Faculty in the News

Spring 2023

What happened when a Jewish professor created a right-wing curriculum for his liberal college students
May 23, 2024
The Canadian Jewish News
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh joins this episode of the Bonjour Chai podcast to discuss his course on modern American political conservatism.

Composer Kareem Roustom's 'Songs From Home' to premiere at benefit at Mechanics Hall
May 23, 2024
Worcester Magazine
Professor of the Practice in Music Kareem Roustom is quoted about his commissioned "Songs From Home" for string quartet, which will be receiving its world premiere on June 6 at "A Joyful Noise: A Concert to Benefit Neighborhood Strings" in Worcester.

Cathy Stanton, "Food Margins: Lessons from an Unlikely Grocer"
May 23, 2024
Player FM
Distinguished Senior Lecturer in Anthropology Cathy Stanton discusses her new book, Food Margins: Lessons from an Unlikely Grocer, in this New Books Network podcast episode.

Studio Ghibli's Next Movie Teased at Cannes, Miyazaki Slates Modern Anime
May 22, 2024
MovieWeb
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Napier is quoted from a March 15 The Guardian article in which she commented on whether Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki will return from retirement.

Timothy Hyunsoo Lee maps out Greater Boston with ‘Our Family Portrait’
May 22, 2024
The Boston Globe
Part-time Lecturer Timothy Hyunsoo Lee discusses his Our Family Portrait project, developed as part of the Museum of Fine Arts’ annual Community Arts Initiative. The project is on view through October 27.

Geplunderde ‘kroonjuwelen’ van de Ashanti’s eindelijk terug in Ghana – voor even
May 21, 2024
NRC
Professor and Chair of the Music Department Kwasi Ampene is quoted about Ashanti objects on loan from the British and the Victoria & Albert Museums to Ghana saying, “We are talking about objects that have been looted. The British themselves use that word. So how is it moral to say, 'okay, we looted these objects, but we're lending them to you'?”

Harassment of scientists is surging - institutions aren’t sure how to help
May 20, 2024 
Nature
Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology Sarah Sobieraj is among the experts quoted about the ongoing harassment and abuse of scientists worldwide, noting “The visibility that brings attention to you could come from any number of sources that are not of your own doing.” 

Why Do Humans Sing? Traditional Music in 55 Languages Reveals Patterns and Telling Similarities
May 17, 2024
Smithsonian Magazine
Professor of Psychology Aniruddh Patel is quoted from a New York Times article on research that identified universal features of songs across many cultures. 

Why Do People Make Music?
May 15, 2024 
The New York Times
Professor of Psychology Aniruddh Patel comments on research that identified universal features of songs across many cultures, noting that these features may have a special role in communication that is separate from speech. 

Don’t blame the politicians; blame the voters
May 14, 2024
Baltimore Sun
This opinion piece cites Professor of Political Science Brian Schaffner’s collaborative research on how voter attitudes about racism and sexism influenced the 2016 election.

May 13, 2024 - Kerri Greenidge, the BSO, and LexSeeHer 
May 13, 2024
WGBH
Associate Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge joins this episode of WGBH’s The Culture Show to discuss the 70th anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling by the Supreme Court, which ended legal segregation in education. 

4 Simple Interventions To Reduce Biases Against Women At Work
May 10, 2024
Forbes
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee is quoted about her research showing that when a job seeker sees the number of applicants for a job posting on a large job-posting website, the person is more likely to finish an application, including women looking for jobs dominated by men.

Is Hollywood’s New ‘Magical, Colorblind Past’ a Good Thing? | KQED
May 9, 2024
KQED
Professor of the Practice in the Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Department Emmanuel Parent joins this Forum radio broadcast to discuss the benefits, drawbacks and "uncomfortable truths" related to colorblind and color-conscious casting in recent Hollywood films and TV shows.

Playing with the kids is important work for chimpanzee mothers
May 8, 2024 
The Conversation
Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Biology Zarin Machanda co-authors this piece about her research that shows mother chimpanzees play with their young even in times of food scarcity, underscoring the important role of such behavior for the physical and psychological development of young chimps. 

On its 125th anniversary, W.E.B. Du Bois’ ‘The Philadelphia Negro’ offers lasting lessons on gentrification in Philly’s historically Black neighborhoods
May 3, 2024
The Conversation
Associate Professor of Sociology Freeden Blume Oeur co-authors this piece examining the lasting impact of W.E.B Du Bois’ book The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study, published in 1899.

Is 'cultural Marxism' behind the college protests?
May 3, 2024
Deseret News
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted from a December 2023 Washington Post article about some findings from his collaborative article “The Young American Left and Attitudes About Israel."

From toxic fungus to soy sauce superstar
May 2, 2024
knowablemagazine.org
Associate Professor of Biology Benjamin Wolfe comments on the scent of A. oryzae mold, and his team’s work domesticating the wild mold P. camemberti is referenced.

Q&A: What's behind the potential ban on TikTok?
May 1, 2024 
Tech Xplore
Assistant Professor of Anthropology Nick Seaver discusses the potential TikTok ban and whether fears about the app’s addictiveness are warranted.

The Forum - Feeding the world and the Green Revolution 
April 27, 2024
BBC News
Professor of Economics Douglas Gollin joins BBC’s The Forum to discuss the evolution of farming techniques and technology and the impact on farmers. 

How Abrupt U-Turns Are Defining U.S. Environmental Regulations
New York Times
April 26, 2024
The polarization of politics means that rules are imposed, gutted, and restored with each election. Experts, including Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala, say that’s bad for the economy.

Sending both bombs and bread to Gaza, Biden signs bill amid student protests
April 26, 2024 
CGTN
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh comments on how young people view the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, seeing Palestinians “rising against a White oppressor.”

‘Watching the Constitution Be Rewritten’
April 25, 2024
The New Civil Rights Movement
Professor of the Practice in Political Science Matthew Segal is quoted from his X account about the Supreme Court hearing on Donald Trump’s immunity. 

I migrated to my ancestral homeland in a search for identity
Apr 23, 2024
Aeon Magazine
Associate Professor of Sociology Helen Marrow’s ongoing research on the migration of individuals from the Global North, inspired by lifestyle or economic reasons rather than forced migration due to factors like war or violence, is referenced in this essay.

Racist dog whistle: the right wing has weaponized ‘DEI’
April 21, 2024 
The Guardian    
Lenore Stern Professorship in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo comments on "DEI" becoming part of the conservative attack on egalitarianism, saying “The far right has really taken these ideas to an extreme and are not really worried about seeming racist.” 

Women run 80% of US elections – but are targets of misogyny-laced threats
April 20, 2024
The Guardian
Professor of Sociology Sarah Sobieraj discusses the rise in threats to and harassment of women who run elections the U.S. since 2020 noting, “Even though the abuse and harassment really looks and feels like bullying or interpersonal backlash, it’s really a structural rage that’s based in hostility toward the voice and visibility of these speakers as representatives of groups of people.” 

Finding Comfort in a Haircut
April 13, 2024
The New York Times
Associate Professor in the Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Department Kareem Khubchandani says “When salons decide to be trans- and queer-affirming, I think that makes a lot of difference to people who often don’t feel safe bringing their bodies into public spaces.” 

Harvard reinstates testing requirement for admissions
April 12, 2024
WGBH
Lenore Stern Professorship in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo comments on Harvard’s decision to reinstate its standardized test requirement for new applicants.

The higher price of oil is helping tank the price of natural gas
April 12, 2024
Marketplace
Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala joins this Marketplace segment to comment on why natural gas prices in West Texas have dropped while the price of oil is going up.

Impacts of interdistrict school choice in Boston
April, 10, 2024
The Thomas B. Fordham Institute
This commentary highlights Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren’s new research that demonstrates positive outcomes for students in Boston’s METCO program.

Eitan Hersh explains his Conservative Thought Experiment Class - Chicago's Morning 
April 8, 2024
Chicago's Morning Answer
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh joins Chicago’s Morning Answer to discuss his course on modern American political conservatism.

Bechdel Test a screen gem in raising awareness of women in film
April 7, 2024
The Boston Globe
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Napier pens this letter to the editor in response to a March 31 article on the Bechdel Test, which measures the representation of women in film and other fiction, highlighting two Hayao Miyazaki films “that have fantastic and significant women characters who never talk about men.”

Huge Lowell development project met with optimism and skepticism
April 4, 2024
WGBH
Distinguished Senior Lecturer of Anthropology Cathy Stanton is quoted at length about the creation of the Lowell National Historical Park. She is the author of the 2006 book The Lowell Experiment: Public History in a Postindustrial City.

Most US Jewish parents say kids’ college choices affected by Oct. 7 - survey
April 3, 2024
The Times Of Israel
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted about his new study examining campus antisemitism and perceptions of it since Hamas’ October 7 attack on Israel. 

