Racial Equity in Policy and Planning (REPP) Fellowship

The Racial Equity in Policy and Planning (REPP) program promotes racial justice in the public policy and planning fields. Dismantling and remedying the deep-seated historical inequities that policy and planning has contributed to means changing how policy and planning is practiced, as well as who is doing the work. Black, Indigenous, and People of Color practitioners have been historically underrepresented in policy and planning, while their communities have been the most harmed by racial segregation and other social, economic, and environmental inequities that policy and planning have contributed to. This initiative is hosted by UEP, in partnership with Tisch College of Civic Life.

The REPP Fellowship supports five students per year to complete UEP’s MA in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning / MS in Environmental Policy and Planning programs and supports their leadership in the field. Fellows are individuals from underrepresented groups, who – by reason of their background, culture, socioeconomic status, work and/or life experiences – have already demonstrated a commitment to and have experience in advancing racial justice and who exhibit potential to be racial justice change agents in the policy and planning fields. REPP fellows receive full tuition scholarships, stipends paid for by the Barr Foundation, paid internships, and programming to build leadership skills, develop networks, and provide socio-emotional support. REPP will also offer workshops and create a learning community for all who want to pursue anti-racist practices, policies, and outcomes in policy and planning.

To be considered for the REPP Fellowship, applicants must first apply to and be admitted to the MA in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning / MS in Environmental Policy and Planning programs. REPP’s first fellows will be selected in March 2022 (after the January 15 application deadline) and begin the program in Fall 2022.

Interested in REPP Fellowship MA in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning MS in Environmental Policy and Planning Admissions

REPP will recruit its first class of fellows in spring 2022 to begin the program in fall 2022. REPP will prioritize fellows who intend to develop their careers in the region (Massachusetts and New England) and who will, collectively over time, bend the arc of policy and planning practice towards racial justice.

2022 REPP Fellows

Melissa Cepeda

Melissa Cepeda

Melissa Cepeda is a first-generation M.A. student from The Bronx, NY. She holds a B.A. in International Relations with a minor in Peace and Justice Studies from Tufts. Upon graduating in 2021, Melissa participated in the yearlong DonorsChoose fellowship, where she worked towards addressing systemic educational inequality and bridging the education gap in America’s public schools. Melissa's upbringing in the South Bronx has motivated her to look closely at urban planning's legacy of racism, specifically around the intersections of race, food justice, and equitable education.

Elisa Guerrero

Elisa Guerrero

Elisa Guerrero is originally from Denver, Colorado. She earned her bachelor's degree in Community and Environmental Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has worked for the City of Monona, Wisconsin as the Sustainability Coordinator and Planning Assistant, tracking the City’s transition to clean energy sources and advancing other sustainability initiatives. Additionally, she worked for the Foundation for Dane County Parks on environmental engagement programs and furthering the organization's equity and inclusivity goals. Through UEP and the REPP Fellowship, Elisa hopes to explore the connections between climate justice and public health.

Patrick Houston

Patrick Houston

Patrick Houston (he/him) is a passionate organizer and activist originally from Philadelphia, PA. He spent most of the last five years building grassroots political power in low-income Black and Latinx communities in New York, with a focus on climate change and inequality. There he organized in communities most impacted by climate change; fought successfully to defeat a proposed fracked gas pipeline and a power plant; and led the organizing to pass New York’s landmark Local Law 97, which will cut pollution from the city’s largest emissions source, buildings. Patrick is a grateful alum of the Community College of Philadelphia and holds a B.A. from Swarthmore College in political science and environmental policy.

Kobe Hurtado

Kobe Hurtado

Kobe Hurtado comes to Tufts UEP from Boston College, where he was a McNair Scholar and student leader and mentor with the Thea Bowman AHANA and Intercultural Center.  Kobe holds a B.S. in Business Administration. He is a first-generation student of Ecuadorian descent who enjoys exploring Boston and immersing himself in communities found throughout the city. His experiences growing up in the city of Newark and personal background have shaped his interest in urban & environmental policy and planning.

 

Erwin Li

Erwin Li

Erwin Li (he/him) was born in San Diego, CA, and grew up in a family and community of first-generation Chinese immigrants. For years, he’s served as an educator and advocate for local and regional food sovereignty. Now, he hopes to advance models of collaboration, co-ownership, and co-governance that grow shared wealth and power for working-class communities of color. Erwin holds a B.A. in Global Affairs from Yale University. In his free time, he loves to cook, bike, watch movies, and be part of intentional community.