Faculty

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Sandra Chaouche

Lecturer
Romance Studies
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Mark Chase

Lecturer
Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning
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Richard Chechile

Professor Emeritus
Psychology
Mathematical Psychology, Memory
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Tzu-Ju Chen

Lecturer
School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts
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Virginia Chomitz

Associate Professor
Public Health and Community Medicine
My work is centered on solutions-oriented research that leverages community goals and assets to respond to priority public health issues .I have 20-plus years of experience in community-engaged and school-based research in obesity prevention, healthy eating and physical activity promotion in the cities of Boston, Cambridge, Somerville and other cities and neighborhoods in Massachusetts. Examples of my active living research include assessing the impact of school physical education and physical activity programming on PA and obesity. Examples of healthy eating research include assessing the impact of school-based food service, gardening, farm-to-school, and curricular interventions on healthy eating and obesity. My dissemination activities have focused on bringing study results to the community through reports and presentations for use in rapid quality improvement cycles. My peer-reviewed publications reflect the pragmatic research and evaluation approach I have taken to contributing to community health improvement. My current research focuses on incorporating social determinants into promoting healthy eating and phys activity and ensuring the equitable reach and relevance of interventions for vulnerable populations. I am an active member of the Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT), a coalition of researchers and community agency leads dedicated to health equity and community health improvement in Boston Chinatown. Through this community-engagement, I am conducting research on Chinese children's healthy eating and physical activity in child-care and dental-clinic settings, as well as a study assessing relationships of health and housing conditions with residents who have recently moved to affordable housing units in Boston Chinatown. I am currently engaged with Shape Up Somerville to conduct a food system assessment designed to inform policies and programs to support healthy eating in that city. These studies set the stage for externally funded longitudinal research trials and for informing local programming and policies to address health disparities.
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Ming Chow

Associate Teaching Professor
Computer Science
cyber security, web engineering
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Tatiana Chudakova

Associate Professor
Anthropology
Medical anthropology, science and technology, environment, ethnicity and indigeneity, nationalism, post-socialism. Geographic focus: Russia; North Asia My first book, Mixing Medicines: the Politics of Health in Postsocialist Siberia (Fordham 2021), follows Russia's official medical sector's attempts to reinvent itself through state-led initiatives of "medical integration" that aim to recuperate indigenous therapeutic traditions associated with the state's ethnic and religious minorities. Based in Buryatia, a traditionally Buddhist region on the border of Russia and Mongolia known for its post-Soviet revival of "Tibetan medicine" and shamanism, the book traces the uneven terrains of encounter between indigenous healing, the state, and transnational medical flows. My current research project explores how the use of "smart drugs" reconfigures discourses and experiences of clinical, social, and work-related efficacy, as they circulate across borders and enter divergent pharmaceutical, medical, and ethical regimes between Russia and the United States. Focused on a contentious category of pharmaceuticals labeled "nootropics" – a chemically fluid taxonomic classification that encompasses a variety of synthetic and naturally-derived substances designed to enhance cognitive functions – the project interrogates what types of selves, regimes of labor, therapeutic ideologies, and temporalities of embodiment these substances help mediate and enact.
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Steve Cicala

Associate Professor
Economics
Energy and Environmental Economics, Industrial Organization
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Craig Cipolla

Mellon Assistant Professor
Anthropology
North American archaeology; historical archaeology; collaborative Indigenous archaeology; Indigenous-colonial history; archaeological method & theory; colonialism; museums; material culture; archaeological theory; the history of archaeology; New England; Great Lakes My research focuses on the archaeology of Indigenous-colonial interactions in North America, particularly in New England and the Great Lakes. I combine archaeological patterns with written and oral records to learn about colonial-indigenous histories, placing them into critical dialogue with the long term Indigenous and European histories that shaped them. My research on colonialism addresses issues of ecology, identity, resistance, cultural continuity and change, and more. Much of my research is designed and carried out in collaboration with Indigenous nations. My current collaboration is with the Mohegan Tribe of Connecticut; we design and run an archaeological field school each summer on the Mohegan Reservation. There, we identify and study archaeological sites from a range of time periods, with special emphasis on Mohegan-colonial interactions in eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and we train the next generations of archaeology students in collaborative archaeological method and theory.
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Kevin Clark