What you need to know about Louisville’s likely switch to nonpartisan elections
April 3, 2024
Louisville Public Media
Professor of Political Science Brian Schafner is quoted at length about how nonpartisan elections impact voters and candidates, noting it is a system where “politics becomes more driven by the most educated and wealthiest portions of the public.” Schaffner’s 2001 research on the effects of nonpartisan elections on voter decisionmaking is linked.

Most Jewish parents say Oct. 7 has affected their child’s college selection, Hillel survey finds
April 3, 2024
JTA
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted about his new study examining campus antisemitism and perceptions of it since Hamas’ October 7 attack on Israel. 

Are Neurons Required for Cognition and Memory? 
April 1, 2024
Psychology Today
Professor of Biology Michael Levin’s longtime research on planarian flatworm memory and regeneration is highlighted in this blog post.

Sacre bleu! Camembert and brie 'on the verge of extinction,' French scientists warn
March 29, 2024
NBC News
Associate Professor of Biology Benjamin Wolfe explains how the lab-grown version of the penicillium camemberti fungus, an important element of camembert cheesemaking, is impacting the fungus’ ability to reproduce naturally.

In a post-affirmative action world, Harvard admits its first class - discounting race
March 29, 2024
WGBH
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo comments on the known composition of Harvard’s incoming class, the first for which colleges could not consider applicants’ race. Warikoo is the author of the book Is Affirmative Action Fair?

March of ‘terror’: Pakistan grapples with deadly attacks on China interests
March 29, 2024
Al Jazeera
Assistant Professor of Political Science Fahd Humayun explains why he believes that an attack on a Chinese-funded hydropower project in Pakistan near Besham was carried out by either a “TTP affiliate or ISKP” to target the Pakistan-China relationship.

The Joy And Chaos Of Aging As A Drag Queen
March 28, 2024
HuffPost
Associate Professor of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Kareem Khubchandani comments on how expectations for drag queen performances can impact aging artists. Khubchandani is a drag performer and author of Decolonize Drag.

Blood, sweat, and water: New paper analytical devices easily track health and environment
March 28, 2024 
Phys.org
Associate Professor of Chemistry Charlie Mace and Engineering’s Fiorenzo Omenetto and Sameer Sonkusale are quoted about their respective paper-based tests for monitoring personal health and environmental safety that can be used in the home and in the field. Engineering graduate student Elisabetta Ruggeri, who works with Omenetto in the Silklab, is also quoted in this reprinted Tufts Now news story.

New England Conservatory gears up to celebrate a New England composer
March 27, 2024
WGBH
Associate Professor of History Kerri Greenidge joins this episode of WGBH’s The Culture Show to discuss her book, The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family

Chimp moms play 'airplanes' with their kids, even when they're tired and hungry
March 26, 2024
Discover Wildlife
Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Biology Zarin Machanda is quoted about her research that shows mother chimpanzees play with their young even in times of food scarcity, underscoring the important role of such behavior for the physical and psychological development of young chimps.

How one class at Tufts taught liberal students to have an open mind
March 26, 2024
The College Fix
This article highlights the recent Boston Magazine feature on Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh’s course on modern American political conservatism.

Zhidong Zhang plays with balloons
March 25, 2024 
The Boston Globe
SMFA Lecturer Zhidong Zhang is featured in this installment of the Boston Globe’s "Working Artist" profile series.

Chemists forge paths to inaccessible sugars
March 25, 2024
C&EN
Professor of Chemistry Clay Bennett is quoted throughout this article exploring the challenges of synthesizing sugar molecules for research purposes and strategies being employed to speed up and improve this process.

On campus, Jewish and Muslim students fear for their safety
March 22, 2024
The World from PRX
This article cites a survey from Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh examining US college students' experiences being Jewish and supporting Israel on campus before and after Hamas’ October 7, 2023 attack on Israel.

A Boston-based group is trying to track down the names of everyone who was ever enslaved in the U.S.
March 21, 2024
Boston.com
Associate Professors of History Kendra Field and Kerri Greenidge are quoted about the collaborative "10 Million Names" project with American Ancestors. Field is the project's chief historian and Greenidge is on its Scholar’s Council.

On campus, Jewish and Muslim students fear their safety
March 21, 2024
WGBH
This article cites a survey from Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh that found an increase in the number of Jewish college students who felt the need to hide their Jewish identity to fit in following Hamas’ October 7, 2023 attack on Israel.

Europe's Challenge: Avoiding a Repeat 2014-16 Migration Crisis
March 21, 2024
Georgetown Journal of International Affairs
Associate Professor of Political Science Kelly M. Greenhill co-authors this piece examining how Europe needs to enhance cooperation around migration management and border control, now that agreement was reached on a long-stalled asylum pact.

Tufts Prof. Elizabeth Setren on METCO’s Proven Results
March 20, 2024
Pioneer Institute
Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren joins this episode of The Learning Curve podcast to discuss her new research that found Boston students who attended suburban school districts as part of the voluntary racial integration METCO program outperformed their peers in Boston Public Schools on nearly every measure over the last three decades.

How are women faring in American politics?
March 20, 2024
Connecticut Public Radio
Professor of Sociology and Sociology Chair Sarah Sobieraj was on Connecticut Public Radio as part of a panel discussing "how women are faring in American politics." 

Prof. Eitan Hersh answers the $64,000 question: Are Jewish kids safe at US colleges?
March 20, 2024
The Times Of Israel
In this interview, Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh discusses his latest survey examining American Jewish college students' experiences, campus antisemitism, and perceptions of these social tensions before and after Hamas’ October 7, 2023 attack on Israel. 

A Radical Experiment at Tufts 
March 19, 2024
Boston Magazine 
This feature explores Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh's course on modern American political conservatism, following the class throughout the fall semester. Hersh and a number of students are quoted.

Federally-funded study finds Chimp moms play with kids even if short on food
March 19, 2024 
The Center Square
Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Biology Zarin Machanda and former Postdoctoral Associate in the Anthropology Department Kris Sabbi are quoted about their research that shows mother chimpanzees play with their young even in times of food scarcity, underscoring the important role of such behavior for the physical and psychological development of young chimps.

A Radical Experiment at Tufts
March 19, 2024
Boston Magazine
This feature explores Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh’s course on modern American political conservatism, following the class throughout the fall semester. Hersh and a number of students are quoted. 

Diversity: A catalyst for collective advancement
March 18, 2024
The Himalayan Times
Professor of Psychology Samuel Sommers’ 2006 research that explored the role of racial diversity in the jury decision-making process is referenced in this opinion piece.

De kinderen vermaken? Chimpanseemoeders stoppen er nooit mee
March 18, 2024
National Geographic Nederland België
This article highlights new research led by Assistant Professor of Anthropology Zarin Machanda that shows mother chimpanzees play with their young even in times of food scarcity, underscoring the important role of such behavior for the physical and psychological development of young chimps.

Chimpanzee moms play with their kids - even when they're hungry and tired 
March 15, 2024
CBC
Assistant Professor of Anthropology Zarin Machanda joins CBC’s "As It Happens" to discuss research she led that shows mother chimpanzees play with their young even in times of food scarcity, underscoring the important role of such behavior for the physical and psychological development of young chimps.

‘Irreplaceable’: will Hayao Miyazaki, Japan’s animation auteur, ever retire?
March 15, 2024
The Guardian
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Napier comments on whether Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki will return from retirement and how he is irreplaceable as a “genuine auteur.”

Chimp mothers play with their youngsters even when times are tough
March 14, 2024 
New Scientist
Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Biology Zarin Machanda comments on research she led that shows mother chimpanzees play with their young even in times of food scarcity, underscoring the important role of such behavior for the physical and psychological development of young chimps.

Tanzania’s Richest Man Wants To Be Africa’s Biggest Farmer - If Everyone Gets Out Of His Way
March 14, 2024
Forbes
Professor of Economics Margaret McMillan comments on the potential impact that billionaire Mohammed “Mo” Dewji could have on the African economy. 

‘It’s hard to know from anecdotes’. New study tests ‘narrative’ of campus antisemitism
March 12, 2024
The Boston Globe
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted about the first in a series of studies examining campus antisemitism and perceptions of it since Hamas’ October 7 attack on Israel. Recent antisemitic incidents at local colleges, including Tufts, are mentioned. The university’s response is also noted.

Study: Jewish college students feel they must hide support for Israel; their non-Jewish peers agree
March 11, 2024
eJewish Philanthropy
This article highlights new collaborative research from Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh on how college students feel about their Jewish identity as well as on the social stigma associated with supporting Israel.

Fraud and corruption on rise at U.S. utilities, threatening energy transition
March 11, 2024
The Florida Times-Union
Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala comments on the issue of fraud and corruption in the utility sector, saying, “I think because of the importance of climate change, the stakes are much higher.”

N.C. man challenges death sentence through repealed Racial Justice Act
March 10, 2024
Spectrum News
Professor of Psychology Samuel Sommers was among the experts who testified at a North Carolina hearing looking into discrimination in jury selection.

