Faculty in the News

Fall 2022

The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family
December 4, 2022
WCVB Channel 5
Assistant Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge joins this episode of “Cityline” to discuss her new book “The Grimkés: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family.”

In the First Three Quarters of 2022, Renewable Energy Sources Produced Around 25% of The Country’s Electricity.
December 3, 2022 
enviro360
Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala is quoted about the importance of continuing to invest in renewable energy sources in the US.

Jazz/Film Review: “An Evening of Jazz Healing” - A Thing of Beauty and Sharing
December 3, 2022
artsfuse
Senior Lecturer in the Music Department Michael Ullman reviews “An Evening of Jazz Healing,” which took place on December 1 at the Coolidge Corner Theater.

What Zero-COVID Protests Mean for China and the World
December 2, 2022
Player FM
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley joins this episode of the “In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt” podcast to discuss the zero-COVID protests against the Chinese government and their potential impacts.

Opinion: When racism comes from inside the house
December 2, 2022
Statepress
This opinion piece quotes from Professor in the Department of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Lorgia García Peña’s 2020 piece “Dismantling Anti-Blackness Together.”

Podcast links: telling stories with data
December 2, 2022
abnormalreturns
This podcast roundup includes Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee’s episode on “Econofact Chats,” during which she discussed charitable giving and volunteering in the U.S. with Fletcher’s Michael Klein.

The role of bots in U.S. Real estate development online communication
December 1, 2022
Computers, Environment and Urban Systems
Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning Justin Hollander co-wrote an article exploring how bots are a dangerous influence on the discourse that happens in response to real estate development projects.

At Home in the Asylum
December 1, 2022 
The American Scholar
Mary Richardson Professor of History Ayesha Jalal is quoted in this article examining the work of Saadat Hasan Manto as it related to India’s Partition. (This is a subscriber-only piece.)

Schooling the system: Prof. Kelli Morgan is dismantling racist practices in art museums
November 30, 2022
The Bay State Banner
Professor of the Practice Kelli Morgan is on a mission to break down exclusionary and racist practices in cultural institutions once and for all.

Will the Supreme Court Kill Affirmative Action in Admissions?
November 29, 2022
EAB
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo joins the “Office Hours with EAB” podcast to discuss her new book, Is Affirmative Action Fair? The Myth of Equity in College Admissions, and the potential impacts of two race-conscious admissions cases before the Supreme Court.

Charitable Giving in the United States
November 28, 2022 
EconoFact
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee joins the “Econofact Podcast” to discuss charitable giving and volunteering in the U.S.

U.S. Renewable Energy Will Surge Past Coal and Nuclear by Year’s End
November 22, 2022
Scientific American
Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala is optimistic that the Inflation Reduction Act will spark a renewable boom but notes some of the limits to the law’s impact.

Tufts University offers ‘Anti-Racist Curatorial Practice’ certificate
November 21, 2022 
The College Fix
Director of Curatorial Studies Kelli Morgan discusses the Anti-Racist Curatorial Practice certificate program she developed, which offers an opportunity to learn about rooting out racism in museums.

Blessed are the (tiny) cheesemakers
November 17, 2022
Knowable Magazine
Associate Professor of Biology Ben Wolfe is quoted in an article about the fungi and bacteria within cheese that play a big role in shaping the flavor and texture of different varieties. 

Ending affirmative action will be an 'earthquake' for colleges, companies
November 16, 2022
Newsweek
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo shares her perspective about how the college admissions process might be impacted by the outcome of two race-conscious admissions cases before the Supreme Court. (This article appears in one additional outlet. Additional commentary from Warikoo appears at the conclusion of this edition of Tufts in the News.)

Researchers find rats move to the same tempos in music that humans like
November 16, 2022 
NPR
Professor of Psychology Aniruddh Patel’s comments on research showing that rats synchronize body movements with music tempos. (Patel’s segment begins at the 1:52 mark. This “All Thing Considered” segment aired on 80 additional NPR outlets.)

The First Family of Abolition
November 15, 2022 
publicseminar.org
Assistant Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge joins the “Why Now?” podcast to discusses her new book “The Grimkés: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family.”

Data overload is a real thing
November 15, 2022 
Diginomica
Research Assistant Professor of Biology Erik Hoel’s research on the causal emergence theory is discussed in this article.