Assistant Professor
Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry, Separations, Mass Spectrometry, RNA Modifications, Neuro-analytical Chemistry. Our group is interested in the characterization of RNA modifications in the central nervous system and single cells. These naturally occurring modifications to RNA biopolymers play important roles in regulating protein translation, but little is known about their functions in the brain. We are focused on developing new approaches for chromatographic separations and mass spectrometry measurements of in small-volume samples such that they can be applied for the simultaneous profiling of multiple RNA modifications in single neurons. The Clark Lab is particularly interested in ionic liquid solvents and ion-tagged oligonucleotides as customizable materials for nucleic acid sample preparation that can be leveraged to improve the performance of downstream analysis methods. We combine our analytical methodologies with a powerful neurobiological model, the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, to investigate relationships between the dynamic landscape of RNA modifications and animal behavior, learning and memory, and function of the central nervous system in health and disease.
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Downing Cless

Associate Professor Emeritus
Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies
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Steven Cohen

Senior Lecturer
Education
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Sara Colantuono

Lecturer
Romance Studies
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David Coleman

Lecturer
Music
Gospel Choir
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Graham Collins

Lecturer
School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts
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Kerri Conditto

Lecturer
Romance Studies
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John Conklin

Professor Emeritus
Sociology
Criminology; sociology of law; crime and media
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Mariah Contreras

Lecturer
Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning
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Robert Cook

Professor
Psychology
Animal Cognition and Learning
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Claire Cooley

Lecturer
International Literary and Cultural Studies
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Barbara Corbett

Lecturer
Romance Studies
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Laura Corlin

Associate Professor
Public Health and Community Medicine
Dr. Corlin is an environmental epidemiologist who develops and applies cutting-edge epidemiological and exposure assessment methods to characterize and mitigate the health effects of exposure to environmental toxicants among vulnerable populations.
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Owen Cornwall

Lecturer
Classical Studies
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Christopher Coscia

Lecturer
Mathematics
Enumerative and probabilistic combinatorics, graph theory, Markov chain Monte Carlo
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Lenore Cowen

Professor
Computer Science
data science, graph algorithms, distributed algorithms, approximate routing, classification and clustering for high-dimensional data, coloring and its generalizations, computational molecular biology
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Gregory Crane

Professor and Winnick Family Chair in Technology and Entrepreneurship
Classical Studies
Greek & Latin Language, Digital Humanities
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Charles Creagh

Lecturer
Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning
Sustainability, conservation, urban ecological systems, commute mode shift, pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure planning and design
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Eileen Crehan

Assistant Professor
Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study & Human Development
Neurodevelopmental disorders; autism spectrum disorder; sexuality education; social perception; eye tracking; dimensional measurement of psychological symptoms
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Elizabeth Crone

Affiliate
Biology
Population ecology and dynamics
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Megan Crotty

Lecturer
English
Irish and Commonwealth literature, Postcolonial literature and theory, trauma theory, intersectional feminist theory, and representations of trauma in contemporary novels by Irish women writers.
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Adrian Cruz

Lecturer
Sociology
Latin American History; Immigration, Race, and American Society
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Consuelo Cruz

Associate Professor
Political Science
Comparative Politics, Latin America
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Denise Cummings

Senior Lecturer
Film & Media Studies
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Heather Curtis

Warren S. Woodbridge Professor in Comparative Religions
Religion
Global Christianity American Religious History Religion, Humanitarianism and Philanthropy Religion, Health and Healing Evangelical, Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity Religion and Reform Movements Gender and Women's Studies in Religion
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Sugat Dabholkar

Assistant Research Professor
Education
My work focuses on designing and co-designing computational learning environments that facilitate student participation in knowledge-building practices to construct scientific knowledge. I am interested in investigating students' epistemic engagement and participation in connection with science - how students know what they know in science classrooms and how they think about knowledge construction as a central part of the endeavor of science. Another important aspect of my design-based research work is making and using agent-based computational models of complex systems to support students in thinking and learning about emergent phenomena such as natural selection. I have designed and co-designed several curricular units that have been used in high schools in the US as well as in India. Before starting research in Learning Sciences, I did some research in computational biology in India and have worked for various multinational organizations in different roles.
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Olaf Dammann

Professor
Public Health and Community Medicine
My research interest in epidemiology is the etiology of perinatal retina and brain disease. I am particularly interested in a scenario that postulates a major role for intrauterine infection as an initiator of maternal and fetal inflammatory responses that, in turn, contribute to the development of brain white matter damage and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) among preterm newborns. I have been R21 and R01-funded by the National Eye Institute to study inflammatory biomarkers and ROP. In philosophy, my area of interest is causal inference and etiological explanation. My two books in this field are "Causation in Population Health Informatics and Data Science" (Springer, 2019), co-authored with philosopher Ben Smart, and "Etiological Explanations" (CRC Press, 2020).
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Douglas McRay Daniels

Lecturer
Music
Pep Band