Not All Bees Have a Queen. Two Bug Experts Explain Why.
March 10, 2024
Inverse 
As part of the Curious Kids series, Associate Professor of Biology Phil Starks co-authors this piece explaining the role of the queen in different bee species. 

Will brie and Camembert cheeses go extinct? Here’s what scientists say.
March 9, 2024
The Washington Post
Associate Professor of Biology Benjamin Wolfe explains the crucial role of the Penicillium camemberti fungus in the development of camembert and brie cheeses. The Wolfe Lab’s ongoing research domesticating wild mold for use in cheesemaking is also linked.

Xi Sticks to His Vision for China’s Rise Even as Growth Slows
March 9, 2024
The New York Times
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley comments on China’s focus on the manufacturing and technology industries to help boost its slowing economy. Beckley’s 2023 International Security article on the implications of China’s peaking power is linked.

A local organization is tracing the lineage of enslaved Americans to their present-day ancestors
March 9, 2024
WGBH
Associate Professor of History Kendra Field joins WGBH’s Under the Radar to discuss the 10 Million Names project, of which she is chief historian. 

China’s ‘two sessions’ 2024: as GDP gap with US widens, will the ‘East wind’ prevail?
March 5, 2024
South China Morning Post
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley is noted for coining the term “peak China,” indicating China’s waning economic power. 

Why do bees have queens? 2 biologists explain this insect’s social structure – and why some bees don’t have a queen at all
March 4, 2024
MSN
As part of the Curious Kids series, Associate Professor of Biology Phil Starks co-authors this piece explaining the role of the queen in different bee species. 

Historic Racial Justice Act hearing continues in Johnston County with first-of-its-kind evidence
March 4, 2024 
CBS 17
Professor of Psychology Sam Sommers is quoted from his testimony at a North Carolina court hearing where the defendant alleges that race heavily influenced his death sentence. 

Why do bees have queens? 2 biologists explain this insect’s social structure – and why some bees don’t have a queen at all
March 4, 2024
The Conversation
As part of the Curious Kids series, Associate Professor of Biology Phil Starks co-authors this piece explaining the role of the queen in different bee species.

Necromancy at SoEx: 'Moving Clouds' summons the once-thought-dead
March 3, 2024
48 Hills
SMFA Professor of the Practice Cathy Lu discusses the exhibition Moving Clouds, which she curated at San Francisco's Southern Exposure art space.

A Home on Mars, The First Home Scheme & Outdoor Saunas
March 2, 2024
News Talk
Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Justin Hollander, A’96, was interviewed about his recent research on Mars on the Irish national talk radio station Newstalk.

Utility Fraud and Corruption Are Threatening the Clean Energy Transition
March 1, 2024
Mother Jones
Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala comments on the issue of fraud and corruption in the utility sector, saying, “I think because of the importance of climate change, the stakes are much higher.”

Rare audio of formerly enslaved people connects history to the present
February 29, 2024
ABC News
Associate Professor of History Kendra Field, chief historian for the 10 Million Names project, appears in this news segment to discuss audiotape interviews with formerly enslaved individuals that are being used for research on enslaved people.

Meet the artist painting with porcupine quills and living in a sausage factory
February 29, 2024
WGBH
Associate Professor of History Kerri Greenidge joins this episode of The Culture Show to discuss how historic African American sites for the African American Trail Project, of which she is co-director, were mapped.

Matching Psychology Training to Job Market Realities
February 27, 2024
Psychological Science
Professor of Psychology Holly Taylor shares techniques for improving psychology graduate coursework to better accommodate diverse careers noting, “it’s not the courses that differ between our students who successfully move into industry and those who don’t. It’s the framing of ideas within the courses.”

Are standardized tests making a comeback in higher education?
February 26, 2024
WBUR
Professor of Sociology Natasha Warikoo joins this Radio Boston discussion about why some universities are bringing back requirements for the SAT and ACT for college applications.

Q&A: How misinformation and disinformation spread, the role of AI, and how we can guard against them
February 26, 2024
Phys.org
Associate Professor of Political Science Kelly Greenhill explains different types of non-truthful information, their role in American politics, and discusses concerns about AI-generated content. 

Chieppo & Gass: Perks only for the ‘right’ kind of public schools
February 26, 2024
Boston Herald
This opinion piece cites data from Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren’s new research that found Boston students who attended suburban school districts as part of the voluntary racial integration METCO program outperformed their peers in Boston Public Schools on nearly every measure over the last three decades.

Roots Recovered: Reclaiming Our Names
February 23, 2024
13 NEWS NOW
Associate Professor of History Kendra Field and Associate Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge appear in this 13NewsNow documentary, Roots Recovered: Reclaiming Our Names, and are quoted in the accompanying article. The documentary highlights the collaborative 10 Million Names Project, of which Field is chief historian. An extended video interview with Field is also included. (Greenidge first appears at 15:45 and Field at 16:35.)

El período colonial de América Latina fue mucho menos católico de lo que parece
February 23, 2024
historia.nationalgeographic.com.es
In this translated The Conversation reprint, Assistant Professor of History Diego Javier Luis examines the spiritual life of colonial Latin America, where Spanish control “was far from absolute.”

Rethinking ancient Rome and its colonies in Africa
February 22, 2024
Phys.org
Professor of Classical Studies Bruce Hitchner is quoted about his work confronting the colonial legacy of archaeology in North Africa. Hitchner recently presented the talk “Decolonizing the History of North Africa in Antiquity.”

Ukraine at the Crossroads, with Maria Popova & Oxana Shevel
February 22, 2024
NGO Watch
Associate Professor of Political Science Oxana Shevel joins this The Doorstop podcast episode to discuss shifting Ukraine-Russia war narratives and expectations. 

Analysis of research grants pipeline illustrates systematic disadvantages
February 21, 2024
Medical Xpress
Assistant Professor of Biology Sarah Hengel was part of a collaborative analysis that showed of the more than 3,000 extramural National Institutes of Health K99 awards granted between 2008 and 2021, none were to an investigator at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU). 

Human cells used to create biological robot
February 20, 2024
ASME
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya are quoted about their collaborative research to create Anthrobots, multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue.

Inside The Fowler Museum's Decision To Return Historical Artifacts To The Asante Kingdom
February 18, 2024
LAist
Chair of the Music Department Kwasi Ampene worked as an intermediary to return looted objects from the UCLA Fowler Museum to Ghana’s Asante King Otumfuo Osei Tutu II.

A Physicist Tries to Avoid the Fact of Design in Our Universe…
February 18, 2024
mindmatters.ai
Professor of Physics & Astronomy Alexander Vilenkin's conversation with Robert Lawrence Kuhn from Closer to Truth discussing his theory regarding multiple universes is featured in this article.

Study finds Massachusetts school desegregation program benefits K-12 students
February 15, 2024
Phys.org
Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren is quoted about her new research that found Boston students who attended suburban school districts as part of the voluntary racial integration METCO program outperformed their peers in Boston Public Schools on nearly every measure over the last three decades. 

Trump’s NATO Threat Reflects a Wider Shift on America’s Place in the World
February 15, 2024
The New York Times
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley is quoted in this article examining current American views of international partnerships, noting, “The alliance structure was built to win the Cold War and it’s sort of atrophied.”

Podcast with Diego Javier Luis, author of “The First Asians in the Americas: A Transpacific History”
February 15, 2024
asianreviewofbooks.com
Assistant Professor of History Diego Javier Luis joins this podcast episode to discuss his new book, The First Asians in the Americas: A Transpacific History.

How Anti-Army Vote May Deliver An Unstable Pak Government
February 15, 2024
NDTV
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts and Sciences Ayesha Jalal discusses the aftermath of Pakistan's general election and what the next government may look like.

'10 Million Names' | African Americans working to recover the names of their ancestors
February 14, 2024
13 NEWS NOW
Associate Professors of History Kendra Field and Kerri Greenidge appear in this video segment previewing the documentary Roots Recovered: Reclaiming Our Names, which will air on 13NewsNow on February 23. The documentary highlights the collaborative 10 Million Names Project, of which Field is chief historian.

5 Urban Planning Ideas for How to Settle Mars
February 14, 2024
Planetizen
Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Justin Hollander shares ideas for building on Mars, the topic of his 2023 book The First City on Mars: An Urban Planner’s Guide to Settling the Red Planet.

Pakistan's election was supposed to end deadlock. It failed
February 13, 2024
Nikkei Asia
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts and Sciences Ayesha Jalal discusses the aftermath of Pakistan's general election and the future of democracy in the country.

Not just ‘Star Wars’: John Williams’ scores includes jazz, bluegrass, English Gothic
February 13, 2024
KCRW
Associate Professor of Music Frank Lehman joins Press Play to discuss some of composer John Williams lesser known film scores. Lehman is the author of Hollywood Harmony: Musical Wonder and the Sound of Cinema.

Gaza war frays Egypt-Israel pact
February 13, 2024
The World from PRX
Professor of History Khaled Fahmy joins PRI’s The World to discuss increased calls by Egyptian citizens to end diplomatic relations with Israel, threatening a 40-year-old peace treaty between the countries, if the Israeli military moves into the Egyptian border city of Rafah, located in the southern Gaza Strip. 