Simulations Using a Quantum Computer Show the Technology’s Current Limits
November 14, 2022 
Physics.org
Professor of Physics and Astronomy Peter Love comments on new findings examining the use of quantum computers in real-world, everyday research, saying “Compared to our expectations in 2005, they are absolutely amazing, but they also show how much work is still ahead of us.” 

Animal Ag Workers Face Many Hazards With Few Protections
November 14, 2022
Civil Eats
Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department Alex Blanchette is quoted about the lack of collective bargaining and unionizing opportunities for animal-agriculture industry workers.

Jazz Album Review: Jussi Reijonen’s “Three Seconds/ Kolme Toista” - “One Hell of a Journey”
November 13, 2022
artsfuse
Senior Lecturer in the Department of Music Michael Ullman reviewed the new album from jazz guitarist Jussi Reijonen entitled “Three Seconds/ Kolme Toista.”

Read an Excerpt from “What Is African Art?” 
November 10, 2022 
The University of Chicago Press Blog
This blog post includes an excerpt from History of Art and Architecture Professor Peter Probst’s new book “What Is African Art?”

Atheist Crusaders by Phillip E. Johnson
November 10, 2022
Touchstone Magazine
Professor in the Philosophy department Daniel Dennett is briefly noted as a leading member of the New Atheism intellectual movement.

The science of dance
November 9, 2022
Deutsche Welle | German wave
Professor in the Psychology Aniruddh Patel’s 2009 research with Snowball, the sulphur-crested cockatoo who spontaneously created dance moves on his own, is referenced in this article, which appears in six additional outlets.

Jazz Album Review: The Vince Guaraldi Trio - “Peanuts” and Beyond
November 9, 2022 
Art Fuse
Senior Lecturer in the Department of Music Michael Ullman reviews albums of The Vince Guaraldi Trio, including their recordings of Peanuts cartoon specials.

What is affirmative action, anyway? 4 essential reads
November 7, 2022 
The Conversation
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo is quoted from her October 6 The Conversation piece -highlighted and linked here as an essential read- about the impact that outlawing affirmative action would have on higher education.

Imran Khan shot: How attack will affect protest campaign led by Pakistan’s ousted leader
November 4, 2022
The Conversation
Mary Richardson Professor of History Ayesha Jalal discusses the implications of an apparent assassination attempt on Imran Khan, a former Pakistan prime minister who was shot in the leg on November 3 as he led a protest against the government.

How Does Affirmative Action Affect College Admissions?
November 3, 2022 
US News & World Report
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo is quoted throughout this article exploring how affirmative action works within the college admissions process and how it might be impacted by the outcome of two race-conscious admissions cases before the Supreme Court. 

Hayao Miyazaki’s ‘Shuna’s Journey,’ Finally Translated Into English
November 2, 2022
The New York Times
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Napier reviews the first English translation of the picture book Shuna’s Journey by Hayao Miyazaki.

How serial killers captured popular culture
November 1, 2022 
Phys.org
Sociology Lecturer Brett Nava-Coulter discusses the fascination with serial killers in pop culture and media. 

Patrick Duffy and Linda Purl Break Bread To Keep the Spark in Their Relationship
November 1, 2022 
Woman’s World
Associate Professor of Biology Benjamin Wolfe is quoted from a 2021 Tufts Now news story on the science of sourdough bread and other fermented foods. 

'Where is Nancy?': How threats against women in power are tied to threats against democracy
October 31, 2022
19th News
Professor of Sociology Sarah Sobieraj is quoted about how “outrage industry” media, uses “this [extreme] rhetoric intentionally for political gain to change people’s thoughts and behaviors.”

Rembert’s Rep Rises At NXTHVN Celebration
October 31, 2022
New Haven Independent
Professor of Philosophy Erin Kelly is quoted in this article about a celebration of Winfred Rembert's art at NXTHVN art gallery. Kelly collaborated on Rembert’s memoir “Chasing Me to My Grave: An Artist’s Memoir of the Jim Crow South.” (A photo of Kelly is included in the article, which appears in one additional outlet.)

How a faulty understanding of college admissions hurts affirmative action
October 31, 2022 
The Washington Post
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo writes this piece outlining why “affirmative action can and should continue to play a role in the future of higher education.” Warikoo is the author of the book Is Affirmative Action Fair? The Myth of Equity in College Admissions.

