duchin.

Yields stabilize on mixed economic data, month-end buying
Sep 30, 2021
Financial Post
Brian Bethune, lecturer, Department of Economics, comments in this Reuters article on why U.S. Treasury yields stabilized at the end of September. 

Boycott targets college admissions boost given to children of alumni at Harvard, other elite schools
Sep 25, 2021
The Boston Globe
Natasha Warikoo, professor, Department of Sociology, is quoted about a new national grass-roots campaign to end legacy admissions preferences for families of alumni at elite universities across the U.S.

Saadi Yacef: 1928-2021; resistance fighter and actor
Sep 24, 2021
Financial Times
Hugh Roberts, Professor, Department of History, is quoted in this obituary of Saadi Yacef, Algerian independence fighter, who spearheaded Algeria’s struggle for freedom.

Prof. Lucy Der Manuelian, Pioneering Scholar of Armenian Art History and Culture, Dies
Sep 23, 2021
mirrorspectator.com
A&S art historian Christina Maranci, chair, Department of the History of Art and Architecture, shares this tribute to Lucy Der Manuelian, who died on September 20. Der Manuelian was the founder and first occupant of the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara T. Oztemel Professor of Armenian Art, the title that Maranci now holds.

A Black Theater Flourished in New York. 200 Years Ago.
Sep 22, 2021
The New York Times
Dean of Academic Affairs and the Nathan and Alice Gantcher Professor, Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Heather Nathans is quoted in this history of New York City’s African Theater, which is considered to be the first Black theater in the United States.

Living orbs of light
Sep 21, 2021
Aeon Magazine
Multiple research studies led by Professor of Biology Sara Lewis examining threats to global firefly populations are highlighted in this article.

Legislative Staff Debugs Climate Plan as Manchin Threatens Its Existence
Sep 21, 2021
Talking Points Memo
Steve Cicala, assistant professor, Department of Economics, comments on the Clean Electricity Payment Program, currently part of upcoming legislative agenda on climate.  

Massachusetts lawmakers should move urgently on climate threats
Sep 19, 2021
The Boston Globe
Environmental Studies Part-time Lecturer Steve Long was quoted in this Boston Globe piece. Long is the Director of Government Relations at The Nature Conservancy.

Fact check: No evidence 'lost votes' or 'ghost votes' affected Arizona's election outcome
Sep 15, 2021
USA Today
Brian Schaffner, Newhouse Professor of Civic Studies, Department of Political Science, fact checks one of the voter fraud claims ina new Arizona canvassing report.

Can a mathematician help prevent gerrymandering in Virginia?
Sep 12, 2021
The Washington Post 
Moon Duchin, professor, Department of Mathematics, is quoted extensively about her work with the MGGG Redistricting Lab at Tisch College using math and data science to help fight gerrymandering. A 2017 photo of Duchin at a Tufts event is also included. 

Is the NFL ready for all its rowdy friends? 
Sep 10, 2021
Toronto Star
Samuel Sommers is quoted throughout this article about concerns related to fan misbehavior during this football season. Sommers is the author of “This Is Your Brain on Sports.”

Removing urban highways can improve neighborhoods blighted by decades of racist policies
Sep 7, 2021
The Conversation
Julian Agyeman, Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric and Debate, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, co-authors this piece calling for more funding from President Joseph Biden’s infrastructure bill to support "highway removal and related improvements in marginalized neighborhoods” to address racist infrastructure in the U.S.