Analysis: Pakistan’s youth deliver stinging rebuke to military elite by backing jailed leader Khan
February 12, 2024
CNN
Assistant Professor of Political Science Fahd Humayun says “While public confidence in the country’s institutions has clearly fluctuated in the past few years, these elections, for all their flaws, have proven that there was considerable political mobilization around the issue of representation, and that should inspire hope for Pakistan’s future.”

Inside Oscar winner John Williams’ jazz, bluegrass scores
February 12, 2024
Press Play with Madeleine Brand
This year, John Williams’ score for Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny earned him his 54th Oscar nomination. Associate Professor of Music Frank Lehman joins the Press Play podcast to discuss Williams' seven-decade career and says some of Williams’ best works are smaller scale and grab less attention from the Academy. 

Pakistan’s post-election crisis – how anti-army vote may deliver an unstable government that falls into the military’s hands
February 11, 2024
The Conversation
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts and Sciences Ayesha Jalal discusses the aftermath of Pakistan's general election and what the next government may look like.

I have brought back the spirit and soul of Asanteman – Otumfuo
February 9, 2024
GhanaWeb
This article shares remarks from Professor of Music and Department Chair Kwasi Ampene at the unveiling of looted objects returned from the Fowler Museum to Ghana’s Asantehene Osei Tutu II. Ampene is a member of the delegation that facilitated the return.

Ayesha Jalal writes | Pakistan votes: Here’s what’s at stake in the elections
February 8, 2024
Indian Express
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts and Sciences Ayesha Jalal examines why Pakistan’s elections “are extremely important in determining Pakistan’s immediate and future trajectory.”

5 things to do this weekend, including ice sculptures in Salem and a science fest in Cambridge
February 8, 2024
WBUR
This overview of notable Boston-area events includes the February 11 screening of Malcom X at which Associate Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge will lead a discussion. The event is part of the Museum of African American History’s Black History Month film series.

What Is the Essence of Life?
February 8, 2024
Evolution News
Professor of Biology Michael Levin is quoted from a Big Think video in which he discusses cellular intelligence.

Rigged or not, polls the only option for Pakistan
February 6, 2024
The Times of India
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts and Sciences Ayesha Jalal discusses Pakistan’s upcoming February 8 general election in this in-depth interview.

In wealthy, educated communities, evidence emerges of a new form of "white flight"
February 6, 2024
stacker.com
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo’s 2022 book, Race at the Top: Asian Americans and Whites in Pursuit of the American Dream in Suburban Schools, is referenced in this The 74 reprint, which appears in 24 additional outlets.

Larry Bell: New Piano Music
February 6, 2024
The Boston Musical Intelligencer
Professor Emeritus Mark DeVoto reviews a recent Berklee College concert featuring four pianists, including Professor of Music John McDonald, playing pieces composer Larry Bell wrote specifically for each musician.

What to read about Pakistan
February 6, 2024
The Economist
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts and Sciences Ayesha Jalal’s book The Sole Spokesman: Jinnah, the Muslim League and the Demand for Pakistan is featured in this collection of essential reads on Pakistan. 

Rigged or Not, Polls Are the Only Option for Pakistan
February 5, 2024
The Wire
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts and Sciences Ayesha Jalal discusses Pakistan’s upcoming February 8 general election in this in-depth interview. 

In a highly unusual move, UCLA Fowler Museum is initiating returns of looted African works
February 5, 2024
Los Angeles Times
Professor of Music and Chair of the Music Department Kwasi Ampene is among the delegation that will be returning looted objects from the UCLA Fowler Museum to Ghana’s Asante King Otumfuo Osei Tutu II. Ampene also worked with the Fowler to commission replicas of these objects created by Ghanaian artists. 

How Primed for War Is China?
February 4, 2024
Foreign Policy
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley co-authors this essay examining the factors that indicate China may be on a path toward using military force, against Taiwan or another target in the Western Pacific.

First batch of looted objects land in Ghana
February 3, 2024
Modern Ghana
Professor of Music and Chair of the Music Department Kwasi Ampene is among the delegation that will be returning looted objects from the Fowler Museum to Ghana’s Asantehene Osei Tutu II.

Sex and Poison May Explain California Death Cap Invasion
February 1, 2024
Bay Nature
This article cites research by Associate Professor of Biology Benjamin Wolfe involving death cap mushrooms at California’s Point Reyes National Seashore.

J.D. Tuccille: Over-educated urban elites think Americans have too much freedom
January 31, 2024
National Post
This opinion column references a 2023 paper co-authored by Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh, “The Partisan Realignment of American Business,” which found that corporate America is shifting away from its traditional alliance with the Republican Party.

How can macroeconomics (and macroeconomists) contribute to what we know about development policy? 
January 31, 2024
VoxDevTalks
The availability of better data has given fresh impetus to the use of macroeconomic models to explain the development process in LICs. In this episode of VoxDevTalks, Professor of Economics Douglas Gollin talks to Host Tim Phillips about this emerging agenda.

Thinking Global Podcast – Maria Popova and Oxana Shevel
January 29, 2024
E-International Relations
Associate Professor of Political Science Oxana Shevel, alongside McGill University’s Maria Popova, joins this episode of E-International Relations’ Thinking Global podcast to discuss their new book, Russia and Ukraine: Entangled Histories, Diverging States.

Background Briefing: January 28, 2024
January 29, 2024
www.backgroundbriefing.org
Associate Professor of Political Science Oxana Shevel, alongside McGill University’s Maria Popova, joins this episode of Background Briefing with Ian Masters to discuss the second anniversary of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. They are coauthors of the book Russia and Ukraine: Entangled Histories, Diverging States.

Boston museum teams up with Showcase Cinemas for Black History Month
January 28, 2024
The Business Journals
Associate Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge will lead a discussion at one of the Museum of African American History’s Black History Month film screening series. Greenidge is a Museum historian-in-residence. 

Tufts study: METCO’s a program that works!
January 25, 2024
Dorchester Reporter
The author, president and CEO of METCO, highlights research from Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren that found the program “has a large, positive effect on METCO students’ educational achievements and careers.”

Tufts study shows METCO participation boosts college attendance, graduation
January 25, 2024
Bay State Banner
This article highlighting research from Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren on the METCO program quotes several adult alumni who lived in Boston and graduated from a participating suburban district.

Boston names its Reparations Task Force research teams
January 24, 2024
NBC Boston
Associate Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge and Associate Professor of History Kendra Field have been selected as members of the research team that will study Boston’s role in the transatlantic slave trade from 1620 to 1940, as part of the Boston Reparations Task Force’s work toward addressing the city’s historical involvement in slavery.

What is time? An astronomer explains the search to find its origins
January 24, 2024
MSN
Professor of Physics & Astronomy Alexander Vilenkin’s work on the eternal inflation theory of the universe is highlighted in this reprinted 2022 Astronomy article.

China expected to step up coercion, provocations after Taiwan election rebuke
January 23, 2024
The Washington Times
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley is quoted from his recent New York Times op-ed saying, “Determined to maintain their autonomy, the people of Taiwan are drifting farther from China and won’t come back voluntarily, elevating military action as one of the only options left for China to effect the unification with Taiwan that it has long sought.”

Adventures in Philosophy with Daniel Dennett and Richard Dawkins
January 22, 2024
Player FM
A&S Professor Emeritus Daniel Dennett joins this Intelligence Squared podcast episode to discuss philosophy, science, and their intersections with British scientist and writer Richard Dawkins. 

Latin America’s colonial period was less Catholic
January 22, 2024 
Patheos
In this The Conversation reprint, Assistant Professor of History Diego Javier Luis examines the spiritual life of colonial Latin America, where Spanish control “was far from absolute.” 

After Affirmative Action Ban, They Rewrote College Essays With a Key Theme: Race
January 20, 2024
The New York Times
Lenore Stern Professorship in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo discusses how the Supreme Court’s ruling striking down affirmative action in college admissions is impacting applicants' essay topics, saying that the Court is “expecting that a story of adversity is going to play the role that race played when we had race-conscious admissions.” 

Latin America’s colonial period was far less Catholic than it might seem − despite the Inquisition’s attempts to police religion
January 19, 2024
The Conversation
Assistant Professor of History Diego Javier Luis examines the spiritual life of colonial Latin America, where Spanish control “was far from absolute.”

Is function more important than emotion? Let's build more fun buildings, Heatherwick suggests
January 18, 2024
Forbes
Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Justin Hollander, A’96, and his book Cognitive Architecture were mentioned in an article in Forbes Magazine on creating innovative buildings.

Synthetic biology aims to tackle disease and give cells superpowers
January 18, 2024
Science News Explores
This article links to a 2022 Lex Friedman Podcast video interview with Vannevar Bush Professorship of Biology Michael Levin, in a wide-ranging conversation that covers aliens, evolution, embryogenesis, and xenobots.