Supreme Court is hearing arguments on the fate of affirmative action. Follow live updates
October 31, 2022
The Boston Globe
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo is among the experts contributing to live updates during the October 31 Supreme Court arguments on affirmative action.

Jazz Album Review: Newvelle Records’ Renewal Collection - A Beautifully Compact Clarity
October 30, 2022 
artsfuse.org
Senior Lecturer Michael Ullman reviews Newell Records’ “Renewal Collection,” featuring compositions by Elan Mehler, Michael Blake, Dave Liebman, and Nadje Noordhuis.

Slavery’s Indelible Stain on a White Abolitionist Legend
October 29, 2022
New York Times
The New York Times reviewed Assistant Professor in Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Kerri Greenidge's book The Grimkes, which provides a nuanced, revisionist account of an American family best known for a pair of white abolitionist sisters.

How a Royal Visit Helped Weaken the Crown’s Grip on the Caribbean
October 29, 2022
The Nation
Professor of History Kris Manjapra is quoted about the British government’s compensation to former slave-owning families and organizations despite reluctance to provide reparations to former colonies.

From a near-lynching and prison to a Pulitzer Prize. A Connecticut artist and writer’s life story resonates today.
October 28, 2022
Hartford Courant
Professor of Philosophy Erin Kelly discusses her collaboration with Winfred Rembert on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Chasing Me to My Grave: An Artist’s Memoir of the Jim Crow South (Bloomsbury 2021). (This content is available to subscribers only, but it can be viewed for free on Yahoo.)

Molecular glue stabilizes single-atom catalysts
October 28, 2022
Chemical & Engineering News
John Wade Professor of Chemistry Charles Sykes discusses new research developing a “molecular glue” that stabilizes metal atoms in place, but leaves them catalytically active, which is “an impressive example of engineering at the atomic scale.”

On #EconTwitter, #MeToo anger is boiling over
October 28, 2022
19th News
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee is quoted in an article about abuse and harassment in the male dominated field of economics.

Harvard SCOTUS case could change affirmative action
October 26, 2022
WBUR
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo discusses what affirmative action is and how two Supreme Court cases could drastically change the way colleges and universities handle the admissions process. 

Social ties critical to surviving disasters
October 26, 2022
Bay State Banner
Interim Chair and Professor in Urban and Environmental Policy (UEP) Justin Hollander wrote an op-ed about social connectedness during times of extreme weather, co-authored by UEP Graduate Student Vernon K. Walker, Professor of the Practice in Mechanical Engineering James Intriligator, and Lecturer at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy Joshua Ellsworth.

Celebrating the life and legacy of New Haven resident Winfred Rembert
October 24, 2022
Where We Live
Professor of Philosophy Erin Kelly joins Connecticut Public’s “Where We Live” to discuss her collaboration with Winfred Rembert on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book “Chasing Me to My Grave: An Artist’s Memoir of the Jim Crow South.” (Kelly’s segment begins at 12:25.)

Tufts names new medical, fine arts deans
October 22, 2022 
The Business Journals
Incoming Dean of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Scheri Fultineer, along with Dean of the School of Medicine Helen Boucher, is briefly profiled as a newly appointed dean. (This article requires a subscription for access.) 

Five things you need to know today, and the horror genre rakes in the cash
October 20, 2022
The Business Journals    
This article quotes from and links to a 2018 Tufts Now news story in which Sol Gittleman Professor of History of Art and Architecture Malcolm Turvey explains the appeal of horror movies.

College admissions should be about fulfilling institutions’ missions—affirmative action can help them do it
October 20, 2022
Brookings Institution
In a new op-ed, Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo shows how admissions decisions serve to further the organizational needs of the university and suggests how selective colleges should take a “much stronger stance” in defending affirmative action. Warikoo is the author of the new book “Is Affirmative Action Fair?”

75 Years Post Partition: Can India and Pakistan Be Friends?
October 19, 2022
Talk Radio 702
Mary Richardson Professor of History Ayesha Jalal joins an episode of the podcast “The Agenda with Steve Paikin” to discuss the outlook for relations between India and Pakistan, where tensions remain high 75 years after the partition of the two countries.

'Autistic students' may experience 'gender queerness' more than others, teacher claims
October 19, 2022
WJLA
Assistant Professor in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study & Human Development Eileen Crehan comments on the timing for teaching students with autism about sex education. 