A new study highlights the long-term benefits of METCO participation
January 17, 2024
WBUR
Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren discusses her new research examining the long-term effects of the METCO program, which sends Boston students to learn in suburban school districts, finding a range of “remarkable long-term advantages” for participants compared to those who were not accepted into the program.

A Peaceful Solution on Taiwan Is Slipping Away
January 17, 2024
The New York Times
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley shares why he believes Taiwan’s continued advocacy for its independence from China is dampening the possibilities for peaceful unification and increasing the likelihood of conflict.

A new study highlights the long-term benefits of METCO participation
January 16, 2024
WBUR
Assistant Professor of Economics Elizabeth Setren led a new study, which sheds light on the long-term effects of the popular METCO program, which sends thousands of Boston students to learn in suburban school districts each year.

Brains Are Not Required When It Comes to Thinking and Solving Problems--Simple Cells Can Do It
January 16, 2024
Scientific American
Vannevar Bush Professorship of Biology Michael Levin discusses his collaborative xenobots and anthrobots research and how these innovations can contribute to rethinking the way cognition plays out in the real world. 

In Gaza, Israel has turned water into a weapon of mass destruction
January 16, 2024
972 Magazine
Associate Professor of Anthropology Amahl Bishara coauthors this piece examining the dangerous ramifications of Israel’s “weaponization of water” in its latest military offensive in Gaza.

TikTok 'Sludge' Trend: What Parents Need To Know
January 16, 2024
Movieguide
Assistant Professor of Anthropology Nick Seaver does not have concerns about “sludge” videos, the latest TikTok trend, saying “I don’t think it’s very useful to point to, like, any new media and be, like, see, ‘This is evidence that we’re falling.’”

Campaigning Starts In Pakistan's Delayed National Polls
January 15, 2024
Barron's
Mary Richardson Professor of History, Arts, and Sciences Ayesha Jalal says that Pakistan’s delayed national election is “going to be a controversial election: one party sees it as a complete negation of democracy." 

Who Will Rid Us of This Cursed Plane?
January 13, 2024
New York Magazine
Professor of Economics Silke Forbes comments on the lack of incentives for airlines to switch an existing airplane model for another. 

Catholic universities need a new kind of affirmative action-for student aligned with their mission
January 12, 2024
America - The Jesuit Review
Lenore Stern Professorship in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo comments on a college admissions process that considers how students might contribute to a school’s mission. 

Thousands of U.S. Cities Could Become Virtual Ghost Towns by 2100
January 11, 2024
Scientific American
Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning Justin Hollander, A’96, was interviewed and quoted in an article in Scientific American on how thousands of US cities could become virtual ghost towns by 2100.

Looking back on a year of The Embrace
January 10, 2024
WGBH
Ahead of its first anniversary, Associate Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge joins The Culture Show to discuss "The Embrace," Boston’s sculpture honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King and the role of public art and memorials in communities.

Biological robots: a new therapeutic tool
January 9, 2024 
drugtargetreview.com
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya are quoted about their collaborative research to create Anthrobots, multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue. Levin’s collaborative xenobot work is also mentioned.

From Slave To Spiritual Icon, One Woman’s Life A Snapshot Of Spain’s Colonization
January 9, 2024
The Freethinker Post
Assistant Professor of History Diego Luis shares the story of Catarina de San Juan, who became one of the first Asians in the Americas after she was captured as part of the transpacific slave trade. 

From South Asia to Mexico, from slave to spiritual icon, this woman's life is a snapshot of Spain's colonization – and the Pacific slave trade history that books often leave out
January 8, 2024 
The Conversation
Assistant Professor of History Diego Luis shares the story of Catarina de San Juan, who became one of the first Asians in the Americas after she was captured as part of the transpacific slave trade.

Episode 61: The Weaponization of Migration
January 5, 2024
Player FM
Associate Professor of Political Science Kelly Greenhill joins this episode of the Global in the Granite State podcast, from the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire, to examine what weaponized migration is and how targeted states and communities might respond to this coercive tactic. Gallagher is the author of Weapons of Mass Migration: Forced Displacement, Coercion, and Foreign Policy.

The United States and China are Locked in a New Cold War: A Debate with Dr. Michael Beckley and Dr. Arne Westad
January 3, 2024 
chinapower.csis.org
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley joins the ChinaPower podcast to debate the proposition that the United States and China “are locked in a new cold war.”

3 academic experts question O’Brien’s comments
January 2, 2024
CommonWealth Beacon
Lenore Stern Professorship in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo comments on allegations of racial insensitivity made against suspended Cannabis Control Commission Chair Shannon O’Brien.

Today’s at-home microbiome testing industry is fraught with snake oil
January 2, 2024
STAT
A 2022 reprinted The Conversation article by Associate Professor of Biology Benjamin Wolfe, discussing what he learned from using personal gut microbiome testing kits, is linked.

Fall 2023

Democracy’s grand test. More than a billion people will head to the polls in South Asia in 2024
December 31, 2023
CNN
Assistant Professor of Political Science Fahd Humayun comments on the political and economic uncertainty in Pakistan ahead of its crucial 2024 elections, noting “any government coming to power through suspicious elections is not only likely to be on a weak footing and reliant on the military for its political survival but will also be unlikely to attract the capital inflows so badly needed." 

AI-generated “counterfeit people” are worrying Daniel Dennett
December 27, 2023 
The Economist
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett joins this Babbage podcast episode to explore the coming clash of artificial and human intelligences.

Yup, There Are A Total Of *Seven* Greek Words For Love-Here's What They Mean
December 25, 2023
Women's Health
Associate Professor of Classical Studies Marie-Claire Beaulieu is quoted throughout this article examining the origins of the ancient Greeks’ seven words for love. 

Gaza’s journalists: ‘Targets’ or ‘casualties’ of Israel’s war?
December 23, 2023
Al Jazeera
Associate Professor of Anthropology Amahl Bishara joins this The Listening Post segment to discuss the experience of Gaza journalists. 

When Philosophers Become Therapists
December 23, 2023
The New Yorker
Lecturer of Philosophy Lydia Amir is highlighted as a practitioner of philosophical counseling.

8 Stunning New Images From Neuroscience
December 22, 2023
The New York Times
Two images of Anthrobots, collaboratively created by Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya, are included in this interactive gallery of images from new neuroscience research.

MicroMachines: Advances In Biorobotic Regenerative Medicine
Decber 22, 2023
Forbes
This article highlights collaborative research from Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya to create Anthrobots, focusing on how these multicellular robots might impact the future of medicine. 

Why younger Americans are more likely to support Palestinians than Israelis
December 22, 2023
The Washington Post
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted about some findings from his collaborative article “The Young American Left and Attitudes About Israel.”

How to keep dual-language programs from being gentrified by English speaking families
December 19, 2023
Hechinger Report
Distinguished Senior Lecturer of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Penn Loh is quoted about his family’s experience at Amigos School, a Cambridge-based dual-language school, and how changes to its admissions processes drastically impacted its population saying, “The pool of Spanish-proficient applicants became more unbalanced, with more wealthy, privileged families having children qualify in this pool.” 

Could "Anthrobots" be the Future of Regenerative Medicine? Tufts Researchers Say Yes
December 16, 2023
WBZ Radio
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya talk about what the future holds for Anthrobots – tiny automatons made of human cells that may heal tissue.

McKee faces defining moment in R.I. bridge crisis
December 15, 2023
The Boston Globe
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh comments throughout this article on Rhode Island Governor Daniel J. McKee’s handling of the closure of the westbound lanes of the heavily traveled Washington Bridge.

Tiny 'Robots' Made From Human Cells Show Wound-Healing Potential
December 15, 2023
smithsonian.com
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya are quoted about their collaborative research to create "anthrobots," multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue. 

Renewables like solar, wind will soon overtake coal, EIA says
December 14, 2023 
Marketplace
Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala comments in this radio segment examining the market advantages that the renewable energy sector has over coal. 

Jerry Rice, Lance Armstrong were the best: Why did they cheat?
December 13, 2023 
USA TODAY
Professor of Psychology Sam Sommers is quoted throughout this article on why some elite athletes cheat, noting “They feel the pressure to be even greater than they already are." Sommers is the author of This is Your Brain on Sports.

Tiny biobots surprise their creators by healing wound
December 13, 2023 
freethink.com
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya are quoted about their collaborative research creating "Anthrobots" - multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue. Tufts’ past xenobot research is also mentioned.

Robots made of your own cells to repair your body
December 11, 2023
Daily Mail Online
Professor of Biology Michael Levin is quoted about his collaborative research creating "anthrobots" - multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue. 

Authors Oxana Shevel and Maria Popova Write the History of Ukraine-Russia Relations
December 10, 2023
The Moscow Times
This is a book review and excerpt of Russia and Ukraine: Entangled Histories, Diverging States, co-authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Oxana Shevel.