Will Artificial Intelligence Make Authors Obsolete?
October 19, 2022 
IEEE Computer Society
Research Assistant Professor of Biology Erik Hoel is quoted from a June 2021 Electric Literature piece examining his experiment to see if an artificial neural network called GPT-3 could have written his novel, “The Revelations.” 

A scientist created a robot out of frog cells. Could it unlock the secrets of human health?
October 18, 2022
Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Scientist Douglas Blackiston discusses Tufts’ ongoing collaborative xenobot research and the potential role of xenobot technology in healthcare.

Forum held on how to have a voice in council redistricting in Valpo
October 16, 2022
Chicago Tribune
This article mentions Districtr, the public mapping tool for redistricting developed by Professor of Mathematics Moon Duchin’s MGGG Redistricting Lab at Tisch College. (A subscription is required for access.)

Why China’s slowing growth makes it more dangerous
October 15, 2022
KERA
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley joins this “Think” podcast episode to discuss why he believes competition between America and China will peak in the 2020s and set up a showdown between authoritarianism and democracy. Beckley is the co-author, with Hal Brands, of “Danger Zone: The Coming Conflict with China.”

When Considering the Fairness of Race-Conscious Admissions, Don’t Forget to Get Over Yourself
October 14, 2022 
The Chronicle of Higher Education
In this interview, Professor of Sociology Natasha Warikoo discusses her new book Is Affirmative Action Fair? as well as topics related to "race, merit, and the powerful impulse that drives us to slap college stickers on the back of our cars."

Most Republican candidates endorse the ‘big lie’ — even when voters don’t
October 12, 2022 
The Washington Post
Professor of Political Science Brian Schaffner and fourth-year student Brendan Hartnett discuss their research examining whether candidates’ beliefs about the “big lie” are aligned with those of their state’s voters.

Despite Racist Jurors, Andre Thomas Remains on Texas’ Death Row
October 12, 2022 
Texas Observer
Professor of Psychology Sam Sommers comments on how “human beings are not always aware of the full extent of our own biases” in this article on the jury selection process for the 2005 trial for Andre Thomas in Texas. 

Disney's 'Ms. Marvel' episode shines spotlight on a dark part of South Asia's past
October 9, 2022
NBC News    
Mary Richardson Professor of History Ayesha Jalal comments on the fictionalized depiction of the Partition of India and Pakistan in the Disney+ series “Ms. Marvel,” saying “I would urge viewers to view it for the purposes of enjoyment and not as history.”

Chess, Fishing, Irish Dancing: Cheating Scandals Reveal Why We Care About Cheating  
October 7, 2022
NPR  
Professor of Psychology Samuel Sommers joins an episode of “Consider This from NPR”  to discuss why people cheat.

The cost of economic lurking
October 6, 2022
Marketplace
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee comments in this audio segment on the current state of the economy, which she calls “uncertain.”

Affirmative action bans make selective colleges less diverse – a national ban will do the same
October 6, 2022
The Conversation
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo examines how the racial and ethnic makeup of student bodies at selective colleges and universities will change if the Supreme Court decides to outlaw affirmative action.

People of colour have been shut out of the climate debate. Social justice is the key to the green agenda 
October 6, 2022
The Guardian
Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning Julian Agyeman examines how environmental issues in low-income areas have been ignored by activists who fail to recognize the importance of equity. 

SC Republicans, accused of racial gerrymandering, say politics, not race was paramount
October 4, 2022
The State
Professor of Mathematics Moon Duchin testified in a trial regarding the constitutionality of South Carolina’s new congressional map. 

Preventing Putin from using nuclear weapons
October 4, 2022 
The Hill
Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Justin Hollander examines the likelihood of offensive nuclear weapon deployment by Russia and how the West can utilize diplomacy to curb potential escalation. 

Michael Levin: Biology, Life, Aliens, Evolution, Embryogenesis & Xenobots
October 1, 2022
Lex Fridman Podcast
Professor of Biology Michael Levin joins the "Lex Fridman Podcast" for an in-depth discussion about his body of research.

What we talk about (now) when we talk about kids and gender
October 1, 2022
The Boston Globe
Professor of Sociology Susan Ostrander clarifies gender research theories regarding biological sex as a social construct. 