Why your brain finds Spotify Wrapped so irresistible
December 8, 2023
NPR
Assistant Professor of Anthropology Nick Seaver joins this Morning Edition segment to discuss why people enjoy receiving and sharing feedback from Spotify Wrapped, which provides users with customized infographics about their listening habits over the past year. Seaver is the author of Computing Taste: Algorithms and the Makers of Music Recommendation.

'The Holdovers,' hardcovers, and history
December 8, 2023
WGBH
Associate Professor in the Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Department Kerri Greenidge joins the third segment of this The Culture Show episode to discuss the life and legacy of Phillis Wheatley, an enslaved person who became one of the best known poets in 18th century America. Greenidge is the author of The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family.

How America Met Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli
December 8, 2023
The Ringer
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Napier comments on factors that contributed to the eventual success of movies from Hayao Miyazaki‘s Studio Ghibli in the United States.

Legal experts express concern over Trump’s comments about not being a dictator except for ‘day one’
December 7, 2023
The Boston Globe
Professor Emeritus of Political Science Jeffrey Berry shares his take on Donald Trump’s comments during a recent televised Fox News town hall.

These astonishing biobots can help neurons regrow - but researchers have no idea how
Dec 6, 2023
Yahoo
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya are quoted in this LiveScience reprint about their collaborative research to create Anthrobots, multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue.

Biological robots made from human cells can help repair damaged tissue
December 6, 2023
LiveScience.com
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya are quoted about their collaborative research to create Anthrobots, multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue.

Mother of Allentown boy waiting for heart transplant speaks out
December 5, 2023 
WFMZ-TV
Associate Professor of Community Health Keren Ladin is quoted about her research examining the relationship between organ transplant outcomes and social support structures, a factor in determining transplant eligibility, noting that “[social support] requirements at transplant centers are not evidence-based, and they're very, very high, and they do disproportionately disadvantage people of color, people who are lower income.”

Evolution, AI, and Consciousness
December 4, 2023 
Psychology Today
In this fourth installment of an interview centered on his new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett discusses philosophical theories of consciousness and evolution. 

Robots Made from Human Cells Can Move on Their Own and Heal Wounds
December 1, 2023
Scientific American
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya are quoted about their collaborative research to create Anthrobots, multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue. 

Scientists create tiny living robots from human cells
December 1, 2023
CNN
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and PhD student Gizem Gumuskaya conducted collaborative research to create Anthrobots, multicellular, self-assembling robots from human tracheal cells that may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue. 

A Theory Of Wealth Inequality Is The Flip Of A Coin
December 1, 2023
Forbes
This article highlights a new paper from Professors of Mathematics Bruce Boghosian and Christoph Börgers in which their model shows that in perfectly even conditions, wealth inequality would develop due to luck rather than by choices made. 

Spotify Doesn't Know Who You Are
December 1, 2023
The Atlantic
Assistant Professor of Anthropology Nick Seaver comments on how consumers have learned to adjust their actions on media platforms to get the content they want. Seaver is the author of Computing Taste: Algorithms and the Makers of Music Recommendation.

What Is Good Philosophy?
Nov 30, 2023 
Psychology Today
In this third and final part of an interview centered on his new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett discusses his approach to philosophy and philosophy historians' role. 

Tiny living robots made from human cells surprise scientists
November 30, 2023
CNN
This article describes Professor of Biology Michael Levin's research on tiny living robots made from human cells that can move around in a lab dish and may be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue.

Meet ‘anthrobots,’ tiny bio-machines built from human tracheal cells
November 30, 2023 
Popular Science
Professor of Biology Michael Levin's research on “anthrobots” — biological machines derived from human tracheal cells is described in this article.

Scientists build tiny bio-robots from human cells to repair neurons
November 30, 2023
MSN
This Daily Mail reprint outlines research by Professor of Biology Michael Levin on microscopic bots that have repaired damaged nerve tissue and may one day help people with serious health conditions.

Tiny robots made from human cells heal damaged tissue
Nature
November 30, 2023
Professor of Biology Michael Levin's research on how tiny robots made of human cells or "anthrobots" can repair a scratch in a layer of neurons in a lab setting.
 
Tiny ‘anthrobots’ built from human cells could help heal the body
November 30, 2023
Science
This article explores Professor of Biology Michael Levin's research on how tiny robots made of human cells can repair nerve tissue in a lab and one day could ferret out disease or deliver drugs.

Human Cell “Biobots” Encourage Neuron Regrowth in Lab Dishes
November 30, 2023
Technology Networks
Professor of Biology Michael Levin's research on "anthrobots" is described in this article. Anthrobots can encourage the regrowth of "wounds" created in plated human neurons in the lab and could one day lead to the development of patient-derived therapeutic “biobots."

These 'anthrobots' created from human cells are healing neurons 
November 30, 2023
Interesting Engineering
This article describes Professor of Biology Michael Levin's exciting new research on the potential of cells to cooperate and communicate in the body and how they can be reprogrammed to create new structures and functions.

Scientists create microscopic ROBOTS made from human cells that repair neurons - opening the door to future Alzheimer's treatment
November 30, 2023
Daily Mail
Professor of Biology Michael Levin's research on microscopic bots that can repair damaged nerve tissue is covered in this article.

Tiny living robots made from human cells surprise scientists
November 30, 2023
Albany Herald
Professor of Biology Michael Levin and a team of researchers "have created tiny living robots from human cells that can move around in a lab dish and may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue."

Scientists develop biobots from human cells to repair damaged neurons
November 30, 2023
Albany Herald
A new study led by Professor of Biology Michael Levin suggests that multicellular robots comprised of human cells can potentially treat patients with damaged neurons.

Video and Transcript: Scientists create tiny biological robot "healers" assembled from human cells
November 30, 2023
Newswise
In a live event, Professor of Biology Michael Levin, Graduate Student Researcher at Michael Levin Laboratory Gizem Gumuskaya, and Associate Director of Public Relations Mike Silver discuss tiny biological robot "healers" assembled from human cells.

Fear of Competition? Research Shows That When Asian Students Move In, White Families Move Out
November 29, 2023
The 74
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo’s 2022 book, Race at the Top: Asian Americans and Whites in Pursuit of the American Dream in Suburban Schools, is referenced in this article, which appears in two additional outlets, including Yahoo.

Chess and Philosophy
November 29, 2023 
Psychology Today
In this second part of an interview centered on his new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett discusses what makes an activity worthwhile.

Greek Mythology in the Garden
November 28, 2023
The Academic Minute
As the leaves fall, Associate Professor of Classical Studies Marie-Claire Beaulieu talks with the Academic Minute podcast about how representations and uses of certain plants tie to Greek myth.

“You are the best you the world will ever see!”
November 28, 2023 
Renton Reporter
A 2018 The Conversation piece by Senior Lecturer Julie Dobrow, Associate Professor Calvin Gidney, and Professor of the Practice Jennifer Burton discussing their research that suggests that "children need a diverse universe of media images” is quoted in this article.

An Interview with Daniel Dennett
November 28, 2023 
Psychology Today
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett discusses his new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking.

Greek mythology in the garden: Academic Minute
November 28, 2023
Inside Higher Ed
Associate Professor of Classical Studies Marie-Claire Beaulieu joins Inside Higher Ed’s podcast Academic Minute to discuss how Greek mythology expresses how human life is part of the universal cycle of nature.

Bruce Boghosian Returns for a Second Term as AUA President
November 27, 2023
The Armenian Mirror-Spectator
Professor of Mathematics Bruce Boghosian, who is on academic leave, discusses plans for his second term as president of the American University of Armenia (AUA).

Biden’s paradox: Can a green grid coexist with industrial surge?
November 27, 2023
E&E News
Associate Professor of Economics Steve Cicala comments on the challenge of expanding the “green grid” to include zero-carbon resources while the utilities industry grows to meet rising electricity demands, noting skepticism of “utilities’ claims about how much capacity they need to build because they’ve never not wanted to build capacity.”

The Ceramists Putting a Fresh Spin on Traditional Korean Techniques
November 27, 2023
The New York Times
Alumna and SMFA Professor of the Practice Jennie Jieun Lee is highlighted among a group of U.S.-based women artists of Korean descent who are creating experimental ceramics that reflect traditions and aesthetics of both cultures.

What survey data reveal about antisemitism in America
November 23, 2023
The Economist
This article references “The Young American Left and Attitudes About Israel,” a 2022 article co-authored by Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh.

How an opera about Harpo Marx introducing Marmite modernist composer Arnold Schoenberg to Hollywood producer Irving Thalberg went down in Shenzhen, China
November 23, 2023
South China Morning Post
Professor of Music Joseph Auner comments on a Chinese staging of Tod Machover’s Schoenberg in Hollywood, an opera for which he wrote the original program preface.

Wealth Inequality the Result of Pure Randomness, Tufts University Study Suggests
November 21, 2023
CFO
This article highlights a paper from Professors of Mathematics Bruce Boghosian and Christoph Börgers in which their model suggests that pure randomness causes the rich to always get richer and the poor to always get poorer — with a concentration of extreme wealth at the top. 

Wealth Inequality Is The Result Of Pure Randomness
November 21, 2023
California Business Journal
Professors of Mathematics Bruce Boghosian and Christoph Börgers's research is described in this article, finding that wealth inequality is the result of chance. 

Wealth inequality is result of ‘pure randomness’: Study
November 21, 2023
Investment News
This article describes a recent study from Professors of Mathematics Bruce Boghosian and Christoph Börgers that finds that "when people are more wealthy, it’s because they’re lucky — a result of just pure randomness."

Four Months After the Supreme Court Ruled Against the Use of Race in Admissions
November 19, 2023
Sampan
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo and Dean of Admissions Joseph Duck are quoted in this article on how the admissions process has impacted Boston-area colleges following the Supreme Court ruling against the use of race in admissions.

Don’t be fooled by Biden and Xi talks − China and the US are enduring rivals rather than engaged partners
November 17, 2023
The Conversation 
Despite the positive optics of last week’s meeting between President Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping, Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley examines why the “enduring rivalry” between the two nations is likely to remain.

Q&A: Schools are more likely to call mothers than fathers, which has implications for the careers of working parents
November 16, 2023
Phys.org
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee discusses the implications of her collaborative study that found mothers are 1.4 times more likely than fathers to be contacted by school officials when the choice of who to call appears neutral. 

Biden-Xi meeting: 6 essential reads on what to look out for as US, Chinese leaders hold face-to-face talks
November 14, 2023
The Conversation
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley’s March 2023 Conversation analysis of the inaugural hearing of the U.S. House's Select Committee addressing the perceived growing threat of China is included in this round-up of articles providing helpful context and insights into the forthcoming meeting between President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping. 

Images Reclaimed: Chantal Zakari's New Book Sends Messages to Those Inside
November 14, 2023
Boston Art Review
This is a review of SMFA Professor of the Practice Chantal Zakari’s book, Pictures from the Outside, which was inspired by a class she taught with the Tufts University Prison Initiative of Tisch College (TUPIT).

Whether machines could become conscious
November 14, 2023
The Times of India
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett’s new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking, is discussed in this The Speaking Tree blog post.

Tight inventory, high costs, increased instability: 2023 Greater Boston Housing Report Card released
November 14, 2023
Boston 25 News
Analysis of Boston-area Community Land Trusts (CLTs) by Distinguished Senior Lecturer of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Penn Loh and GSAS students Chelsey Gao and Johnny Shively is part of the Boston Foundation’s 2023 Greater Boston Housing Report Card. The UEP team found that CLTs can contribute to a healthier housing landscape.

Second-most distant galaxy discovered using James Webb Space Telescope
November 13, 2023
Science Daily
Professor of Physics & Astronomy Danilo Marchesini is among the researchers who discovered the second-most distant galaxy ever observed using data from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.

America and China: Nonviolent enemies
November 11, 2023
Philstar
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley is quoted from his August Foreign Affairs article on the United States and China as “enduring rivals.”

Subject:Matter dance company honors tap’s history and future in ICA performance
November 9, 2023 
www.baystatebanner.com
Lecturer in Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Ian Berg is quoted about dance company Subject:Matter’s October program at the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston. Berg, who is pictured while dancing, is the founder of Subject:Matter.

Comparing Gaza Death Counts to Those in Other Wars? Don’t.
November 10, 2023
The Wall Street Journal
Associate Professor of Political Science Kelly Greenhill is quoted about gathering statistical information in conflict environments from her co-edited 2010 book Sex, Drugs, and Body Counts: The Politics of Numbers in Global Crime and Conflict.
    
New conductor at Phillips Academy hopes to evoke both 'comfortable' and 'uncomfortable' emotions
November 9, 2023
The Eagle-Tribune
Lecturer in Music Douglas McRay Daniels will debut as Phillips Academy concert band conductor on November 12.

‘The Longer and Bloodier the War, the Harder it Will Be for the Democratic Coalition’
November 8, 2023
The New York Times
This opinion pieces quotes from “The Young American Left and Attitudes About Israel,” a 2022 article co-authored by Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh.

'Conflicting pressures': Riled by Israel's Gaza plans, Egypt pushes back
November 6, 2023
Middle East Eye
Professor of History Khaled Fahmy is quoted about Egypt’s stance on the Israel-Hamas conflict and the rejection of forced displacement of Palestinians to Egypt’s Sinai peninsula saying, “For Egypt’s military, Sinai is a red line.”

Thermal imaging: A promising tool to measure stress in wild animals
November 2, 2023 
Phys.org
A&S Biologist Paul Jerem and Professor of Biology Michael Romero have determined that thermal imaging is an effective technology for monitoring the stress response in wild animals, providing a noninvasive alternative for those who use such data in their work to protect wildlife populations. 

Philosopher Daniel Dennett On the Illusion of Consciousness
November 2, 2023
Down East
This profile of Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett highlights his new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking.

A Gut Check for Artificial Intelligence
November 1, 2023
The Wall Street Journal    
Associate Professor of Biology Benjamin Wolfe notes there is no consensus definition of a normal gut because microbiomes vary among healthy and sick people.

The Origins of Cerberus, and What the Three-Headed Dog Represents
October 31, 2023
Discover Magazine
Associate Professor of Classical Studies Marie-Claire Beaulieu discusses the mythology of Cerberus, the three-headed hellhound that guarded the barrier between life and the afterlife.

Harvard marks 75 years of scrutinizing Russia
October 30, 2023
Theworld
Associate Professor of Political Science Oxana Shevel comments on the challenges of academic scholarly work on Russia and its distinct regions. Shevel was a speaker at the recent symposium celebrating the 75th anniversary of Harvard University's Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian studies. (Her comments begin at 2:04.)

Consciousness: what it is, where it comes from - and whether machines can have it
October 30, 2023 
Nature
This is a review of Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett’s new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking.

Daniel C. Dennett, the fourth ‘horseman’ of atheism
October 29, 2023
EL PAÍS English    
This is a review of Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett’s new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking.

Feds eye college programs for alleged bias against men, white people
October 29, 2023
Times Union
Lenore Stern Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Natasha Warikoo comments on a wave of discrimination complaints (filed mostly by white men) against single-sex or racially targeted offerings at colleges and universities saying, “To say that any kind of differentiation is discrimination is problematic, because what these programs are designed to do is to compensate for past exclusion and the ongoing impact of that past exclusion.” 

How the Putin family's 'blood sacrifice' may be driving the high Russian casualty rate in Ukraine
October 29, 2023 
Business Insider
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Gregory Carleton is quoted throughout this article examining the history behind Russian President Vladimir Putin and his generals’ willingness to sacrifice thousands of soldiers in their war on Ukraine.

‘We Cannot Fight A.I.’: How Art Schools Are Navigating the Challenge of Artificial Intelligence
October 27, 2023
Artnet News
SMFA’s Nate Harrison, professor of the practice, and Thomas Duncan, director of admissions, share their perspectives on the challenges and opportunities that AI is bringing to art schools. The SMFA exterior as well as Harrison and Duncan are pictured.

No recipe for success: what happens to TV cooking stars after the show?
October 26, 2023
The Guardian
Associate Professor of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Tasha Oren is quoted at length in this article about how chefs’ offscreen careers are impacted by television appearances. Oren is author of the new book Food TV. 

Museum of African American History, Stone Foundation recognize authors writing about the Black American experience
October 24, 2023
MassNonprofit News
Associate Professor of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora Kerri Greenidge is among the recipients of the 2023 Museum of African American History (MAAH) Stone Book Awards for her work The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family.

The GitHub Black Market That Helps Coders Cheat the Popularity Contest
October 23, 2023
WIRED
Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Justin Hollander is quoted about his recent research examining the role and potential risk of the use of automated social media accounts (“bots”) in urban planning and real estate development saying “It seems like any entity that’s savvy and active in this space of shaping the city and being involved in these policy areas, they’re using bots.” 

China’s Window For War
October 23, 2023
Forbes
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley is quoted from a recent International Security article examining how economic growth slowdowns of rising powers has historically led to aggression and expansion by that power and the implications of this historical trend for current Chinese foreign policy. The book Chip War, by Fletcher’s Chris Miller, is also referenced.

How Science Today Can Peer Deep Into Space to Observe Our Cosmic Roots
October 23, 2023
themessenger.com
Research by Associate Professor of Physics & Astronomy Mark Hertzberg is noted among data gathered over the past decades to better understand the Big Bang and the beginning of the universe.

J.D. Tuccille: Internal party squabbles are why U.S. can't get anything done
October 23, 2023
National Post
This opinion column references new research co-authored by Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh, “The Partisan Realignment of American Business,” which found that corporate America is shifting away from its traditional alliance with the Republican Party.