Michael Levin on the foundations of cognition
October 1, 2022
Thing in Itself with Ashar Khan
Professor of Biology Michael Levin joins this episode of “Thing in itself w/Ashar Khan” to discuss his body of research involving bioelectricity and the foundations of cognition.

In Rhode Island, a congressional race with national implications
September 27, 2022
Boston Globe
Associate Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh discusses political ideologies and important congressional races in New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

“A Trip to Infinity” and the Delicate Art of the Math Documentary
September 26, 2022 
The New Yorker
Professor of Mathematics Moon Duchin appears in the new Netflix documentary “A Trip to Infinity."

Spirited Away at 20: How Hayao Miyazaki's masterpiece united animation lovers worldwide
September 24, 2022
AV Club
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Napier is quoted throughout this article analyzing director Hayao Miyazaki's animated film “Spirited Away,” which was released 20 years ago in the United States. 

Don't blame bad dancers... it's in their genes
September 21, 2022
The Telegraph
Professor of Psychology Aniruddh Patel is quoted from a Vanderbilt University-generated news release on a study that has found genetic links to the ability to move in time to musical rhythm.

What The Queen's Death Means For The Future Of The Commonwealth
September 20, 2022
NPR
Mary Richardson Professor of History at Tufts University Ayesha Jalal contributed to an episode of NPR's "1A" program to discuss what Queen Elizabeth's passing means for the future of the British Commonwealth, a political organization comprised of 56 countries across the globe.

Will the Next Pandemic Start With Chickens?
September 19, 2022
The New Republic
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of Environmental Studies Alex Blanchette is quoted in a piece in The New Republic, exploring the origin of new viruses, pandemics, and bird flu.

Absent Federal Oversight of Animal Agriculture Safety, States and Others Step Up for Change
November 18, 2022 
Civil Eats
Associate Professor of Anthropology Alex Blanchette is quoted about the “fragility” of the animal-agriculture industry when it comes to safety and protection of workers. 

Legacy of colonialism makes grieving Queen complicated for some 
September 18, 2022
CBC News
In a CBC News clip, Professor of History Kris Manjapra reflects on the complex legacy of British colonialism.

The Queen’s death may open a new chapter in the Caribbean and force crucial conversations about colonialism
September 15, 2022
CNN
Professor of History Kris Manjapra reflects on the legacy of British colonialism in the Caribbean and why conversations about reparations need to be considered.

Here’s How Much Social Security Income Retirees Have Left After Medical Costs
September 15, 2022
Money Talks News
Professor of Economics Melissa McInerney comments on her new collaborative research that shows out-of-pocket medical spending can significantly cut into retirees’ Social Security benefits.

Are Asian Americans victims of racism or beneficiaries of whiteness? It's complex.
September 15, 2022
Boston Globe
In a new op-ed, Professor of Sociology Natasha Warikoo questions whether Asian Americans are the beneficiaries of privileges historically afforded to white people or are victims of racial discrimination. She concludes that the reality is complex and it’s time to discard this simplistic dichotomy.

15 Works of Nonfiction to Read This Fall
September 8, 2022
New York Times
Assistant Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge’s new book, “The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family,” is on a New York Times list of recommended nonfiction books.

Is MA as women-friendly as you think when it comes to election day?
September 8, 2022
Cape Cod Times
Lecturer in Political Science Kaitlin Kelly-Thompson comments on the real and symbolic impact of the election of women to positions of governance in this reprinted Wicked Local article.

Queen Used 'Good PR' to Remain Uncontroversial in South Asia
September 8, 2022
VOA News
Mary Richardson Professor of History at Tufts University Ayesha Jalal comments on how Queen Elizabeth II was viewed from the perspective of South Asia. 

Detachment Predicts Worse Posttraumatic Outcomes
September 8, 2022
MedScape
Professor of Psychology Lisa M. Shin is quoted in a MedScape article on how experiencing detachment after a traumatic event can predict worse post traumatic outcomes. Her comments are based on her journal article “Looking Through a Fog: What Persistent Derealization Can Teach Us About PTSD.”

A Rebel with a Cause: How I Breathed New Life into Monteverdi’s Saracen Warrior
September 7, 2022
The Guardian
Professor of the Practice in Music Kareem Roustom's work on a dance/opera entitled Clorinda Agonistes (Clorinda the Warrior) in London, England was highlighted in an op-ed in The Guardian. A review of the London premiere at the Sadler's Wells Theater was also reviewed in The Guardian.