Did the Infant Universe Resemble a Needle or a Sphere?
October 22, 2023
Medium.com
Work by Associate Professor of Physics & Astronomy Mark Hertzberg solving Einstein’s equations for the gravitational evolution of an anisotropic universe is mentioned in this post.

Community Resilience: Knowing Your Neighbor Could Save Your Life
October 20, 2023
Climate One
Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Justin B. Hollander and GSAS student Vernon Walker join this episode of the Climate One podcast to discuss the importance of being socially connected to neighbors when facing extreme weather events. 

‘Journalistic eye’ guides GlobeDocs Film Festival, now in its ninth year
October 19, 2023 
The Boston Globe
Associate Professor of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Kareem Khubchandani’s Kareem’s Queer Academia is among the documentary shorts featured in this year’s Boston Globe GlobeDocs Film Festival.

Mothers still more likely to be called first even when fathers are listed as primary contact at schools
October 18, 2023 
The Globe and Mail
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee comments on the implications of her collaborative study that found mothers are 1.4 times more likely than fathers to be contacted by school officials when the choice of who to call appears neutral.

Daniel Dennett’s evolutionary philosophy of mind
October 18, 2023
Times Literary Supplement
This is a review of Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett’s new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking.

Mothers still more likely to be called first even when fathers are listed as primary contact at schools
October 18, 2023
The Globe and Mail
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee discusses her recent research showing moms are more likely to be contacted first by schools.

Prohibition and Hope: The Politics of Jhumpa Lahiri’s Writings
October 17, 2023 
LA Review of Books
English Lecturer Rani Neutill examines the writings of Jhumpa Lahiri arguing that her body of work is more than just stories of assimilation, a widely levied criticism, and offers insights into the history of India and the immigrant narrative.

Understanding the Hamas-Israel war through history and human rights
October 17, 2023
KUOW Seattle News and Information
Associate Professor of Anthropology Amahl Bishara is quoted at length about the long history of conflict between Israel and Palestine.

What Causes Traffic -- and How It Separates Rich and Poor Countries
October 17, 2023 
Knowledge@Wharton
Associate Professor of Economics Adam Storeygard is among the collaborators on a new study finding a strong relationship between a country’s transportation mobility and economic development, noting that travel speeds are 50% faster in rich countries.

Dorchester Food Co-op, the first of its kind in Boston, opened this weekend
October 16, 2023 
Boston.com
In this piece on the new Dorchester Food Co-op, Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Julian Agyeman discusses the prevalence of food insecurity and injustice within redlined neighborhoods of Boston.

Family research at BYU: Which parent are schools more likely to call?
October 16, 2023 
Church News
Associate Professor of Economics Laura Gee’s collaborative study finding that mothers are 1.4 times more likely than fathers to be contacted by schools with volunteer requests, thus disproportionately bearing demands from outside forces, is highlighted in this article, which appears in one additional outlet.

Daniel Dennett’s intuition pumps
October 15, 2023
iVoox
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett joins this Night Science podcast episode to discuss topics related to creative thinking in science, sharing his perspective as a philosopher.

Cameras, cops and paranoia: How Amazon's surveillance network alters L.A. neighborhoods
October 11, 2023
Los Angeles Times
Assistant Professor of Sociology Daanika Gordon is quoted from a 2020 Tufts Now news story about her research on race and policing strategies in US communities.

Chronic diseases take a toll on U.S. life expectancy
October 10, 2023
UPI
Assistant Professor of Community Health Leah Abrams discusses new collaborative research finding that chronic diseases among older Americans is the biggest factor in life expectancy rates of Americans. Her collaborative 2020 research finding that cardiovascular disease played a big role in the stagnation in US life expectancy since 2010 is also referenced. 

Perspective: Remembering Dianne Feinstein’s trailblazing impact on the nation and my family
October 5, 2023 
Deseret
Lecturer in Political Science Katrina Lantos Swett shares personal reflections on the historical career of California Senator Dianne Feinstein. 

Attacked for Being a Non-Compliant Woman Online With Sarah Sobieraj
October 4, 2023
Canadian Women's Foundation
Professor of Sociology Sarah Sobieraj joins this Alright, Now What? podcast episode to discuss how speaking out about feminism, gender equality, sexual abuse, or specific aspects of women’s rights online can trigger violence and abuse. Sobieraj is the author of Credible Threat: Attacks Against Women Online and the Future of Democracy.

Daniel Bennett Looks Back on His Career
October 3, 2023
Skeptic
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Daniel Dennett joins The Michael Shermer Show to discuss his new memoir, I’ve Been Thinking.

Savannah’s housing market ranking and tips for home seekers
October 3, 2023 
WSAV-TV
Lecturer in Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning Rosalind Greenstein advises to consider non-financial factors, such as area fire and/or flood dangers, when purchasing a home.

Peak China may pose peak danger
October 2, 2023 
Reuters
Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley comments on geopolitical tensions between China and the West and the risk of military action or war by China. He is noted as the co-author of Danger Zone: The Coming Conflict with China.

What It Takes to Win Trump’s Voters
September 29, 2023 
The Nation
This article quotes Professor of Political Science Brian Schaffner from a June 24 The Atlantic piece that highlights his Cooperative Election Study.

Today With Dr. Kaye: Climate crisis; China-Taiwan tension
September 25, 2023
www.weaa.org
Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley joins this episode of “Today With Dr. Kaye” to discuss ongoing tensions between China and Taiwan, the role of the U.S. in this conflict, and the decline of China’s power. Beckley is the author of “Danger Zone: The Coming Conflict with China.”

Is 'containment' a realistic policy?
September 23, 2023
CGTN
This opinion piece references a Sept/Oct Foreign Affairs article by Associate Professor of Political Science Michael Beckley examining the benefits of a U.S. containment strategy towards China. 

Voters benefit as GOP embraces early voting
September 18, 2023
Washington Examiner
New collaborative research by Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science Eitan Hersh finding that state-level reforms to election laws and policies actually have “negligible effects on election outcomes” is linked in this article.

What ancient Greek stories of humans transformed into plants can teach us about fragility and resilience
September 18, 2023
SFGATE
Associate Professor of Classical Studies Marie-Claire Beaulieu examines how Greek mythology reflects the broad cycle of nature and connection between the human and plant worlds.

What makes TikTok so thirsty for Joe Burrow?
September 18, 2023
The Washington Post
Professor of Psychology Sam Sommers is quoted about the perceived attractiveness of NFL quarterbacks and how the position’s leadership role often contributes to this “well-worn trope.” Sommers is the co-author of the book “This Is Your Brain On Sports.”

In bid to stop Trump, one group is making different pitch to independents and Democrats: Vote GOP
September 18, 2023
The Boston Globe
Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted about his decision to switch voter status to enable him to vote in the Republican presidential primary, a strategy some organizations are touting to weaken Donald Trump’s chances of re-election.
    
What ancient Greek stories of humans transformed into plants can teach us about fragility and resilience
September 18, 2023 
The Conversation
Associate Professor of Classical Studies Marie-Claire Beaulieu examines how Greek mythology reflects the broad cycle of nature and connection between the human and plant worlds. 

Incomes grew in Greater Boston last year, but not as fast as inflation
September 14, 2023
The Boston Globe
Lecturer in Economics Brian Bethune and William L. Clayton Professor of International Economic Affairs Michael Klein are quoted in this article on Greater Boston’s newly released household-income and inflation-rate data. Klein is the editor of Econofact.

US, China Lay Out Vision for New World Order Amid Human Rights Differences
September 14, 2023 
VOA Voice Of America
Professor of Political Science Jeffrey Taliaferro is quoted in this article on the implications of efforts by the United States and China to expand their global influence.

Miyazaki's The Boy and the Heron cements the legacy of Studio Ghibli, says author
September 9, 2023
CBC
Professor of International Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Napier discusses Hayao Miyazaki‘s Studio Ghibli film catalog and its new film “The Boy and the Heron.” 

In Cairo's City of the Dead, demolitions are halted but 'damage already done'
September 9, 2023
Middle East Eye
Professor of History Khaled Fahmy is quoted about the historical importance of Cairo’s City of the Dead, which is being threatened by controversial infrastructure development projects led by President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.

The Best Booths at the Armory Show, Where Under-Recognized Giants and Rising Stars Collide
September 7, 2023
ARTNews
Professor of the Practice at SMFA Cathy Lu's booth at the NYC Armory show is featured in this ArtNews article and described as "arguably the most visually stunning one of the entire fair."

Why Pakistan’s founder Jinnah was opposed to the name ‘India’ for the independent Indian nation
September 6, 2023 
Indian Express
Mary Richardson Professor of History Ayesha Jalal is quoted from her book, “The Sole Spokesman: Jinnah, the Muslim League and the Demand for Pakistan.”

How corporate liberalism is changing both parties
September 3, 2023
The Washington Post
Professor of Political Science Eitan Hersh is quoted about his collaborative new research paper, “The Partisan Realignment of American Business,” and its findings that “challenge the dominant narrative in political science that corporations remain a Republican interest group.”